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''There is a time for everything, 
and a season for every activity 
under heaven: 
a time to be born and a time to die, 
a time to plant and a time to uproot, 
a time to kill and a time to heat, 
a time to tear down and a time to build, 
a time to weep and a time to laugh, 
a time to mourn and a time to dance, 
a time to scatter stones and a time to 
gather them, 
a time to embrace and a time to refrain, 
a time to search and a time to give up, 
a time to keep and a time to throw away, 

a time to tear and a time to mend, 
a time to be silent and a time to speak, 

a time to love and a time to hate, 
a time for war and a time for peace. 








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BOSTON COLLEGE 

CHESTNUT HILL, MASSACHUSETTS 02167 



OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 



Members of the Class of 1994: 

Boston College exists to communicate to each new generation 
the best elements of our intellectual heritage and culture, to 
critique that culture and to contribute to its enrichment and 
advance. 

Your four years at Boston College witnessed some of the most 
dramatic changes of our century. During your freshman year, the 
form of government that clouded all of Eastern Europe for decades, 
collapsed overnight. Fear of global war disappeared from our 
horizon. Your Junior Year saw a new President in the White House 
and a pronounced change in the country's political direction. But 
as threats of macro confrontations declined, in your home cities 
among the youth only slightly younger than you, and in smaller 
nation states around the globe, life was coarsened by the violence 
that arises out of diminished hope. 

You graduate from Boston College with young hopes fulfilled-- 
but, more importantly, as sources of hope for the evolving culture 
you enter. You carry with you gifts as one of the most highly 
qualified classes to enter this University. Those gifts have been 
intensified by new ways of knowing, by deeper appreciation of what 
makes life good and beautiful. You leave Boston College not only 
with gifts enhanced but with a chain of friends that strengthens 
each of you. 

You have my gratitude for the lasting impress you have made 
on the face of Boston College, and my prayer for God's blessing on 
each of your undertakings. 



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J. Donald Mona 
President 



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As the fighting raged on in Bosnia and Somalia, two 
old enemies were shaking hands in peace during what 
President Clinton called, "a great occasion of history and 
hope." We witnessed tragedy here at home as the 
Midwest floods and the California fires and earthquakes 
destroyed homes and families. But in the course of these 
disasters, we saw friends and neighbors, as well as 
people across the country pull together to help the vic- 
tims of these terrible tragedies. In politics, President 
Clinton continued in his course of change and improve- 
ment through his health care reforms and his attempt to 
further reinvent the government. We faced these events 
with anxiety and with anticipation. Even in the face of 
disaster, of war and of peace, it was also a time for hope. 



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urrent Events 29 







The civil war in what was once 
Yugoslavia moved through its sec- 
ond year at terrible human cost: as 
many as 200,000 people were dead 
or missing, including 10 United 
Nations relief workers who died by 
October. Much of the attention in 
the barbaric war centered on 
Sarajevo, the long-suffered Bosnian 
capital under siege by the Serbs. 
But life in other communities was 
even harder. A U.N. observer de- 
scribed Maglaj, a north Bosnian 
town of 35,000 that was besieged in 
June by Croats, as "a shattered town 
of battered people" forced to live 
underground. 

The world was drawn to So- 
malia in 1992 by photographs of 
starving children. It was almost 
driven away the following year by 
photographs of fighting adults. The 
capital. Mogadishu, was a city di- 
vided, with northern sector held by 



warlord AH Mahdi Mohamed, and 
the south by a rival, Mohamed Farah 
Aidid. Aidid and Ali Mahdi had 
united to overthrow dictator 
Mohamed Siad Barre, whom they 
forced into exile in 1 99 1 . But their 
ensuing contest for power led to a 
full-scale war over Mogadishu that 
killed 350,000 people in fighting 
and exacerbated a famine. 

Russia, one of the world's great 
powers, experienced political up- 
heaval in 1993 more typical of a 
Third World nation. When Presi- 
dent Boris Yeltsin disbanded the 
legislature September 21, many of 
its hard-liners barricaded themselves 
inside the parliament building in 
Moscow. Vice President Alexander 
Rutskoi and others tried to wrest 
power from Yeltsin in an attempted 
coup. But, when the smoke cleared 
the rebellion was crushed, and its 
leaders were in jail. 













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30 Current Events 







...and Peace 



On a sunny Monday, Septem- 
ber 13, 1993, three American 
presidents sat in awe as they wit- 
nessed a sudden turn toward peace. 
All eyes were on two old enemies in 
their new roles as peacemakers, men 
who say peace "salaam" in Arabic 
or "shalom" in Hebrew. Their 
handshake — the grasp by Arab 
Yasser Arafat of the hand of Jew 
Yitzhak Rabin — brought a gasp, a 
shout, and finally applause from 
several thousand people on the White 
House lawn. A few minutes earlier 
Rabin's Israel and Arafat's Palestine 
Liberation Organization had signed 
a peace treaty that once seemed un- 
imaginable. President Clinton, who 
guided Arafat and Rabin toward their 
historic handshake, called it a "great 
occasion of history and hope." 





Current Events 3 1 




F 

It was the biggest, wettest story 
of the summer. The floods that 
washed across the Midwest may 
have been the worst in American 
history, and they captured the con- 
cern of people across the nation. 

The stage for disaster was set 
during the winter, when unusually 
heavy snow fell. There were no 
midwinter thaws, so the snow melted 
rapidly as spring arrived, enough to 
cause scattered record flooding. And 
then came the rain. The casualties 
ranged from the thousands left 
homeless to investors and consum- 
ers in every corner of the United 
States. Some farm produce prices 
rose and insurers had to pay out 
millions in compensation. 

Another disastrous event 
occured when an Amtrak train 
hurtled off a bridge into an inky 
bayou in Saraland, Alabama, early 
on the morning of September 22, 
1993, plunging its sleeping passen- 
gers into a nightmare of fire, water 
and death. A barge had struck and 
weakened the bridge shortly before 
the wreck, which killed 47 people 
aboard the cross-country Sunset 
Limited. Some of the victims were 
trapped in a submerged, silver pas- 
senger car, others in a burned en- 
gine. It was the deadliest wreck in 
Amtrak's 23-year history. But 159 
people survived, and some helped 
other passengers who clung to 
wreckage from a collapsed section 
of the bridge. Another passenger 
car dangled perilously from what 
was left of the bridge. "We were 
asleep and the next thing you know 
we were in the water," said passen- 
ger Bob Watts. "I though it was a 
dream." 




32 Current Events 







Current Events 33 



Reinventing Government 



Declaring that "the times are 
changing," Ruth Bader Ginsburg in 
1993 became the second woman to 
sit on the United States Supreme 
Court and the 107th Supreme Court 
justice. At her swearing in ceremony 
at the White House on August 1 0, the 
60-year-old women's rights pioneer 
said that "in my lifetime, I expect that 
there will be among federal judicial 
nominees . . .as many sisters as brothers 
in law." 

"That prospect is indeed cause 
for hope, and its realization will be 
cause for celebration," she added. 
She was President Clinton's first 
nominee to the high court, and was 
overwhelmingly confirmed by the 
Senate. 



President Clinton's point man 
on health care reform in 1993 was 
his wife, First Lady Hillary Rodham 
Clinton. When Mrs. Clinton ap- 
peared before Congress to implore 
its members to work with the ad- 
ministration to overhaul the health 
care system, she got a movie star's 
reception. But the talk quickly turned 
to business. Representative Pete 
Stark, a California Democrat, said 
he favored expanding Medicare to 
cover all Americans. He told Mrs. 
Clinton that his mother fears that 
she would be worse off under 
Clinton's reform plan. Mrs. Clinton 
conceded that Stark had a point. "I 
have a mother too," she said, "so if 
we can't pass the mother test, we're 



in trouble." 

In a further attempt to reinvent 
government, President Clinton and 
Vice President Gore outlined plans to 
cut, consolidate and reshape the fed- 
eral bureaucracy. The president's 
speech on September 7, 1993, prom- 
ised $108 billion in savings by the. 
century's end. "This is an American] 
imperative and we all need to be a parti 
of it," Clinton said. Six months in the; 
making, the administration's report — 
entitled "From Red Tape to Results:; 
Creating a Government that Workss 
Better and Costs Less" — marked the.' 
beginning of what the president saidl 
would be a hard fight to change the; 
bureaucracy. 




34 (urrenl Events 




Current Events 35 



eople in me news... 



One of the biggest stories of 
the 1993-1994 basketball season 
occured before the first pre-season 
exhibition game —Michael Jordan, 
the world's best basketball player 
and one of its most famous athletes, 
announced his retirement. Jordan's 
retirement came after he had led the 
Chicago Bulls to three straight NBA 
championships, the most recent a 
victory over the Phoenix Suns in the 
1993 finals. "The thrill is gone. I've 
done it all. There's nothing left for 
me to do," Jordan told a reporter the 
night before his formal announce- 
ment. 

In August of this year Pope 
John Paul II spent four days in the 
United States. On the last day of his 
visit to Denver, the Pope denounced 
the "culture of death." "The culture 
of life means respect for nature and 
protection of God's work of cre- 
ation," John Paul said in a farewell 
address. The pontiff had celebrated 
a mass at a park just outside Denver, 
concluding World Youth Day, the 
biennial pilgrimage of international 
youth. 

In the world of entertainment, 
the show started off as an upstart, 
but by the time they finished hand- 
ing out the prime time Emmy awards 
on September 29, "Seinfeld" was a 
member of the sitcom Old Boys 
Club. The NBC program took home 
three trophies, making it one of the 




night's biggest winners. "Now we're 
part of the establishment," Jerry 
Sienfeld told reporters after the pro- 
gram. "We're part of the old guard." 

In music, it was the year of 
grunge rock, and aband from Seattle 
known as Nirvana was among the 
proudest purveyors of this un- 
adorned, grinding form of rock 'n' 
roll. Arrested Development won 
the MTV Video Music Award for 
best rap video and the Grammy for 
"newcomer of the year." The hip- 
hop group also won attention with a 
message to black Americans: spend 
more time and money expressing 
your African heritage. 

This year we also said goodbye 
to many great people, including 
Reggie Lewis, captain of the Boston 
Celtics, and Arthur Ashe, the tennis 
star who died of AIDS . 





\ll photos courtesy ol \r Press 



Ui ( urrenl I Events 







Current Events 37 





As the scaffolding came down around Devlin and the 
finishing touches were placed on the new art museum, 
the walls of Fulton were being knocked down. It is 
apparent from the construction that change continues to 
be an integral part of this university's quest for excel- 
lence. Despite these changes, however, many things will 
always be a part of Boston College. Under the Jesuit 
tradition, Boston College maintained its dedication to 
the liberal arts and remained one of the top universities 
in the nation. Students still contemplated Artistotle, 
struggled through equations and concepts, and spent 
endless hours in O'Neill perfecting that paper or cram- 
ming in a year' s worth of knowledge. It was certainly a 
time for change, and for tradition. 




L. 




Academics 39 



College 

of 

Arts and Sciences 



BOSTON COLLEGE 

CHESTNUT HILL, MASSACHUSETTS 02167-3803 




COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
OFFICE OF THE DEAN 
(617)552-3271 



To the Class of 1994: 

Yours has been an exciting and accomplished c 
at Boston College full of promise — promise that has 
fulfilled. Your academic accomplishments are well 
number of you who have appeared consistently on the 
have been celebrated at the Dean's Scholars' Dinner 
College. And all of you, whether or not you have a 
academic distinction, have fulfilled your intellect 
significant ways. In addition, your commitments to 
the spirit of the Jesuit tradition, have been gener 
have helped in many ways to build up the strong and 
cherish here at Boston College. 



lass, which began its time 

been wonderfully 
attested to by the large 

Dean's List, while others 

and as Scholars of the 
chieved this level of 
ual potential in 

the service of others, in 
ous and wholehearted. You 

caring community we 



There have been many change 
career: the opening of the world 
reopening of the magnificent Devi 
of Fine Arts to the Main Campus a 
level of artistic excellence; the 
Center in O'Neill Library; new ac 
Department and our new Department 
of two impressive new residence h 
Lower Campus. 



s during the four years of your undergraduate 
-class Merkert Chemistry Center; the 
in Hall, allowing us to bring our Department 
nd our Boston College Museum of Art to a new 

opening of the O'Connor Academic Development 
ademic programs like our thriving young Music 

of Theater — and, most recently, the opening 
alls and a beautiful dining facility on the 



But with all the changes, happily there are dimensions of Boston College 
that do not change. There continues to be the same sense of intellectual 
challenge and excitement, the same strong sense of community for which Boston 
College is celebrated, the same sense of commitment to the ideals of service. 

Boston College will continue to change — as any institution must--but it 
will remain, in its essentials, what it has always been. When you return to 
visit, as I hope you will do often, you will see changes as the years go by, 
but we trust it will always be what it has been for you--a community founded 
on faith in God, on loving concern for one another, and on the sense of our 
larger responsibilities to the world around us. 

As alumni and alumnae of Boston College, you will carry the light of 
faith and love wherever you go, and we know that the world will be a better, 
more just, and more caring place because of what you bring to it — in your 
work, in your family lives, and in your community. The Lord bring you and all 
your loved ones peace and joy for all the years to come! 



O, /^W^^r ^ 



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College of Arts and Sciences 41 



Variety is the Spice of Learning 



The School of Arts and Sciences is 
by far the most popular school within the 
university. In fact, the number of Arts 
and Sciences students is more than double 
that of the next most populous school, the 
Wallace E. Carroll School of Manage- 
ment. The School of Arts and Sciences' 
popularity is in part due to the wide range 
of subjects and majors that it offers. From 
Biology to Theology, the School of Arts 
and Sciences seems to have so much to 
offer its students. 

"There's such a broad basis of dif- 
ferent courses! There are just so many 
subjects that you can learn about. I think 
its really great that everyone in the uni- 
versity has to basically complete the same 
core requirement. Otherwise I might not 
have taken the philosophy and theology 
classes, which I enjoyed." explained 
Andrea Mendelson. 

Many students feel that being in a 
school with so many different choices for 
majors allows them to experiment with 
different subject areas by taking a wide 
range of classes that the school offers 
students of the entire university. By en- 
rolling in one of the other schools, a 
student may limit themselves to just that 
subject area, such as education or nurs- 
ing, where as in the School of Arts and 
Sciences, they would not. 

Because students are not required to 
choose a major until the end of their 
sophomore year, they can remain unde- 
cided while trying out different classes to 
see what suits them the best. This means 
that students have more electives through 
which they can broaden their horizons. 

This is just one of the many qualities 
that makes the School of Arts and Sci- 
ences an integral part of Boston College 
and a great place to find out what you 
want to learn about and maybe establish 
a career in. 

Lisa DcLoric 



42 College of Arts and Sciences 




Amy Luiz 



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Wallace E. Carroll 
School of Management 






BOSTON COLLEGE 

CHESTNUT HILL, MASSACHUSETTS 02167-3808 




THE WALLACE E. CARROLL SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT 
OFFICE OF THE DEAN 



Dear Friends, 

This can be a bittersweet time for many of you. Indeed, there is a real sense that 
you are saying farewell to the greatest years of your life. For most this has been a 
spectacular time of growth - in knowledge, understanding, and friendship. I want to 
assure you that Boston College is not over. It is merely time to swim in different 
waters, but you will always be welcome in this old stream. 

Lately there has been a growing relationship between college, one's major in 
particular, and the work one does upon graduation. Increased professional specialization 
and an economy scarcely expanding have strengthened this connection. If this growing 
connection inhibits learning and diminishes care for a wide spectrum of people, ideas and 
causes then it has become too strong. Work is important to us all. It enriches who we 
are as persons and can be a powerful force for a good common to us all. Even Aristotle 
noted that "we exist in activity, by living and acting. . . he therefore loves his work, 
because he loves existence." We need to excel continually, but we also cannot abandon 
an even greater obligation to continue to learn and to reflect. This is the great aim of 
education after all, perhaps especially at a liberal arts University: to have us always 
learn and broaden our concern. I ask you not to end quite yet the task of learning. In that 
way Boston College will continue for you. 

Second, besides continuing to learn, you should remember. This was a very good 
time and deserves to be commemorated time and again even as the memory itself 
burnishes the images and smoothes some untidy edges. There will be other great times 
and they, too, deserve continual revisitation. That is what this book is all about really, 
a key to many memories and more that are still not fixed. 

If you always learn, always remember, you will never really leave Boston 
College. After all, we all become commuters eventually. May you come back and visit 
this hill often and may God be gentle with you always. 

Sincerely, 



(M, (/$£/«* 



John J- Neuhauser 
Dean 



idII School <»i Man 




Wallace E. Carroll School of Management 45 



Not Exactly Business As Usua 




It began during the summer of 1 993 . I 
saw the furniture being moved out. Soon 
offices and classrooms were gutted, and 
finally the walls came down. This scene, 
unfortunately, was all I would see of 
Fulton Hall during my senior year. As a 
result of this project, classes and offices 
were moved throughout campus. Many 
professors even found themselves at St. 
Clement's down the street. This has no 
doubt been an inconvenience for every- 
one. 

I have had to live with construction 
throughout most of my years at Boston 
College. It is apparent that change is an 
integral part of this university's quest for 
excellence, and the refurbishment of 
Fulton is a part of that process. It is 
unfortunate that this had to happen dur- 
ing my senior year, but when I imagine 
what Fulton will be like once it is com- 
pleted, and although I will have already 
graduated by then, I know it will be worth 
the wait. 

When I think back, however, I've come 
to realize that the CSOM is more than just 
a building. What will stand out in my 
mind will be the classes, the professors, 
and the close friencs I've met. There was 
a sense of community because although 
we were encouraged to develop as indi- 
viduals, we couldn't have done so with- 
out the support of others. 

No matter what our major was, as 
CSOM students, we endured many of the 
same classes together. We spent endless 
hours in the OCF struggling through the 
same assignments. And who can forget 
the dreaded, but inevitable group projects 
and presentations. Out came the business 
attires in hopes of impressing the profes- 
sor by our appearance, as well as by the 
material itself. And as wc helped each 
Other out, wc developed friendships that 
will last a lifetime. 

The CSOM curriculum has provided 
us with a broad base of knowledge in 
order to better prepare us to meet the 

46 Carroll School of Management 




demands of an ever changing world. The 
professors themselves have challenged 
us to open our eyes to the world around 
us, to recognize our opportunities, and to 
not be afraid to push ourselves as we 
pursue these goals. They have also taken 
the time to listen, to offer advice, and to 
really gel to know their students. 

Our years as CSOM student have en- 



riched us through the people and experi- 
ences we've encountered. They have.' 
equipped us with the proper skills and! 
knowledge, and have given us the confi- 
dence we will need to become effective 
and responsible leaders in business and I 
society. 

Phuong Bui 
CSOM '941 




Ann Filzgibbon 



Carroll School of Management 47 



ttm/^gmmaamm 



School of 
Nursing 



BOSTON COLLEGE 

CHESTNUT HILL, MASSACHUSETTS 02167-3812 




SCHOOL OF NURSING 
OFFICE OF THE DEAN 
(617) 552-4251 



Dear School of Nursing Class of 1994: 

Congratulations on your graduation and on your achievements during 
your time at Boston College. You have moved from learning skills in the lab to 
caring for patients in some of the nation's most highly respected clinical 
agencies. You have witnessed birth and death, and in the process have 
matured into individuals who are ready to begin your professional careers. 

Change has marked your passage through Boston College. You have 
changed, the world has changed, and health care delivery in the United States 
is undergoing massive change which will have profound effects on your 
profession. Change presents opportunities, as well as challenges, and we 
believe that you are well prepared to meet the challenges you will face. 

Your education at Boston College has provided you not only will skills 
specific to the profession of Nursing, but also with a liberal arts core based on 
the Jesuit tradition which emphasizes the importance of the principle of 
justice. Ethical decision making has been a consistent theme throughout your 
curriculum. This foundation should enable you to be leaders in shaping a new 
health care delivery system that will provide quality care to all Americans. 

The very abilities that brought you to Boston College and ensured your 
success are your gifts to your profession. Use them well and make us even 
prouder of us in the future than we are of you today. 

Sincerely, 

Barbara Hazard Munro, Ph.D., F.A.A.N. 
Dean and Professor 



Paul Hezel 



4K School of Nui 




School of Nursing 49 



A Commitment to People 



The Boston College School of Nursing is ranked as 
one of the best nursing schools in the country. It has a 
very prestigious reputation not only in the Boston area, 
but also, throughout the United States. This reputation 
would not exist if it were not for the renowned faculty 
members, each of whom brings his or her own unique 
philosophy into the classroom. Although being accepted 
into the Boston College School of Nursing is a great 
academic achievement, the decision to become a nurse is 
an even greater personal achievement. The decision 
shows that the individual has compassion, dedication, 
and real commitment to people. In other words, the 
nursing profession shows a real commitment to the Jesuit 
tradition: Men and women for others. 

The curriculum in the School of Nursing is extremely 
challenging, with a heavy emphasis on sciences and 
theory. Though very rigorous, all the hard work pays off 
in the clinical setting, when one can apply all the knowl- 
edge one has accumulated over the course of four years. 
Boston College nurses graduate with a sense of self- 
confidence after completing their required studies. 

As a sophomore in the School of Nursing, I have only 
had a taste of nursing, with my off-campus experiences, 
practice in simulation laboratory, and beginning to inter- 
act with the community as a nurse. I anxiously await my 
clinical experiences to apply what I have been learning in 
the classroom to actual patients, and make the nursing 
experience a reality. 

Margaret Swope 
SON '96 




Elizabeth Farrell 




50 School of Nursing 



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Cheryl Simrany 




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School of Nursing 5 1 



School of 
Education 




BOSTON COLLEGE 

CHESTNUT HILL. MASSACHUSETTS 02167-3813 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATrON 
OFFICE OF THE DEAN 
CAMPION HALL 101 
(617) 552-4200 
(617) 552-0812 Fax 



To The Class of 1994, 

It is hard to believe that your four years at Boston College have come and gone 
so quickly. It is also amazing to recall all that has happened in those four years. 

The School of Education has grown significantly during the time you've been 
with us. The beautiful expansion and renovation of Campion Hall is a representation 
of how the School has changed in the time you have been here. You have changed 
dramatically also in the time you've spent in Campion Hall. It has been the privilege of 
the faculty, staff, and administrators to work to further your development, both 
personal and professional. 

As you depart Campion Hall and leave the university to address the challenges 
and opportunities that arise in the years to come, we will always be with you. And, we 
challenge you to endeavor to influence the future as we have tried to influence you. In 
your careers in education or the human services professions and in your lives as 
parents, spouses, and family members, you will "touch the future." 

We wish all the very best for you. Congratulations on your accomplishments 
and come back to the Heights soon. 

Sincerely, 



~7* 



\ 



Y\5= 




Diana Pullin 
Dean 



Amy Lutz 



!i Ikm. I (it Education 




School of Education 53 



"Good Morning Miss Shapley!" 



This is music to your ears if you are an 
aspiring teacher at your first teaching placement. 
My own class of fifth graders at the Elementary 
School greeted me with this enthusiastic excla- 
mation on my first morning of student teaching. 
It will be a moment that is forever engraved in my 
memory. 

I'll admit that I was terrified when I walked 
into Room 13, but a few minutes were all that 
were necessary before I felt completely relaxed 
and wonderfully welcomed. During my semes- 
ter there I have gotten to know every student 
individually and have grown to love them all. the 
class's enthusiasm and outstanding effort con- 
tinually amaze me. They have an aspiring will- 
ingness to learn and to try, and they are not afraid 
to fail. Getting an answer wrong only means that 
they raise their hands twice as high the next time 
so that they can be sure to prove themselves that 
they can get it right. 

Having this oppurtunity to teach has opened 
a whole new world for me. During my placement 
at Emerson Elementary, I have learned an infi- 
nite amount about teaching, and, most impor- 
tantly, about children. I have pinpointed the 
qualities in myself that will make me a good 
teacher, along with those that I need to change. 
Through this student teacher experience I have 
witnessed the challenges and rewards that are 
waiting for me in my future career, and I welcome 
them with confidence and enthusiasm. The 
outstanding pre-practicum programs at the Boston 
College School of Education have given me the 
oppurtunity to live a dream this semester. I have 
become a teacher. From the moment my class 
wished me good morning and for the rest of my 
life, I am a teacher! 

Nicole Shapley 
SOE '96 






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54 School of Education 








Elizabeth Farrell 



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School of Education 



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..That is what learning is. 

I You suddenly understand 
something you've 
understood all your life, 
but in a new way. 

- Doris Lessing 





56 Siiul 







Studying 57 



Evening College 



The B.C. Evening College was founded in 1929 
based on the belief that an education pursued on a part- 
time basis should be equal both in quality and in value 
to one pursued full-time. Almost 6,000 students have 
benefited from this philosophy and graduated from 
Evening College. The 1994 seniors represent its 
sixty-fifth graduating class. The Evening College is 
made up of many types of non- traditional students: 
young adults, professionals, union members, business 
managers, homemakers, and those who simply want 
to learn for the sheer joy of it. This diversity is what 
makes the Evening College special. The Evening 
College Senate was created as a means of unifying 
such a varied group of individuals beyond the class- 
room. Concerned with building camaraderie among 
the students, the Senate works to make their experi- 
ence here as full as possible by providing ways for 
students to become more involved with the B.C. 
community as a whole. A monthly newsletter, the 
Evening Express, is distributed to students informing 
them about campus events, financial aid, senate ac- 
tivities, and other pertinent information. Congratu- 
lations to this year's graduating class! 

Renee M. Cardona, Senate Chair 




Whaddaya want for dinner— Snickers or Doritosl 



All photos courtesy of Renee Cardona 





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58 Evening College 



A lesl tonight?! 1 really need this bull! 



'It is wonderful to have an oppurtunity to make dreams a reality." 

-James A. Woods, S.J., Dean of the Evening College 




Evening College Senate members: (top, 1-r) Peter 
Godino, Joseph Riley, Brenda Mclsaac; (bottom, 1- 
r) Enrique Vitug, Renee Cardona(Chair), Janette 
Piemonte; (missing from picture) Chris Buckley, 
Magdalene de los Rios, Rob Donofrio, Terry 
Lepore, Leah Rochelle, Caryn Serating, Joy 





Many thanks to Father Woods and the 
Evening College staff for their 
guidance and support. (1-r: Dean 
James A. Woods, S.J., Cathy 
Jankowski, Betty Strain, Cheryl 
Wright, Dimitra Maund, Norma 
Robbins) 

Evening College 59 1 



Libraries 




60 Libraries 










Kathryn Bishop 



Libraries 61 



Foreign Study Abroad 



Each year more than three hundred 
juniors and seniors spend either all or 
part of their year studying abroad. Stu- 
dents may participate in programs ad- 
ministered by Boston College at Univer- 
sity College, Cork, the University of 
Strasbourg, and the University of 
Glasgow, Scotland. They also have the 
option of enrolling directly at other ap- 
proved foreign universities or attending 
approved programs sponsored by 
American colleges and universities or 
independent organizations. 

The Irish Studies Program at the 
University College, Cork provides inten- 
sive exposure in areas of Irish culture not 
normally available in the United States, 
such as Irish ethnography, folklore, and 
anthropology. At the University of 
Strasbourg in France, students may par- 
ticipate in a full year exchange at the 
Political Science Institute. This program 
offers courses of study in Political Sci- 
ence, History and Economics. The city 
of Strasbourg is at the center of the Euro- 




pean Community and is the site of the 
European Parliament, the Council of Eu- 
rope and the Human Rights Commission. 
Students may also choose to attend the 
Sophia University in Tokyo, which is a 
Jesuit institution and one of Japan's elite 
universities. There are many other pro- 
grams that offer students a chance to 
experience the scene abroad. For in- 
stance, the Abbey Theatre Summer Pro- 
gram is a six-week summer workshop 
during which participants study acting, 
directing, production, management, and 
the history of the Irish theater, as well as 
staging an Irish play. 

Studying for one semester or for a 
full year in a different country gives stu- 
dents an exciting break from the regular 
Boston College academic and social 
scene, as well as from the entire United 
States. Students receive an invaluable 
education. There, the students cannot 
help but to be enriched by their host 
country's valuable culture and history, 
and by the people themselves. 





62 Studying Abroad 



Man or Magician?! 



You've skipped classes for an en- 
tire semester and exams are in less than 
a week. Or, you've been to all your 
classes the entire semester, but you're 
as lost as you were on the first day. 
Even with that huge class curve, your 
test grade is still less than average, and 
the next test will determine your se- 
mester grade- and the rest of your life! 
The TA is as confusing if not more 
than the professor himself! 
AAARGH! ! ! What are you going to 
do? ! Get a tutor of course ! Whatever 
your troubling academic situation is, 
tutors seem to be the answer to them 
all. Whether you choose one of the 
more popular Academic Development 
Center tutors, a private tutor, or even 
your own trusty and very intelligent 
roommate, you can always count on 
these special people no matter what 
the cost. 

What magic or charm surrounds 
them that you are finally able to under- 
stand that physics concept, solve that 
long calculus problem, or finally get 



all those history facts and dates straight in 
your head? Perhaps it isn't magic that 
they possess, but rather, they just have a 
saintly amount of patience, remarkable 
intelligence, and a gifted talent for 
teaching the impossible— to the impos- 
sible! Of course, you can't depend on the 
tutor himself to magically boost your 
grade up- we already established the fact 
that they're not some type of magicians 
with magical grade wands. Instead, you 
must work with the tutor. Just as these 
tutors have patience and perseverance 
with us, we too must have the same pa- 
tience and determination to work with 
them and to honestly try to understand. 
What would it be like without these tal- 
ented and gifted people in our academic 
life? Do the words "failing", "summer 
classes", or even "angry parents" mean 
anything to you? — Not if you have your 
trusty tutor by your side ! 

(This is dedicated to my own "magi- 
cal" tutor, N.S.) 

Tar a Bui 




64 Tutoring 




\ui\ I un 




Tutoring 65 



The Honor is All Theirs 




Like any other college or uni- 
versity, Boston College has its own 
select societies originally instituted to 
honor its brightest scholars. The 
Golden Key National Honor Society is 
among these prestigious groups. The 
Golden Key society is a national aca- 
demic honor organization dedicated to 
excellence which unites the talents of 
the brightest undergraduates students 
in America. "Scholastic Achievement 
& Excellence" is what every Golden 
Key candidate must possess. Mem- 
bership is by invitation only, but once 
admitted, and a membership fee is 
paid, that membership is for life. The 
society awards more than $700,000 in 
scholarship awards to outstanding 
junior and senior initiates each year. 

Alpha Sigma Nu, the national 
honor society of Jesuit colleges and 
universities, was incorporated in 1915 
at Marquette University. Their motto 
is "Scholarship, Loyalty, Service." 
This is partially what Alpha Sigma Nu 
bases its selection on. Students with a 
GPA of at least 3.0 and are in the top 
15% of their respective classes are 



eligible for acceptance. However, only 
four percent of junior and senior classes 
at any given school may be nominated. 
It is expected of students to continue 
along with their involvement with stu- 
dent government, publications, cultural 
and religious organizations, service 
programs and athletics when they ac- 
cept membership. 

Finally, Beta Gamma Sigma is 
the honor society for the Collegiate 
Schools of Business. Membership is 
contingent upon the students being in 
the upper seven percent of their junior 
class or the top ten percent of their 
senior class. These students are elected 
to membership and publicly recognized 
during the spring semester. The mis- 
sion of the society is to not only en- 
courage and honor high academic 
achievement by students of business 
and management through its chapters, 
but also to foster an enduring com- 
mitment to the principles and values of 
the society: honor and integrity, the 
pursuit of wisdom and earnestness. 

Lisa DeLorie 







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66 Honor Societies 



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Honor Societies 67 



The Computer Crazi 



When people think of the O'Neill 
Computing Facility, they have visions of 
busy students working diligently at their 
terminals trying to finish that last minute 
paper. They also envision long lines of 
people waiting to sign up to get on a 
computer, and an even longer wait to 
actually use a computer. After having 
completed your assignment, however, 
you must walk down the hall to the 
printout room where you should be pre- 
pared to wait a while longer for your 
paper to be printed out. 

It seems as if waiting and the OCF 
have become synonymous around exam 
time. While it is true that you can walk 
right in and sit down to work immedi- 
ately, towards the end of the semester 
you have to be there pretty early in the 
morning to do so. All of the hassle is due 
to the fact that there just aren't enough 
computers to accommodate all of the 
students. There are 1 16 Macintoshes, 14 
IBMs, and 26 VAX machines available 
for the students to use. When it seems that 
the entire university needs to work on 
assignments in OCF all at once, it's just 
not enough. 

On a positive note, the OCF has 
added a couple of new services this year. 
The printout room now honors requests 
to print double sided pages, which is an 
added convenience to students who would 
otherwise have to make an extra trip to a 
copy service center such as Kinkos to 
achieve the desired outcome. 

Students may also use the VAX 
machines to not only register, but to also 
use the e- mail system. E- mail is short for 
electronic mailing. It is much like talking 
to someone over the telephone, but in- 
stead you type your responses. 

Finally, the OCF is continuing the 
course registration on the Macintoshes 
and the VAX machines. Although stu- 
dents have to go across the hall to regis- 
ter, they can drop-add in the computer lab 
to see what courses they have chosen, as 

68 Computer Facility 




Randall TarasuK 



well as the status of other courses. It is a 
more updated version of the CoRSS list- 
ing and much quicker than leafing through 
the newspaper trying to find a certain 
class which may be closed by the time 
you register for it. 

The OCF, for all of its waiting and 
delays, is an excellent facility. The OCF 
staff is always very helpful in trying to 
help students and to accommodate spe- 
cial requests. In these respects, it is an 
asset that students could not do without. 

Lisa DeLorie 




Computer Facility 69 



The Boston College Museum o 



The Boston College Museum of Art 
celebrated its official opening on Octo- 
ber 1 , 1 993 in the newly renovated Devlin 
Hall. Highlighted by a black tie gala, the 
opening included a special exhibition, on 
loan from Ireland's National Gallery and 
unveiled BC's newly restored permanent 
collection, containing works from various 
periods of history from Europe, Asia and 
the Americas. 

The idea for the Boston College Art 
Museum has taken three years to be real- 
ized. Along with her staff, Nancy Netzer, 
director of the museum, collaborated with 
the architect on the design for the museun 
and said, "This facility, with its state-of- 
the-art temporature, humidity, and secu- 
rity system makes it an ideal space to 
exhibit works which have different 
specifications for the exhibition and room 
enviroment." 

Originally designed by Charls D. 
Maginnis and completed in 1924, the 
newly renovated Devlin Hall also houses 
reception ares and an auditorium for the 
Museum events, lectures and symposia. 
On two floors of the newly renovated 
bulding, the Museum offers both a per- 
manent art collection presented on the 
lower level and a special exhibition space 
which will feature works from all periods 
and cultures. 

The museum is the only one in the 
Boston area to use Micro Gallery, which 
allows viewers who visit the museum to 
use an interactive computer to display 
information and images of works in the 
permanent collection. It also features 
photographs of related works, accessed 



70 Art Museum 






by simply touching the screen. 

By adding its own name to the list of 
other well know universities, such as 
Tufts and Notre Dame, both of which 
have also built museums on campus, 
Boston College has declared its position 
as a nationally recognized liberal arts 
institution with something important to 
offer. "The museum is an integral part of 
the university's teaching mission," Netzer 



explained, "It serves teaching programs 
throughout the University and is an ex- 
tension of the liberal arts curriculum." 
Netzer also went on to add that the 
Muesem will enhance life at Boston Col- 
lege and encouraged students to "take 
advantage of this invaluable and precious 
resource." 

Zchnlon Miletsm 




Ann Fitzgibbon 




Photo courtesy of Helen Swartz. B.C. Museum of Art 



Art Museum 71 



Career Planning for a Lifetime 



George Donaldson was the director 
of the Placement Bureau when it was 
established in 1941 to help BC students 
locate jobs upon graduation. Originally 
located in a single room of the college 
library that used to be in Gasson Hall, the 
Placement Bureau was also established 
as a military placement center after the 
bombing of Pearl Harbor to encourage 
students to join the war effort. Since its 
inception in 1 94 1 , it has had many homes: 
Bapst Library, McElroy Commons, and 
Alumni Hall. In 1975 it was moved into 
its own building at 38 Commonwealth 
Avenue. 

The Placement Bureau is now called 
the Career Center and it helps not only 
undergraduate students, but also gradu- 
ate students and alumni. Director Marilyn 
Morgan and her staff have a variety of 
different services to help those who come 
to the Career Center. Students are asked 
to complete three steps in their search for 
employment, graduate school studies, and 
internships. First, students need to assess 
themselves. In other words, they find out 
what their strengths, skills and talents 
are. Next, they begin to research what 
kind of opportunities exist for them in 
consideration of their talents. Now that 
the student knows what direction they 
want to take, the job search begins. 

The student writes a resume detail- 
ing his achievements and previous em- 
ployment record, writes various cover 
letters giving specifics to employers as to 
why that student would make a valuable 
contribution to the company, and attend 
career fairs to see what companies they 
might like to work for, and possibly make 
a few contacts. 

Morgan emphasized that these three 
steps are a crucial life skill. "We inform 
students that on the average, people 
change jobs eight to ten times during 
their lives and make three to four career 
changes. Therefore, students, graduates, 
and alumni need to learn the process of 

72 Career Center 




career planning and use it throughout 
their lives." 

With the use of the Career Resource 
Library, students can utilize books on 
career fields and job search strategies, as 
well as graduate school information. The 
library also has video tapes of career 
panels that are at the students' disposal. 
Another great asset of the center is Dis- 
cover. Discover is the Career Center's 
computerized career guidance system 
which is an alternate way for students to 



Elizabeth Farrell 

access information about careers and po- 
tential employers. 

Morgan couldn't stress enough the 
importance of planning- the earlier, the 
better. She encouraged students in any 
class to come down and use the Center's l 
vast resources for summer jobs and in- 
ternships, as well as to get a better per- 
spective of what they would like to pur- 
sue as a career. Your career depends on i 
how well you prepare for it. 

Lisa DcLorie 







m 



Once again we called Boston College home. With this came 
another year of memories, some of which we could have done 
without, many we will cherish forever, but all unforgettable. Our 
lives on the Heights were full of ups and downs, and whether we 
were walking through the Dustbowl or celebrating our victory in 
South Bend, these daily routines and special moments slowly 
became integral parts of us and shaped us into who we are today. 
But despite the flurry of activities around us and within our lives, 
and no matter how significant an event, it was the people who 
made these moments so special. These nameless faces we first 
met upon entering BC became our closest friends whom we 
couldn't imagine our lives without. And together we continued 
to learn and grow, to laugh and live, and upon these Heights, to 
make new memories. 






Student Life 75 



Around Campus 



Tradition and 
Change on Campus 



WTT^r- 



When a student is asked 
why he or she came to 
Boston College, it seems that 
the campus contributed a lot to 
their decision. Residing at its 
Chestnut Hill location for more 
than eighty years, the campus 
not only reflects the tradition 
and evolution of the Univer- 
sity, it reflects the students who 
choose to walk within its walls . 

From the grandeur of 
Gasson Hall, where "the towers 
of the Heights reach the heav 'n's 
own blue," to the sparkling-new 
residence halls and dining hall 
on lower campus, one sees how 
BC is trying to preserve its history 
while adapting to necessary 
changes in the BC community 
and its members. Through 
expansion and renovation, BC 
constantly adj usts so that students 
can take full advantage of what 
the campus has to offer. 

Quiet places, like Bapst 
lawn and O'Neill plaza, offer a 
refuge from the hustle and 
bustle of locations like the 



Quad, Dustbowl, and even 
Higgins stairs. Meanwhile, old 
is giving way to the new. As 
cranes place steel beams into 
Fulton's foundation, work 
continues on improvements 
that we can be proud of. One 
just needs to look at Devlin 
Hall to see what such a facelift 
can do. 

For the people who 
have called the University 
home for four years, BC's 
campus is a representation of 
diversity and constancy. The 
students, though very different 
and unique, also share the sta- 
tus of a BC student, displaying 
pride for our alma mater wher- 
ever they go. Similarly, from 
the Gothic splendor of the 
Quad, to the newer facilities 
like Conte Forum and Merkert, 
and from the tradition of Upper 
Campus dorms to Lower Cam- 
pus apartments and suites, the 
Heights possess a certain 
quality that we will always re- 
member. 



Joseph Plurad 
A&S '95 






k.ilhmi Bishop 



76 Around Campus 




Far Left: The Dustbowl is undoubtedly 
the most popular location on campus, 
leading students from class to lunch and 
back. 

Left: Students always find time to stop 
and see what vendors are selling in the 
McElroy lobby. 

Below: The hardest lesson to learn at 
BC is how to climb Higgins stairs with- 
out having a heart attack. 



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Far Left: Whether going home or to 
class, the tree lined walk from Main 
Gate to Gasson Hall is rarely empty. 

Left: The Quad is one of the more 
popular places to stop, socialize, and 
lend a helping hand. 



Amy Lulz 



Around Campus 77 



Spirit 



"WeAre...BC! M : 
Pride on the Heights 



Let's go Eagles!" echoed 
throughout Alumni Sta- 
dium each time the football 
team took the field. At the 
same time, maroon and gold 
pompoms shook over every 
student's head in the section, 
as they showed their spirit, en- 
thusiasm, and pride in our 
school. 

Propelled by recent 
success, attending BC sporting 
events was one way students 
showed support for both our 
team and our school. It was 
common for students to dress 
in our school colors and fill the 
student section, especially for 
the big games this season. At 
times, it was impossible to get 
a student ticket because games 
were sold out as students felt 
the need to support their team. 
Pride ran so strong this year 
that many students took to the 
road to show their pride for the 
Eagles by going to Syracuse, 
Rutgers, and especially Notre 
Dame to witness the nail-biting 
sequel to the "Holy War." 

Back on campus, the 
band and cheerleaders did their 
part in adding to the thrill of the 



games by getting the students 
involved in the excitement. 
Their participation in pep ral- 
lies before important games 
only added to BC's spirit and 
united us in a common cause. 
Additionally, various campus 
clubs and organizations con- 
tributed to the spirit of BC by 
bringing people closer to- 
gether. As one student said, 
"It's important to be proud of 
where you go to school. I love 
to go to all of the home games 
and get involved in the activi- 
ties offered. Spirit is something 
that we all have in common 
and it makes college life more 
fun." 

Spirit is also shown by 
others who come and visit the 
Heights. It is not rare to see the 
stands filled with family mem- 
bers, alumni, faculty, and staff. 
The Boston College tradition 
gets passed on from genera- 
tion to generation. So whatever 
form it took, whether on the 
field or through an brganiza- 
tion, pride and spirit were ev- 
erywhere. It'sjustanotherpart 
of the tradition of Boston Col- 
lege. 



Brandi Stemerman 
A&S '97 




I— — ^^^HB 



7X Spirit 





Far Left: Members of the band's flag corps, when not 
performing at halftime, show their support for the 
Eagles. 

Bottom Left: The cheerleading at games evoked emo- 
tion, spirit, support, and pride for our team. 

Left: The BC Eagle and cheerleaders got students and 
other fans psyched up for each play. 

Below: This season, the football team played before an 
excited, enthusiastic, and sold-out student section. 




Spirit 79 



Tailgating 



The Tailgating 
Tradition Continues 



What rolls around every 
year during the Boston 
College football season? 
Enormous parties! Tailgating 
begins ritually before every 
home football game and con- 
tinues endlessly thoughout the 
night. BC students are awak- 
ened early Saturday morning 
to the sound of blasting music 
and loud screams which echo 
around the campus. Fans from 
all over the country return to 
Alumni Stadium each year to 
watch the Screamin' Eagles 
face rival teams. Excited 
people filed into campus early 
for six fall Saturdays to start a 
full day of tailgating. Rain or 
shine, hungover or not, every- 
one hit the party scene to so- 
cialize and show their Eagle 
spirit. 

Tailgates were all over 
campus, whether it was in Shea 
Field, the Robsham and Plex 
parking lots, or in the ever- 
popular Mods. These tailgates 
offered everyone a time to hang 



out, eat food, and of course, 
indulge in a drink or two! 

Boston College pro- 
vided plenty of action both on 
and off the field. The Eagles 
had a very exciting season this 
year, with the enthusiasm of 
the tailgates matching the en- 
thusiasm from the team. Come 
rain, as in the Miami and Tulane 
games, or come shine, the days 
were filled partying, dancing, 
and drinking, regardless of the 
outcome. Everyone mixed, 
mingled, and had a terrific time 
hanging out together. 

The 1993 Football sea- 
son brought tremendous 
matchups and raging tailgates. 
The fans this year were full of 
enthusiasm and spirit, which 
showed at every tailgate party. 
This age old tradition continues 
at Boston College year after year. 
All you need are a few friends, a 
full cooler, and the will to cel- 
ebrate. You have not lived until 
you have experienced a Boston 
College Tailgate. 



Kristen Pike 
SOE '94 




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Far Left: The "T" Party: a non-alcoholic alternative 
and addition to the traditional tailgate. 

Left: Alumni, students, family, and friends came 
together for every home game to celebrate and have fun. 

Below Left: Tailgating in the Mods: another long- 
lasting BC tradition! 




Courtesy of Debbie Carrasquillo 



Courtesy of Cherie Benoit 

Far Left: The Eagle stood watch over many action 
packed tailgates on Shea Field this season. 



Left: The rain did not stop these students from having 
a good time before the Miami game. 



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Beyond Boston College 



Getting Away from 
it All 



Some people may think that 
BC students do not venture 
off campus that often (slightly 
more than they get out of bed 
for a 9 o'clock class!). How- 
ever, that notion is quite contrary 
to popular belief. The environs 
surrounding the BC campus are 
filled with places that have be- 
come BC haunts, proving that 
students do go beyond the bor- 
ders of the Heights. 

Of course, there is usu- 
ally an underlying driving need 
that brings students out of their 
dorms. More than likely it is the 
craving for food. Topacifythose 
pangs of hunger, students head 
to the conveniently close 
Maddie's Market which sells 
everything from coffee beans to 
frozen yogurt (and is great for 
those late-night food runs!). 
White Mountain dishes up some 
amazing concoctions for those 
in the mood for a cool treat. If 
students should happen to wan- 
der farther down Comm. Ave., 
they will find almost anything 
they are in search of at 



Christy's, CVS, or Star Mar- 
ket. 

Dining out puts forward 
a whole other set of options. 
Down at Cleveland Circle, food 
and drink abound. CitySide, 
Mary Ann's, Chef Chow's, 
Pino's and the Ground Round 
are only a few of the choices. 
Dunkin' Donuts serves up a 
great cup of coffee and Lovin' 
Spoonful offers a less sinful 
alternative to ice cream. 

Entertainment, another 
reason for drawing students out, 
can be found at the Circle 
Cinema and the various video 
stores off campus. Next to the 
theatre lies a field perfect for 
soccer or baseball, or even 
catching some rays. Last, but 
surely not least, the many off 
campus apartments of students 
provide recreation of the party- 
ing sort. 

Obviously, BC students 
manage to find their way off 
campus. They experience and 
take advantage of what the 
neighborhood has to offer. 



Andrea Shaffer 
A&S '94 



Below: Cityside: The higher class, 
higher priced alternative to the com- 
petition across the street. 

Bottom: Chansky's is the store stu- 
dents head to for a last minute "treat" . 




K2 Beyond Boston College 



Left: Students often stop by Reservoir 
Wines and Spirits before throwing a 
party. 

Below: Mary Ann's is the place "where 
everybody knows your name," if you're 
from BC. 

Bottom: Everything the typical student 
at BC could possibly need can be found 
in one of these stores. 




Becky Yang 



Beyond Boston College 83 



Spiritual Life 



The Quest for 
Spiritual Growth 



One aspect of college life 
that might get overlooked 
amidst all the studying and 
partying is the spiritual element. 
However, here at Boston Col- 
lege, it is a prominent and ac- 
tive part of everyday student 
and faculty life. As a Jesuit 
community, the university hails 
a large Catholic population, but 
other denominations can be 
found among its many students. 
All faiths are accomodated 
through the availability and 
flexibility of numerous litur- 
gies around campus and vari- 
ous clubs such as the 
Intervarsity Christian Fellow- 
ship and Hillel. Masses are 
also celebrated daily during the 
week and Wednesday nights at 
Manresa House. 

Student participation is 
definitely not lacking. Not only 
are the masses usually filled, 
but students offer their time 
and services as Eucharistic 
ministers, lectors, and singers 
in the music ministry. Their 
service does not end there, but 
continues to extend beyond the 
groundsof Boston College with 
the guidance of the University 
Chaplaincy. 



The Chaplaincy enables 
the student community to further 
their spirituality. Its goal is to 
build the community within the 
university and in the world out- 
side its parameters. The foun- 
dation on which this community 
stands consists of personal val- 
ues, service, and justice. To 
accomplish this goal of com- 
munity, the Chaplaincy orga- 
nizes liturgies and various pro- 
grams designed to strengthen 
personal growth and to alleviate 
problems of injustice and in- 
equality. Weekend retreats and 
counseling are offered through- 
out the year to students as a way 
of encouraging self-awareness 
and to meet fellow students. 
Volunteer opportunities for un- 
dergraduates include the Appa- 
lachia Project, Urbanlmmersion, 
4 Boston, and pilgrimages to 
Ecuador, Belize, Mexico, and 
Jamaica. Graduates wishing to 
volunteer can find placement 
through the Jesuit Volunteer 
Corps. 

With such an extensive 
and varied network of commu- 
nity, it is easy to see why spiri- 
tual life at Boston College is so 
rich. 





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A&S '94 





84 Spiritual Life 







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Far Left: The BC Chorale provided the 
music for the Mass traditionally cel- 
ebrated at the beginning of the school 
year. 

Bottom Left: Some students partici- 
pated in the ceremony by leading the 
processional at the conclusion of the 
Mass. 

Left: Fr. Monan and the rest of BC's 
Jesuit community celebrated the Mass 
of the Holy Spirit, held in O'Neill plaza. 

Below: After the Mass, Fr. Neenantook 
some time to speak with students who 
attended the afternoon service. 



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Guests and Entertainment 



In Concert at 
Boston College 



After seeing a basketball or 
hockey game in Conte 
Forum, or eating in McElroy's 
cafeteria, it is hard to envision 
these as places of musical enter- 
tainment. This year though, these 
walls housed musical greats such 
as the Boston Pops and Ziggy 
Marley, and Big Head Todd, an 
aspiring newcomer to the musi- 
cal scene. "Play and they will 
come" seemed to be the 
catchphrase of the moment be- 
cause each group drew hordes of 
Boston College students. 

The "Pops on the 
Heights" concert featured John 
Williams, the Boston Pops or- 
chestra, and the Boston Col- 
lege Chorale. They started 
Homecoming weekend off with 
a blast by performing such well- 
known tunes such as the Star 
Wars Theme and BC's own 
Alma Mater. Not only did the 
concert provide an incredible 



evening of entertainment, but 
it helped to fund music schol- 
arships. 

Next on the agenda was 
Ziggy Marley and the Melody 
Makers. They brought a dif- 
ferent, but not any less spec- 
tacular, sound to the BC cam- 
pus. 

To close out the first 
semester, Big Head Todd 
played to a sold out crowd. 
Tickets were in high demand, 
prompting more to be sold and 
moving the show to a larger 
venue to accommodate the in- 
crease. 

Of course, there were 
many other options available 
to BC students for entertain- 
ment. The many performing 
groups on campus, musical and 
otherwise, scheduled many 
concerts and shows during the 
year, playing to thankful and 
enthusiastic crowds. 




*V 



Andrea Shaffer 
A&S '94 



j 



86 Ciucsts and Entertainment 



c L 

I 




Left: John Williams and the Boston 
Pops Orchestra received a standing 
ovation following their Homecom- 
ing concert. 




Left: Ziggy Marley and the Melody 
Makers did not let the enthusiastic 
crowd leave Conte Forum disap- 
pointed. 



Guests and Entertainment 87 



Homecoming Weekend '93 



Homecoming 1993: 
"Back to Boston" 



On the weekend of Septem- 
ber 24 and 25, the students 
of Boston College came to- 
gether to celebrate Homecom- 
ing 1993. The annual event 
kicked off Friday night with a 
much heralded concert featur- 
ing John Williams and the 
Boston Pops in Conte Forum. 
Students, families, friends, and 
staff were entertained at the 
sold out event by music such as 
the "Star Wars" movie theme, 
"Stars and Stripes Forever," as 
well as "For Boston." 

The excitement carried 
over onto the next day as BC 
took on the Temple Owls. The 
fans, ready after tailgating all 
morning, watched the Eagles 
slaughter their opponent, win- 
ning 66-14. The partying did 
not end there, however, as stu- 
dents took their enthusiasm 
into the afternoon as they pre- 
pared for more festivities. 
Students threw off their jeans 
and T-shirts in favor of more 
formal dresses and sport coats. 
The height of the weekend lay 
only a few hours ahead - the 



Homecoming Ball at the World 
Trade Center of Boston. 

The evening started off 
with pre-dance cocktail parties 
throughout campus. Students 
gathered together to snap pho- 
tos and mingle with friends 
before they went to the packed 
event. This year's theme, 
"Back to Boston," tempted 
students with delicious foods 
from five sections of 
Beantown: The North End, 
Cheers, Fenway Park, 
Chinatown, and Fanueil Hall. 
Not only could they sample 
the savory dishes, but they were 
enticed by the elaborate scenes 
depicting each section. Ev- 
eryone immediately headed for 
the crowded dance floor to 
dance the night away to the 
music of Mark Morris and the 
Cat Tunes. If anyone got 
thirsty, they could indulge at 
the various bars for a few more 
dollars. By the end of the night, 
it was evident that the entire 
weekend was a huge success, 
due to the tired, but happy 
smiles on everyone's faces. 



Kristen Pike 
SOE '94 



Below : With the city of Boston as a backdrop, hundreds of students 
danced the night away at the World Trade Center. 

Bottom: Even on the crowded dance floor, people found enough 
room to have their picture taken. 




• 



KX Homecoming 



Left: Fr. Monan addressed the sold-out audience which 
came to see John Williams and the Boston Pops Orchestra. 

Below: Stepping off the dance floor, a couple looks for a 
place to catch their breath and share a drink. 




Homecoming 89 



Partying 



Partying Hard on 
the Heights 



After the rough work and 
hard studying during the 
week, the student body is ready 
to relax and unwind. Here at 
BC, the best way the typical 
student knows how to do this is 
by partying the whole week- 
end, be it a tailgate, theme party, 
victory celebration, or simple 
get-together. 
Stu- 
dents gear up 
for the week- 
end beginning 
Friday after- 
noon by hang- 
ing out with 
friends and 
roommates, 
while making 
plans for the 
next few days. Off campus or 
in the Mods, by the early 
evening, it is not uncommon to 
hear music echoing all around 
you while students dart from 
room to room to finalize their 
plans. 

After a quick bite, it's 
off to the party, and hours upon 
hours worth of socializing, 
dancing, relaxing, and drink- 




ing. Off campus parties tend to 
be filled with underclassmen 
and quickly become crowded 
and hot. On campus, the par- 
ties are just packed and jump- 
ing, with the convenience of 
being in everybody else' s back 
yard. In either case, it is very 
easy to hop from one party to 
another if it 
gets boring. 
Each party 
offers a great 
opportunity to 
meet and 
mingle with 
close friends 
or people you 
just met in line 
for another 

Kathryn Bishop COlQ OnC 

Parties let students talk, sing, 
and dance their weekends away 
at their own pace, away from 
classroom responsibilities. 

By Sunday morning, the 
campus takes on an eerie quality 
because the most students can do 
is sleep in. Besides, the thought 
of classes and assignments due 
on Monday always bring us back 
to reality. 




Courtesy of Mark Khorsandi 

Above: Parties allowed students to 
come together and blow off a little 
steam after a hectic week of work. 



Kristen Pike 
SOE '94 



90 Partying 




Left: The weekends are a great time 
to just sit back and relax with good 
friends. 



f 



4 



y 




1! I 







1* A* * 1 



Courtesy of Amy Reed 

Above: Theme parties are always 
popular with students. Costume 
parties and 70's parties were among 
the more common themes this year. 

Left: No matter what time of the 
year it is, the Mods play hosts to the 
best parties on campus. Tailgate 
parties with bands tended to draw the 
most students. 




Courtesy of Michelle Schiano 



Partying 91 



1 993 Head of the Charles 



Fans and BC Crew 
Beat the Heat 



The 29th annual Head of 
the Charles Regatta took 
place on October 24, 1993. 
Unseasonably breezy, warm, 
and humid, more than four 
thousand rowers and over a 
quarter of a million spectators 
converged on the Charles River 
to witness the world's largest 
one day boating event. While 
the boaters navigated the windy 
and sometimes choppy expanse 
of water, fans and sight-seers 
lined the riverbank to cheer on 
their favorite teams, sample the 
various foods and products 
from vendors and sponsors, and 
to enjoy the beautiful weather 
and colors of the mid-autumn 
day. 

Starting from the Bos- 
ton University boathouse, the 
race course follows the Charles 
into Cambridge, just past 
Harvard, at Herter Park, yield- 
ing an approximately three mile 
course. Yearly, the Regatta at- 
tracts the most skilled and tal- 
ented atheletes and teams, in- 
cluding representatives from 
local boat clubs, universities, and 
of course, Boston College's own 
men 'sand women 'screw teams. 
Racing against the clock instead 
of head to head, entrants strive 



to achieve the best time for the 
course in 16 different events, 
depending on the age, skill, and 
number of rowers. 

Races spanned the 
whole day, with BC's men's 
crew team taking to the water 
in the third race of the day, 
while the women raced more 
than six hours later, both in the 
Championship Eights category. 
Both Eagle teams held their 
own, with the men finishing 
16th, and the women 26th in 
their respective races. Even 
the assistant men's varsity 
coach experienced some suc- 
cess, participating in the win- 
ning Olympics Fours team. 

Like Boston College, 
the Head of the Charles Regatta 
shares a rich tradition with the 
city. Though BC has partici- 
pated for only the seventh time, 
both teams have already estab- 
lished themselves as worthy 
contenders. It is this kind of 
spirit and motivation to excel 
that draws such dedicated row- 
ers back year after year to im- 
prove, and continues to bring 
the hundreds of thousands of 
people to Cambridge to watch 
and support them in their at- 
tempt. 



Joseph Plurad 
A&S '95 



Below: Before the race, members from each of BC's crew teams 
discussed their strategy to navigate the course. 

Bottom: The women's crew team rows past just some of the quarter 
of a million fans who came to see the event. 




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92 Head of the Charles 



Left: While in Cambridge to see the competition, many 
fans spent some time visiting the Harvard Square area. 




Head of the Charles 93 



Dorm Life 



Homes Away from 
Home 



In a nutshell, living on-cam- 
pus is a study in extremes. 
One could get up at 8:30 for a 
9:00 class, unless Newton was 
called home, have warm 
showers one day, ice-cold ones 
the next, or even eat campus 
food one year, but cook the 
meals in another. Obviously, 
living on campus had its good 
and bad aspects. 

Luckily, as the years 
progressed, the housing im- 
proved. Gone were the days of 
cinder-block rooms and com- 
mon baths. Instead, upper- 



classmen were treated to newer 
dorms, nicer walls, a new din- 
ing hall, kitchens and private 
bathrooms. Students moved 
into the dorms and decorated 
as if they were extensions of 
their own home, while others 
took advantage of their new 
found freedom to throw a few 
get-togethers between friends. 
Even with the occa- 
sional shortage of hot water, 
the dorms offered students very 
comfortable accommodations, 
preferred by most of the student 
body. 



Brandi Stemerman 
A&S '97 




Above: Laundry was one chore 
students had to deal with. On cam- 
pus, one quickly learned what days 
of the week and what hours ol'lhe day 
to avoid so they could get a working 
machine. 



Amy Lut/ 

Top: In college, a bed becomes more 
than a place to sleep. It's also a 
comfortable place to study. 
Ri>>ht: For those who lived in apart- 
ment-style dorms, washing dishes 
was another daily chore. 



94 Dorm Life 




Below: Though living off-cam- 
pus has its advantages, students 
had their share of problems as 
well, especially with the weather. 




Off-Campus Life 



Living in the Real 
World 



Rent bills? Utilities? Cook- 
ing for yourself? Cable 
TV! What is this? It's called 
off-campus living, something 
the majority of Boston 
College's junior class, and 
many sophomores and seniors 
experience at least once during 
their college years. 

Whether you live on 
Commonwealth Avenue, 
South Street, or Cummings, 
you know what it is like to 
learn to cook, have new neigh- 
bors that don't stay up until 
3:00 am like you do, and have 
a broken toilet that the landlord 
takes three months to fix. On 



the other hand, some of the best 
parties are held off campus with 
no pressure from RA' s (though 
it's not any better if the Boston 
Police comes banging at the 
door!). In addition, because 
you are rarely alone off-cam- 
pus, there are many neighbors 
who do stay up until 3:00 am 
like you do, and often become 
some of your closest friends at 
BC! 

Overall, living off cam- 
pus can be an experience that not 
only teaches responsibility, but 
offers freedom, making this part 
of the journey through college 
more enjoyable. 



Tracy Hofmann 
A&S '95 




■Ml Photos by Ann REgibboi 



Left: Off-campus students have to 
arrange to get to BC somehow. Many 
choose to take their chances with the 
campus bus system. 



Above: For those who could afford 
it, 2000 Comm. Ave. had luxury and 
the convenience of being one of the 
closest apartments to BC. 



Off-Campus Life 95 



Halloween 



Halloween Haunts 
the Heights 



Halloween is always an ex- 
citing holiday at Boston 
College. The Halloween spirit 
was felt on the Heights as stu- 
dents geared up for the ghoul- 
ish occasion this year. Stu- 
dents started the fall season off 
by decorating their dorm win- 
dows and doors with pumpkins , 
skeletons, and ghosts. This 
holiday decorum permeated the 
campus and created a very 
festive atmosphere. This year, 
a BC club sponsored a 
fundraiser which allowed stu- 
dents to buy "Ghost-o-grams" 
in the dining halls, and have 
these seasonal messages and 
treats delivered for an inex- 
pensive price. 

Because the Halloween 
weekend coincided with Par- 
ents' Weekend, students had a 
busy few days. After dining at 
favorite restaurants with fami- 
lies, students returned home on 
Friday and Saturday night to 
attend costume parties. These 
gatherings ran throughout the 
campus, as students dashed 
from one party to the next to 
avoid the rain. Though stu- 
dents partied the whole week- 
end, Halloween night was 
definitely the highlight of the 



weekend. Even though the 
holiday fell on a Sunday, it did 
not stop anyone from ventur- 
ing out. 

There were parties and 
celebrations all over campus, 
especially in the Mods. This 
year, students in the Mods 
hosted a unique event entitled 
"Mod Golf." Students went 
out in golf teams of four com- 
pletely decked out in Hallow- 
een attire. Screams of excite- 
ment echoed throughout the 
Heights as students hopped 
from Mod to Mod trying to 
escape the downpours. These 
Mod parties each had a specific 
decorative theme such as a ski 
resort or a pirate ship. Some 
people attending these parties 
were dressed in the traditional 
Halloween ensembles such as 
witches, clowns, cats, and 
ghosts, while others sported 
more unique costumes, dressed 
as Howard Stern, the Shoe Tree, 
and, of course, Mod golfers. 

Halloween definitely 
was a crazy night at BC this 
year. Despite the weather, ev- 
eryone made an attempt to par- 
ticipate in, and enjoy the week- 
end by dancing, partying, and 
howling the whole weekend. 



Kristen Pike 
SOE '94 



Below: Two of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles came out on 
Halloween to take on campus criminals. 

Bottom: Peter Panda was one of the many invited guests at a 
Halloween party for young children. 



96 Halloween 





Left: A few partygoers took a break from the action 
to compare costumes. 

Below Left : The pirates celebrated their good fortune 
before storming the campus. 



Courtesy of Ana Ferrer 




Courtesy of Kristen Pike 

Above: Off-campus parties are not 
uncommon, especially on Hallow- 
een. 

Left: The seven dwarves await the 
arrival of Snow White. 



Courtesy of Katie Dutch 



Halloween 97 



Christmas 



Celebrating the 
Holiday Season 



Christmas is the time for 
many things. At Boston 
College it is a time of year 
much anticipated by students 
and faculty alike. Amidst all 
the stress and studying for fi- 
nals, an air of excitement settles 
around campus. Strands of 
lights adorn windows from 
Newton to 
Lower Cam- 
pus, Christ- 
mas trees peer 
out of win- 
dows and 
suddenly 
sprout in of- 
fices, and 
sprayed snow 
covers any- 
thing that will 
stand still. The winter festivi- 
ties of snowball throwing and 
tray sledding also appear, 
weather permitting, that is. 

Aside from the hustle 
and bustle of classes and find- 
ing out who's next on the gift 
list, the focus still remains on 




the true meaning of Christmas: 
giving, caring, and peace and 
goodwill towards others. This 
can be seen in the traditional 
lighting of the tree in front of 
O' Neill Library, which brought 
hundreds of students together 
in the cold to celebrate the 
season, filling O'Neill Plaza 
with a glow of 
colored lights 
and Christmas 
carols, led by 
Fr. Monan 
and the Bos- 
tonians. 

Also 
representing 
the spirit of 
Christmas 
Marty Na g .e was the stand- 
ing-room only attendance at the 
Christmas liturgy at St. 
Ignatius, as well as the smiles 
worn by many people around 
campus. Students and faculty 
come together in these ways to 
celebrate the magic and share 
in the joy of the season. 



Andrea Shaffer 
A&S '94 











k-^^^r '■■'■■■ 

Wb ' ■■■■ 
■ 1 ■ 












Top: The Christmas spirit 
could be seen in the jolly faces 
that turned out for the tree 
lighting ceremony. 



Above: Santa Claus visited 
O'Neill Plaza to find out who was 
naughty and nice. All the good 
girls and boys received candy 
canes from Saint Nick. 



98 Christmas 






Left: The annual tree lighting cer- 
emony took place on a chilly De- 
cember evening, marking the begin- 
ning of BC's holiday season. 



Below: All members of the BC com- 
munity were enouraged to attend the 
ceremony, though some enjoyed it 
more than others. 




Christmas 99 



Senior Life 



The Class of 1994: 
The End of the Road 



Senior year. These are the 
times to remember! Spend- 
ing Wednesday nights at MA's, 
Thursdays at the Kells, week- 
ends in the Mods... 

Senior year has a bit 
more to it than that, though. 
There is the small luxury of 
only having to take four classes, 
and being the first on line to 
register for them. The Career 
Center becomes a familiar site 
as resumes, interviews and 
applications for graduate 
schools make way for future 
plans. Barron's guides for just 
about everything, including the 
GRE, GMAT, MCAT and 
LSAT, become regular features 
on the desks in O'Neill. 

On the lighter side of 
things, many events colorfully 
spotlighted out last year at 
Boston College. Homecoming, 
senior portraits and class rings 
are all seen as badges of "se- 
niority." There are also the 
inspiring memories of the 41- 



39 victory over a #1 -ranked 
Notre Dame team, witnessed 
by many seniors willing to 
make the 17-hour trip to South 
Bend. Following this was BC's 
first bowl win since the Doug 
Flutie era. 

We have seen the 
opening of two new dorms, a 
cafeteria, the Merkert Chem- 
istry Building and a revamped 
Rat. The beginnings of a 
parking garage and a renovated 
Fulton are what we will see 
finished as alumni. 

Coming in as fresh- 
men, we witnessed a construc- 
tion-free campus as we began 
a four-year journey on the 
Heights. Leaving BC, we take 
with us many things: the ability 
to grow academically and 
emotionally, to accept and 
adapt to change, to expertly 
maneuver around construc- 
tions sites, and especially the 
memories. What more could 
we ask for? 



Andrea Shaffer 
A&S '94 



Bottom: For many seniors, 
this year meant additional 
studying, both for graduate 
school entrance exams and 
potential job interviews. 



Below: The Career Center was 
often visited by seniors in order to 
find out what, if any, jobs would 
be available for them after gradu- 
ation. 




100 Senior File 




y of Jennifer Cunningham 



Senior Life 101 



Junior Life 



Almost On Our 



Own 



Junior year could be seen as 
a year of transition. For the 
most part, students came off 
the meal plan and had to cook 
for themselves, as they were 
either driven off campus or into 
the apartment-style dorms. 
This meant that they also had 
to first learn how to cook, and 
budget groceries into an already 
tight budget. Cooking-related 
fire alarms were not unheard 
of, and some students simply 
decided to eat out more often. 
Being almost totally 
"on their own" presented new 
challenges to the junior class. 



Dealing with landlords and 
utility and rent bills, shopping 
around for the best macaroni 
and cheese prices, the list goes 
on and on. 

Academically, the end 
is in sight. Students slowly 
completed classes towards their 
degree and began making plans 
for the future by preparing to 
take grad school exams and by 
beginning the search for po- 
tential jobs. Many students 
also celebrated their twenty- 
first birthday this year, exer- 
cising their new-found legal 
status and independence. 



Joseph Plurad 
A&S '95 




Below: Signs like these were very 
familiar to juniors living off campus. 
Those not lucky enough to get the 
right permit were promptly ticketed 
and towed. 




Left: No matter where they 
lived, the majority of juniors 
had to cook and clean for 
themselves. For many, it was a 
first. 



Above: For those who didn't have 
a car or didn't feel like driving, a 
lot of time was wasted wailing for 
a bus that took forever to come. 



Marly Naglc 



102 Junior Life 



Bottom: A student concentrates 
before making his shot. A pool 
room was just one of the many 
amenities in the new dorms. 

Below: Though there were long 
lines for dinner in the new dinina 



center, it was much easier to 
find a place to sit during lunch 
hour. 

Below Right: Video games were 
a staple for guys who didn't feel 
like aoina out on certain niahts. 




Ann Fit/gibbon 



Sophomore Life 



Moving On Up... 
To Lower Campus 



Gone are the days of being 
a freshman. Experience 
guided students this year in 
finding out where the better 
places to live were, what classes 
to take, and where the good 
parties were. One year also 
made a difference in actually 
choosing the classes and de- 
ciding where to live. Those 
lucky enough got early regis- 
tration times easily got into the 
morepopularclasses, while this 
year's class got to test out the 
new dorms instead of shooting 
for Walsh or Edmond's. Un- 
fortunately, those who didn't 



fare as well in the housing lot- 
tery again ended up on College 
Road. 

Of course, being a year 
older also brought added re- 
sponsibility. Sophomores were 
expected to declare majors and 
complete their core require- 
ments. Additionally, upper- 
level courses added to an already 
hectic college life. Again, stu- 
dents looked forward to the 
weekends so they could kickback 
and relax. However, no matter 
how one looks at it, sophomore 
year was just another step to- 
wards life in the real world. 



Joseph Plurad 
A&S '95 



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Amy Lulz 



Sophomore Life 103 



Freshman Life 



New Kids on the 
Block 



Dining in McElroy or Stuart 
and showering with flip 
flops, first-year students had to 
make the transition from home 
to college life. 

Freshmen, filled with 
excitement, come to Boston 
College with many expecta- 
tions. For some students, it 
was their first taste of freedom, 
far from the constraints at 
home. It was definitely a year 
of new experiences; college 
football games, new friends, 



socials, and finals helped make 
freshman year interesting. 
Many students were shocked 
by the stress of new academic 
pressures, but they survived, as 
did those who came before 
them. 

But as the freshman 
class packed up their stuff to 
leave in the spring, they took 
more than clothes home with 
them. They had friends and 
memories that would last a 
lifetime. 



Brandi Stemerman 
A&S '97 




Above: Eating in McElroy was one 
of the "benefits" of living on Upper 
Campus. 

Top Right: Like juniors and other off- 
campus students, freshmen living on 



Amy Lulz 

bus to commute back to their dorms. 

Right: Living on Upper, students 
have the convenience of getting up 
later than their Newton counterparts, 
but also had an extra flight of steps to 



Newton Campus had to wait for the deal with. 



104 Freshman Life 




Below: The bookstore offered 
everything the typical BC stu- 
dent needed. Fully stocked with 
hooks, clothes and other sup- 
plies, there were long lines at 
the beginning of each semester. 



McElroy Commons 




BC's Own "Boston 
Common" 




While a new student cen- 
ter remains in the plan- 
ning stages, McElroy Com- 
mons functions as the current 
Student Union. Not only the 
home of the bookstore, various 
eateries, club offices and the 
mailroom, McElroy also has 
the notoriety of being the home 
to the longest lines on campus. 
At the beginning of each se- 
mester, students can wait up to 
half an hour to pay for books. 
As the year progresses, more 
time is spent waiting in this 
building for food, mail, and to 
get in and out during lunch 
hour. All this is aggravated by 



the occasional vendors who 
take up position at the foot of 
the stairs in the lobby, and the 
people who decide to stop and 
chat with friends, or wait for 
their lunch partners. 

So, though the long 
lines and herds of people may 
appear to be slightly annoying, 
it is obvious that McElroy' s 
function for the student body 
has something to do with it. 
McElroy' s location in relation 
to everything else on campus 
has allowed it to become the 
social center and favorite 
meeting place on campus, or at 
least during the school week. 




McElroy Commons 105 



Work-Study Students 



Working to Learn, 
Learning to Work 



With the increasing cost of 
attending BC, it becomes 
more and more necessary for 
families to look for financial 
aid of any form. College work- 
study is one of the more popular 
options available to students, 
awarded according to their 
demonstrated need. At the 
beginning of every calendar 
year, hundreds of students be- 
gin the process of acquiring a 
job by filing their financial aid 
forms, and by the time they get 
to BC, they know if they were 
one of the "chosen". However, 
since the award does not guar- 
antee a job, just the right to 
look for one, the experienced 
job hunters sacrifice their first 
few classes of the year so they 
can get a head start and try for 
the more popular jobs. 

Because of the sheer 
number of students that BC 
does employ, it is almost im- 
possible not to encounter one 
at least once a week. Students 
are employed to work in vir- 
tually all branches of the Uni- 
versity, from the labs to libraries 
and everywhere in between. 



Checking ID's, serving food, 
and shelving books are merely 
the top of the iceberg when it 
comes to student workers. 
Many students also serve as 
secretarial assistants, labora- 
tory researchers, and even tu- 
tors. Without the invaluable 
help of the student employees, 
University operations could 
quite possibly come to a 
screeching halt. 

But no matter what the 
job, or the importance of it, 
most work-study students 
faithfully serve their duties, 
regardless of previous experi- 
ence. Additionally, something 
is gained in having a job while 
at school. Though the extra 
spending cash is very attractive 
to most students, participants 
come away with something 
more valuable. Because of the 
effort required, such students 
learn to budget their time and 
money more efficiently, learn 
new techniques and skills, and, 
even more basic than that, learn 
responsibility and experience 
that may even help them in the 
future. 




Joseph Plurad 
A&S '95 



Below: Students working at OCF 
always expect the chaos as students 
panic before exam time. 





Above: The Walking Escort service 
helped to ease students' minds about 
campus safety after dark. 



IOC) Work-Study Students 







Left: These students are gaining 
practical work experience in their 
field of study. 

Below: By working in the Foreign 
Study Office, this student helps people 
who are interested in going abroad to 
study. 



Amy Lulz 





Amy Lulz 



Left: Working quickly and effi- 
ciently, students keep the lines of 
hungry customers moving. 






■■ 



Work-Study Students 107 



Campus Food 



Variety is the Spice 
of Life 




The never-ending quest for 
an identifiable meal con- 
tinues as students pour into the 
McElroy dining hall for an- 
other daily experience. The 
atmosphere holds a certain 
mystique, filled with mixed 
emotions over the selection of 
entrees. And so passes another 
uneventful 
meal in the life 
of a typical 
college stu- 
dent. 

How- 
ever, there are 
many other 
options avail- 
able to the 
Boston Col- 
lege student. 
The Eagle's Nest is great for 
grabbing a quick sandwich for 
lunch, and there's always the 
Rat in the basement of Lyons 
Hall for those who want to ex- 
periment with grease and oils. 
For upperclassmen, Walsh Hall 
was a popular place to grab a 
bite to eat, socialize, and catch 
a TV show, courtesy of the big 




screen TV by the entrance. 

Walsh's successor, the 
new dining facility by the new 
dorms, opened after the se- 
mester break, giving students 
new options to choose from in 
their dining adventures. The 
huge variety of eateries in the 
building was expected to in- 
crease 
student's on- 
campus eat- 
ing habits in a 
positive man- 
ner. Students 
eagerly 
awaited the 
grand open- 
ing, welcom- 
ing the new 
AmyLutz changes. 
Although campus food 
is far from Mom's home cook- 
ing made with love, it isn't quite 
as bad as we try to make it sound. 
Maybe, with the addition of the 
new dining hall, the college-food 
experience will rise to a whole 
new level of enjoyment. It also 
makes us appreciate the home- 
cooked meals much more. 




Brandi Stemerman 

A&SV7 



Top: The dining halls on campus 
provided food as well as a place for 
lively conversation among friends. 

Above: With the arrival of Dunkin 
Donuts and Friendly's ice cream to 
BC, students have to wait in line 
much longer for a cup of coffee or a 
sweel treat. 



I OX Campus Food 



Below: Students are bound to wait in 
line if they wait until the peak hours to 
grab a bite to eat. 




Campus Food 109 



The Plex 



In Search of the 
Perfect Body 



Walking a stairway to no- 
where, armed only with 
a walkman and a bottle of wa- 
ter, a committed student contin- 
ues to strive for excellence. But 
this war is not being waged on 
the academic battlefield, but at 
the Plex, where calories are the 
enemy and physically fit person 
is the victor. 

The 
Plex is a popu- 
lar place for a 
quick game of 
racquetball af- 
ter class or lift- 
ing weights 
with friends. 
The Plex' s full 
complement of 
options has 
something for every athlete of 
any skill level. A place conve- 
nient for all students to burn off 
a few pounds, only motivation 
(or the lack of it) stands in the 
way of achieving one's goal. 

Motivation runs very 
high towards the end of Febru- 
ary as the frantic panic sets in: 
Spring Break starts in afew days. 




Students head in droves for the 
wall of Stairmasters in the hopes 
of dropping the weight gained 
since Thanksgiving and Christ- 
mas Breaks, trying to lose a few 
pounds before flying away to a 
tropical vacation. In the midst of 
winter, the spandex, shorts, and 
T-shirts come out of the closet. 
No sacrifice is 
too great in the 
quest for the 
perfect phy- 
sique. 

Others 
come too, 
mostly to 
watch this 
yearly phe- 
nomenon. 
Sometimes, 



Ann Fitzgibbon 



it's no accident that the basket- 
ball from the pick-up game just 
happens to pass through the cur- 
tain into the aerobics class, or 
that there are people working out 
so close to the game. However, 
regardless of the student's 
agenda, be it business or plea- 
sure, the Plex has something to 
offer any interested party. 






Brandi Stemerman 
A&S '97 





mm 



'■.(■& 



y 



110 The Plex 



Left: Nautilus machines are an ef- 
fective way to build muscle tone. 
Students felt that the $10 pin fee was 
a worthwhile investment. 




Amy Lulz 




Amy Lutz 

Above: Many students fit exer- 
cise into their busy schedule by 
utilizing their workout time for 
study. 

Left: The wall of Stairmasters is 
the most popular form of exercise 
at the Plex. It was often difficult to 
find a free machine to use. 

Far Left: Jimmy makes a trip to 
the Plex more pleasant as he meets 
each student with a smile and a 
friendly greeting. 



Brandi Slcmcrman 

Opposite Page: In bad weather, 
students found it more suitable to run 
indoors on the track than around the 
reservoir. 



The Plex 111 



Transportation 



Getting From Here 
HI to There II 



How do we get there?" is 
a question that never 
seems hard to answer at Bos- 
ton College. There is a plethora 
of transportation options for 
any BC student. Ifyouwantto 
get somewhere on campus, you 
can always walk, though it 
might be just as easy to hop on 
the BC bus 
service, this 
year spon- 
sored by Mini 
Coach of 
Boston. 
"Mini" is the 
key word 
here, but even 
though the 
buses are 
smaller this 
year, the friendly drivers and 
relatively frequent pick-ups 
make it a favored choice in 
getting to campus, Newton, 
Cleveland Circle, or any off- 
campus location. 

Of course, the accessi- 
bility of the B-Line T is indis- 
pensable when it is necessary 
to visit your favorite bar on 
Harvard Ave. or you best friend 
at BU. However, if downtown 
is yourdestination, the D-Line 




is the quickest, and well worth 
the extra fifteen cents. 

Having a car or a friend 
who has one, can make trips to 
the grocery store as easy as 
pie, and road trips a joy. How- 
ever, having a car causes park- 
ing headaches on and off cam- 
pus, especially considering all 
the construc- 
tion on cam- 
pus and re- 
strictive regu- 
lations in the 
local neigh- 
borhoods. 
Creative 
parking skills 
are a must, but 
don't expect 
Many Nagie tne semester 
to go by without a few tickets 
added to the other expendi- 
tures students have. Simpler 
modes of travel, such as mo- 
torcycles, bikes and roller- 
blades are ways to beat the 
traffic headaches, and are fun 
ways to get around campus as 
long as it is not too cold or rainy. 
Therefore, the answer to 
the question "How do we get 
there?" is fairly simple. It's any 
way you like! 




Tracy Hofinann 
A&SV5 



Ann Fil/cibbon 



Above: Bikes provided an alterna- 
tive method of transposition for those 
who couldn't wait for the bus. 

Right: Students often plan their 
schedules around the bus route, 
whether to Newton or Cleveland 
Circle. 



12 Transportation 



Left: A cab may be fast and easy but 
you can't beat the price of the T. 




Marly Nagel 



Transportation 113 



Construction 



Building a Better 
Boston College 



Last year, it was the pile 
driver pounding in the 
ground that you could set your 
watch to. This year, students 
were spared the agony of hav- 
ing to deal with the construc- 
tion alarm clock, with the work 
moving to different areas of 
the campus. Because we were 
saved from the explosions 
caused by the blasting next to 
O'Neill Library does not 
change the fact that most stu- 
dents currently at BC have dealt 
with construction since their 
arrival, be it four years or four 
days. 

As the finishing 
touches were added past the 
check-in date to the new dorms, 
70 and 90 St. Thomas More 
Drive, work began or contin- 
ued on the other campus 
projects. The new dining cen- 
ter, slated to open for the sec- 
ond semester was given a 
beautiful brick patio as the the 
interior was prepared for the 
long-awaited food court. 
Across the street, what has 



come to be seen as a campus 
crater will soon turn into a 
parking garage to alleviate the 
neighborhood parking situation. 

While it may seem that 
Lower Campus is center of cam- 
pus construction (or destruction), 
Middle Campus is trying to draw 
attention by showing off a few 
projects of its own. When every- 
one thought that the construc- 
tion would end when Devlin was 
finished, in came the equipment 
to begin work on the expansion 
and renovation of Fulton Hall, to 
be finished within two years. 
Not even the St. Mary's rose 
garden was spared, temporarily 
replaced with a parking lot due 
to the lack of space elsewhere on 
campus. 

Nevertheless, students 
take all the inconveniences and 
modifications in stride. They 
deal with the parking problems, 
dirt, noise, and shuffled offices 
and classes, because they know 
that it's all in an attempt to 
make a campus that we can all 
be proud of. 



Joseph Plurad 
A&S '95 




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Christie Ccrriilo 



Top: Due to the lack of parking places 
available on campus, the work on the 
new parking garage was begun with 
the hopes of meeting the students' 
needs. 

Above: Fulton Hall began its renova- 
tions as the roof was removed for 
plans for a more modern building. 



1 14 Construction 





Left: New and improved housing 
was essential to the growing demands 
of Boston College. New dorms were 
built to better deal with the increas- 
ing on-campus population. 

Below: Students were excited about 
the opening of the new dining facility 
and tolerated the problems associ- 
ated with the added construction. 



Cluudetle Buulisla 



Chrislic Cerralo 



72ZT 



TV 



TEMPORARY PARKING 

DURING GARAGE 

CONSTRUCTION 

GARDEN WILL BE 

RESTORED 

IN SPRING 



\ 



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Chrislic CerTalo 



Left: Construction on campus had its 
consequences as the rose garden was 
sacrificed in the name of progress. 
Signs posted around campus were a 
familiar sight to students. 



Construction 115 



A Day at Boston College 



Good Morning 
Boston College! 



Right: 7:44 am. Mara Stein beats 
her roommates to the bathroom and 
gets the chance to completely blow 
dry her hair before leaving for the 
day. 

Below: 7:15am. Student teacher Jen Bottom Right: 8:51 am. Ed 

Menon gets up early to clean the new Vamenta, a late riser, has just enough 

snow off her car so she can get to time to brush his hair and his teeth 

work on time. before class starts. 





\() A I Jay al Boston College 




A Day at Boston College 



A Day at Boston College 



Just Another Day in 
Paradise 



Below: 12 Noon. With all of the tables 
in O'Neill Library occupied because of 
the lunch hour and students in between 
classes, one student set up camp in the 
only other available place - among the 
quiet stacks. 





Amy Lulz 



Right: 1:30 pm. While some students 
attentively listen to the professor's lec- 
ture in a classroom in Carney, others 
found time to catch up on some sleep. 



Em 



MB 

m 



■ 



IX A Day at Huston College 





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Matthew West 



Left: 3:40 pm. Because of the bad 
weather, a late bus made the normal 
"commute" even worse. Much of the 
crowd waited for more than 20 minutes 
for the bus, only to find that most of the 
seats were already taken. 

Below: 4:17 pm. A student meets with 
her professor to find out how she can 
improve on the essay she handed in, 
listening carefully to her professor's in- 
structions. 





Left: 5:03 pm. After doing his wash last 
night and letting the clothes air dry, this 
student used the rest of the afternoon to 
fold the clean clothes and do another 
load. 



Maura Nicholson 



A Day at Boston College 1 19 



A Day at Boston College 



At the End of the 



Day. . . 



Right: 6:27 pm. Ivan Alexander 
reads The Heights before deciding 
what to do later in the evening. 

Below: 7:43 pm. Patrons wait in line 
for food at Conte Forum. They hoped 
to beat the crowd, but ended up 
waiting anyway. 





I 




Right: 8:23 pm. Though the fans had 
their minds on other things at times, 
the hockey team was busy skating to 
a 3-3 tie with UMass-Lowell. 



Amy Lutz 




120 A Day at Boston College 





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Maura Nicholson 



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Left: 9: 15 pm. Before heading out for 
the night, this student puts the finishing 
touches on his paper due on Monday. 

Below: 1 1:25 pm. Amy Lutz heats up 
Pop Tarts for everyone in the apartment 
as a late-night snack. 




Left: A bunch of seniors officially 
kick off the weekend with a visit to 
Cityside to relax and drink with their 
friends. 



Day at Boston College 121 



*$t 







Because of the weather, Activities Day this fall was 
held in Conte Forum instead of the Dustbowl. This 
inconvenience, however, did not deter students from 
flocking in and signing up for the various activities on 
campus. It was apparent that students were eager to 
become involved, whether it be as an athlete on a club 
sport, a volunteer in a service program, or a voice in a 
singing group. These activities were great in number and 
diversity, but they all fostered a sense of pride and a spirit 
of dedication and commitment. Despite the pressing 
time commitment many activities called for, we found 
satisfaction in the work, for this was a chance for us to 
meet new faces, to give of our time and talent, and to 
possibly make a difference. 



















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Amy Lutz 




Kalhryn Bishop 







u.g fb . c. 




( I he University Government of Boston College is 
-L organized in order to provide students with a 
vehicle with which to voice concerns and opinions to the 
university. UGBC works to inform students about 
programs available through the university, and assists 
students in carrying out worthwhile projects around 
campus and the BC community. 

Through the efforts of the executive cabinet, members 
of The Activities Funding Committee coordinate and 
schedule lectures, concerts and UGBC sponsored events. 
Attempts are made to attract a diverse array of guests in 
order to ensure meeting the tastes of a wide variety of 
students. 

Service plays an integral role in UGBC's goals for the 
university. In addition to reaching out to the community 
on their own, they provide support and funding for 
smaller organizations on campus in order to assist these 
clubs with their contributions to the school. The Senate, 
comprised of eight representatives from each class, 
serves as the legislative branch of UGBC. Together, 
members work to represent their student body, and 
create a cohesive college environment. 



124 U.G.B.r. 




«CI 




U.G.B.C. 125 



Leadership 



O tudents of Boston College have 
Ly demonstrated their ability to 
assume the leadership role 
throughout campus and beyond. The 
activities involved are diverse, but 
they all require commitment and 
confidence. There are several or- 
ganizations on campus that try to 
foster this spirit of leadership among 
students. 

The Emerging Leader Pro- 
gram (ELP) gives students the op- 
portunity to become involved dur- 
ing their freshmen year. Students 
attend a retreat even before school 
begins, and take part in workshops 
throughout the year. 

Another program is the Jenks 
Leadership Program which was es- 
tablished in 1967. Juan Simon, the 
assistant director, became involved 
in Jenks because he identifies "with 
the values which the organization 
stands for, which is the relationship 
between leadership and service. 
With leadership comes responsibil- 
ity towards others, employees, team 
members, and the rest of society, 
which implies a commitment to 
service." Some of the activities the 
group sponsors during the year in- 
clude a Freshmen Year Experience 
and a Hunger Relief in which 
members raise money to help soup 
kitchens and other local programs. 




126 Leadership 





Leadership 1 27 



Student admissions 



^Program 



( I he first impression Boston College students 
-*- receive of the university can be traced back to 
their experiences from four years ago, when they 
stepped on campus and were greeted by a Student 
Admissions Program volunteer. It is this student 
organized, and entirely volunteer run organization 
that helps prospective students with their decision 
whether or not to attend the university. Through a 
variety of programs, students are able to represent 
Boston College, and meet the applicants for admis- 
sion. 

The variety of ways to get involved are numer- 
ous. One may choose to greet prospective students 
while they await their interview, return to their 
home town in order to discuss opportunities avail- 
able at BC, give tours to students and family members 
who wish to orient themselves around campus, or 
actually conduct the interviews that are often used 
in admission decisions. Whichever way a student 
volunteer decides to become involved, one thing is 
certain, the person has a strong tie and dedication to 
the university. The fact that over 800 students give 
their time and effort to make SAP the largest volun- 
teer organization on campus, reflects the admira- 
tion and love of Boston College held by many. 

This year the Student Admissions Program has 
changed locations. After years of being located in 
Lyons Hall, the office has expanded and been 
updated, donning a new image. Located on the first 
floor of Devlin Hall, it now accomodates a greater 
number of students; while at the same time, portray- 
ing a more sophisticated image. As a student's first 
impression of the university, it is an impressive 
introduction to many things being offered at Boston 
College. 



J 




128 Student Admissions Program 




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Student Admissions Program 129 



Kiilhryn Bishop 




fr- 1 very Monday morning, Boston College students 
I J get up with the comforting feeling that The Heights 
is waiting for them in the McElroy lobby. The Heights , 
Boston College's independent student weekly newspa- 
per is an important part of life around BC. It informs the 
entire BC community of campus events and issues. 

While national and international news is not the 
major interest of The Heights, issues of general interest 
and importance can always be found. News, reviews, 
sports, features, and business are the main sections of the 
paper. From feature stories to editorials, from "Top Ten 
Lists" to "Voices from the Dustbowl", The Heights 
always gives students something to talk about. 

The Heights is one of BC's largest organiza- 
tions, and is entirely self-supporting. Students take part 
in every aspect of the paper, be it writing, photography, 
copy editing, advertising, business management, or 
layout. The job of running and putting together a 
newspaper is not an easy one, yet the Heights staff 
successfully rises to the occasion each and every week. 

The Heights brings the concerns and needs of 
students out into the open. It tries to foster the discussion 
of pressing topics, such as educational concerns, social 
events, and administrative decisions among both the 
students and faculty. The Heights keeps everyone 
informed and aware of current issues that effect the 
Boston College community. 



30 The Heights 





The Heights 131 



Styi 



us 



rr 



CI /"ave you ever read a book and 
t/L enjoyed it or have you ever 
seen a great picture in a magazine 
and fell in love with it? Stylus gives 
you the chance to tell others about it. 
Stylus is a literary journal that has 
been published twice a year since 
1882. The journals are filled with 
creative poems, short stories, pho- 
tography, and other works of art. 

Stylus' s philosophy is based 
on creativity and self expression. It 
is famous for its student authored 
literature and art. Stylus gives any 
Boston College student a chance to 
submit their own personal creation 
with the hope that it will be pub- 
lished. While Boston College ad- 
ministration does have a hand in 
what gets published, Stylus mem- 
bers and other Stylus supporters 
advocate the freedom of expression. 
The resulting journals are always 
exquisite pieces of literature that 
can captivate the reader. 



J/ 





132 Stylus 



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f~7 /"ave you ever wondered what would be the best way 
»_/ L to let the B.C. community know about your club's 
scheduled event? Well, the C.I.A. might just be the place 
for you. Yes, B.C. has its own C.I.A. - the Campus 
Information and Activities office. This new office was 
created in place of the former Student Programs and Activi- 
ties Center (SPAC). It has taken on specific tasks aimed at 
offering B.C. organizations a source of communication 
with one another. 

Through a system of team work, the staff publishes 
a bi-monthly calendar highlighting student and faculty 
activities. This all-inclusive calendar offers information 
about club meetings, theater productions, movies, on-cam- 
pus lectures, and other B.C. activities. 

Also sponsored by the C.I.A. office are the very 
popular Thursday Night Cafes held in the Dunkin Donuts 
cafe in McElroy where C.I.A. has hosted such well-known 
campus groups as My Mother's Fleabag, the Bostonians 
and others. 

C.I.A. has also concerned itself with the leaders of 
the various campus organizations. Keeping in mind that 
being in a leadership position is not always easy, the C.I.A. 
publishes a Student Leaders Newsletter through which 
these students are offered some helpful hints on leadership 
skills. Most importantly, the role of the C.I.A. office is to 
encourage student involvement in the wide range of activi- 



C.I.A. 133 



^Theater SXrts 




Melissa St. Hilam 



fr 



One of the most popular and oldest traditions at Boston 
College is theater arts. There are a variety of ways that 
students can get involved in plays, both from an acting as well 
as from a backstage standpoint. Over the years, new compa- 
nies have formed until the theater has become one of the 
largest groups of students in activities on campus. 

The University Theater of Boston College involves a group 
of students and faculty who put on four plays and musicals 
each year. These productions are directed by faculty from the 
theater arts department and acted in by students. Students are 
able to help with most aspect of the productions including 
stage management, set construction and costume crew. Most 
plays are performed on the Mainstage at Robsham Theater 
Arts Center. This year "Dracula" and "Brighton Beach 
Memoirs" were among the University Theater selections. 

The Dramatics Society of Boston College is the oldest 
student run organization on campus. They usually perform in 
the Bonn Studio and are directed and produced by students. 
Students become involved in every aspect of putting on a 
production, from acting and directing, to lighting and set 
design and box office management. This year included such 
plays as "12 Angry Men" and "Vinegar Tom." 

...Continued on page 136 

134 Theater Arts 




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♦ 
















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Melissa Si. Hilairc 



Theater Arts 135 



theater [Arts 



...Continued from page 134 

The Contemporary Theater of Boston 
College is a student run independent the- 
ater company devoted to producing plays 
dealing with contemporary moral and 
social issues. The company normally 
presents four student-directed plays each 
year in the Bonn Studio or in other places 
on campus. 

The Children's Theatre Company of 
Boston College is a small group of stu- 
dents who use their improvisational skills 
to entertain children. This group performs 
for the young in the Boston College 
community as well as in greater Boston 
area. 

The People's Performing Arts Com- 
pany is a cultural awareness performance 
group. It's purpose is to promote cultural 
awareness throughout the Boston College 
community. Original material is per- 
formed and speakers are sponsored. 

There are a variety of ways to get 
involved in theater at Boston College. 
While each of these different groups has 
a different outlook on the way entertain- 
ment is presented, they all have one thing 
in common, a love of the performing arts. 



136 Dramatics Society 




A 






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etf $ 







Contemporary Theater 137 



My 
Mothers 
fleabag 




fit fter a long week of classes and responsibil- 
«_/L ity, the best way to unwind is to share a good 
laugh with friends. My Mother's Fleabag provides 
just the right dose of humor and outlandish acts to 
entertain even the most skeptical person in atten- 
dance. This improvisational comedy troupe, 
comprised of Boston College students, performs a 
few times each semester. The shows are known to 
fill O'Connell House to capacity. 

The audience plays an integral role in the perfor- 
mance, providing the ideas and suggestions that 
help the comedians create wild scenes and side 
splitting laughter. As a result, the unique talents of 
the group, combined with the diversity of the audi- 
ence, allows each show to be a new and invigorated 
experience. The improvisational acts allow the 
Fleabag members to display their own sense of 
humor and creativity. The results are hysterical. 

The next time a wacky non-geographical loca- 
tion pops into your mind, make sure to take note, 
and share your idea at a Fleabag performance. 







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Amy Lutz 



138 My Mother's Fleabag 




Amy Lutz 




Mo... 

SHovelHead! 



CI /ello...Shovelhead is a student 
%J L run comedy troupe performing 
original material. They write their 
own scripts through a process of im- 
provising and brainstorming. This 
leads to a mixture of comedy sketches 
as well as some improvisation in their 
shows. 

Hello. . .Shovelhead usually performs 
one main show each semester at either 
O'Connell House or in Gasson. They 
have also performed at competitions 
and at Catch a Rising Star Comedy 
Club in Harvard Square. Their antics 
have created a wide following at BC 
and earned them the respect of comedy 
groups in other areas as well. 

Shows are always widely attended 
as everyone at BC loves to laugh. 
Hello. ..Shovelhead certainly accom- 
plishes that and more. 




Randall Tarasuk 



Hello... Shovelhead! 139 



R;tnddll Tarusuk 



University 
Chorale 



(~\- he University Chorale of Boston 

_/_ College saw its first new director 
in almost 4 decades this year. Dr. C. 
Alexander Peloquin's retirement began 
a search culminating with the selection 
of John Finney, the talented and ca- 
pable director of Boston's Handel- 
Hayden Society. This change took 
shape much to the pleasure of the 
Chorale's members as well as its au- 
diences. 

The 1993-1994 season began with a 
reborn charm as the chorale performed 
Gabriel Faure's "Requiem" and the 
"Cantique de Jean Racine." Their fall 
performance stunned audiences with 
the power and resonance for which the 
Chorale is so esteemed. 

The annual Christmas concerts were 
well received due to such performances 
as Pinkham's "Christmas Canata" and 
"Hallelujah" from Handel's "Messiah." 

Composed of about 150 under- 
graduates, graduate students, faculty 
and members of the Jesuit community, 
the Chorale is under the immediate 
direction of the Board of Officers. The 
Senior Officers are President Gary 
Lynn, Vice-President and Treasurer 
Cynthia Valentine, Publicity Coordi- 
nator Salvadore Liberto, and Social 
Director Christopher Fuller. 

For years the Chorale's talent has 
pleased audiences not only on and 
nearby campus, but also abroad in 
places like the Bahamas, Paris, Rome 
and Vatican City. This year the group 
performed in an AIDS benefit in Puerto 
Rico. 

Truly a talented and diverse group, 
the University Chorale has succeeded 
in pleasing audiences everywhere and 
is sure to do the same for years to come. 



V. 




140 University Chorale 




Puul llczel 




University Chorale 141 



^Bostonians 



T 



(H? t the fall a cappella concert, the first 
«^/L song the Bostonians performed was 
"Celebration", and a celebration it was. The 
group gave a top performance as usual, 
entertaining the crowd in every way. Their 
harmonizing and incredible talent have 
earned them the reputation as one of the top 
groups on campus, while their antics keep 
the audience alive, usually in hysterics, and 
always eager for more. At any given con- 
cert, you will find devoted fans braving the 
long lines and overcrowded conditions just 
to catch a glimpse of the group perform. 
And its all worth it. 

Aside from the concerts on campus, 
the Bostonians also travel to other colleges, 
and host an annual inter-collegiate Songfest 
in the spring. 

The Bostonians claim to be the oldest 
acappella group at Boston College. Whether 
this is true or not, one thing is certain, the 
Bostonians are here to stay. 




AmyLutz 




142 Bostonians 



J-kkffits 



men 




Kathryn Bishop 




1 1 CJ f eightsmen: more popular than Jesus?" This was 

^yX a recent headline of an article reviewing the Cafe 
performance of this all male a cappella group. It also sets 
the tone as to how crowded their performance was. 

Since their organization in 1990, the popularity of the 
Heightsmen has grown in leaps and bounds. Each perfor- 
mance brings more people in. Not coincidentally, most of 
the audience consists of the female population! 

The Heightsmen are made up of 1 2 to 1 6 Boston College 
undergraduate men who perform a wide musical repertoire 
that includes everything from cartoons to classics and rap to 
do-wop. 

In addition to the vocal talent, the Heightsmen also have 
an unerring sense of comic timing and use it to their benefit 
during comic interludes between songs, and sometimes 
even during, leaving the audience not knowing what to 
expect next. 

In the words of Heights staff writer Amy Gunderson, "So 
whether the fans are there solely for the music or the music 
and something else, The Heightsmen continue to be an 
impressive feature of life at BC. You do not have to be a 
groupie or a fanatic to enjoy one of their shows, but you are 
sure to have a new appreciation of a cappella after seeing a 
performance by the group." 



^V 



Heightsmen 143 



Amy Lm/ 



'B.C. S Harps 




C~Ty oston College's only female a 

±J capella group is sure to bring a 

smile to your face, and a tap to your foot. 

The BC Sharps are capable of thrilling 

audiences with their talent. 

In the few years they have been in 
existence, the Sharps have secured their 
place among BC's performance groups 
and attracted a large following. Aside 
from the excellent musical performance, 
the Sharps never fail to liven the crowd 
up with the comedic skits. 

The music ranges from gospel to mod- 
ern pop tunes. Music selection is based 
upon suggestions from friends and input 
from members. Their unique medley of 
voices will have you humming for days 
alter the performance. 



144 B.C. Sharps 




i, ,ii,., ,, iir 



"B.C. bOv! 



i 




Randall Tarasuk 




(~T) C. bOp! is a student run ensemble dedicated to 
_lJ the highest levels of instrumental and vocal jazz 
performance. This group of eighteen instrumentalists 
and six vocalists performs professional-level traditional 
and contemporary jazz selections as well as a wide 
variety of vocal jazz and popular selections. Their 
repertoire consists of over 50 songs from the 1940's 
through the 1990's and is designed to appeal to a variety 
of musical tastes. 

B.C. bOp! performs frequently throughout the 
year, both on campus and off. They have traveled 
nationally and internationally to such places as Mexico, 
Florida and the Bahamas. B.C. bOp! has also performed 
in New York's Carnegie Hall as well as at many other 
notable events. Each year, B.C. bOp! performs annual 
Christmas and spring concerts, hosts a high school jazz 
festival, and performs at many university functions as 
well as public events in Boston. 

From its beginning, B.C. bOp! has established 
itself as a hard working, top performance group that 
encourages the students in the ensemble to challenge 
themselves musically and to grow as a team. 



-4 



B.C. bOp 145 



rffie Acoustics 




( I he Acoustics? What are the Acoustics? You mean 

JL to tell me there's another musical group on campus? 
And another a cappella to top it off? The answer? YES ! 
The Acoustics have come to Boston College. 

B . C .' s newest co-ed a cappella group made their debut 
this year, and Boston College was ready for them! 

The Acoustics is composed of 8 women and 6 men. 
They blend music and comedy sketches into entertain- 
ment that does their predecessors proud. They even had 
their own well-attended Thursday Night at the Cafe 
which as we all know is necessary in the performance 
schedule of any B.C. musical group. 

Some songs from the Acoustics' repertoire included 
Steve Winwood's "Higher Love," K.D. Lang's "Constant 
Craving," the B52's "Roam," and "You are my Sunshine" 
(aided by helium balloons)! 

In the words of Guillaume C. Tourniaire in an article 
on their first Cafe, "...the singing of the 'Jefferson's' 
theme amongst the medley of TV tunes seemed to be 
aptly fitting. Cheesy as it may sound, the Acoustics' 
performance proved that 'they're movin' on up. ..they 
Finally gol a piece of the pie.'" 



J 



146 The Acoustics 





Voices of 
Imani 



( J he Voices of Imani are another 
-L singing group on campus that 
has attained greater status in recent 
years. They are a choir that per- 
forms at Boston College and repre- 
sents the university at churches, other 
universities and beyond. 

In an article on a performance 
Voices of Imani gave, Theresa Regli 
says, "The Voices of Imani, as they 
describe themselves, is a gospel choir 
which strives to reflect faith through 
their music - faith in their spiritual- 
ity; faith in the musical and cultural 
richness of black persons; and faith 
in their dynamic history as people of 
color. Their music ranges from Euro- 
Centric classics to American Negro 
Spirituals." 



Voices of Imani 147 



T)ance 
TLnsemble 




Kathryn Bishof 




/^Tne Boston College Dance Ensemble is a performing dance 
_L company on campus that is completely run, choreographed, 
produced and managed by the dancers themselves. The 45 or so 
members are intensely auditioned each semester by six elected 
officers that head the Ensemble. This year's senior officers are 
Jeannine Tsukahara, director, Mei Yee Lee, budget director, Suzanne 
Squarcia, production assistant, Cheryl Mantia, costume coordinator, 
and Elizabeth Steczkowski, publicity director. Kristen Moylan, 
assistant director, will graduate in '95. 

The dancers devote several hours a week to a rigorous agenda 
of technique classes and rehearsals. The Ensemble combines clas- 
sical ballet, tap and jazz, with contemporary modern and jazz chore- 
ography. Each dance is unique to the student choreographer, and 
expression of different styles and freedom of movement is a primary 
element in the performances. Their hard work and effort are culmi- 
nated in their bi-annual performances on the stage of Robsham 
Theater, and are appreciated by audiences every year with many sold- 
out shows. 



!4K Dance Ensemble 




K.illnvn Hisllnl 




Cjolden Tiagle 
dancers 



Kathryn Bishop 




Jn the short time since it was 
established, the Golden Eagle 
Dance Team has had a significant 
impact on the spirit department here 
at Boston College. A student run 
organization, the team performs at 
pep rallies, pre-game "tea parties" 
throughout the football season, and 
Boston College home football and 
basketball half time shows as well. 
The Golden Eagles' musical 
styles vary throughout their ap- 
pearances, from traditional jazz to 
more upbeat funk routines performed 
to the most popular songs. No matter 
what the selection, the dancers never 
fail to get the crowd pumping with 
their sharp, synchronized moves, all 
choreographed by the Eagles' two 
captains. Their fast pace, energetic 
steps always stimulate the fans and 
make for an enthusiastic and excit- 
ing atmosphere. 

A new event for the team 
this year was Midnight Madness on 
October 30. During this event, the 
team gave their audience a preview 
ofwhatisyettocome. With such an 
amazing turnout, there is no doubt 
that this will become an annual 
performance for these ambitious 
dancers. Likewise, with the teams 
increasing popularity, we can be sure 
to enjoy their shows more frequently 
in the future. 



Golden Eagle Dancers 149 



Kalhryn Bishop 



CHeerteade 



rs 



Cheerleaders. The word itself means 
EXCITEMENT! Excitement is 
exactly what B.C.'s Cheerleading 
Teams bring to every event that they 
attend. Always visible in front of 
every crowd at football or basketball 
games, home or away, these student 
athletes are filled with vim and vigor, 
and overflow with school spirit. They 
lead the crowd enthusiastically no 
matter what the game outlook is at the 
time, and their unflagging support gives 
the fans the pick-me-up they some- 
times need to carry their team to vic- 
tory. 

This team works as hard as any 
Varsity athlete. Cheerleading at B.C. 
requires a well-rounded squad. These 
athletes must work together as a team 
to perform stunts such as building 
pyramids, partner stunts, and those 
thrilling basket tosses that we all love 
to see. These skills are all combined in 
their performances during each game. 

Don't let all of the physical 
activity fool you. Cheerleading at B.C. 
is more than just physical activity. It 
gives the students themselves a chance 
to become involved in their school and 
community and to develop leadership 
responsibilities. The student officers 
of the squad are responsible for the 
organization of practice time, travel 
arrangements to away games, budget 
considerations, and fund-raisers. 

The Boston College 
Cheerleading Team keeps themselves 
very busy. They do not always have a 
great deal of free time, but they always 
manage to have a great time with what 
is given to them. 



150 Cheerleaders 








Kalhryn Bishop 







Kathryn Bishop 



Cheerleaders 151 



Kathryn Hi bop 



Screaming TLagles 
Marching ^Band 




Kathryn Bishop 



~N 



fit s the largest of any of the organized pep and spirit clubs on 
4^/L campus, the Screaming Eagles provide constant and energetic 
support for the teams at B.C. Comprised of over 130 wind and 
percussion players, color guard members, the Golden Girl, and a team 
of equipment managers, this very vocal and visible group is always 
ready to show their B.C. pride. This dedicated group of students 
performs at all home football games and pep rallies, providing pre- 
game and half time entertainment as well as spirited musical and vocal 
support throughout the game. 

The Marching Band typically performs at one away game 
each season, spending the weekend either at or near the game location. 
The Screaming Eagles also perform in several parades in and around 
the Boston area as well as in some local area events. This year 
includes not only the traditional Columbus Day and Labor Day 
parades, but also Halloween and Christmas parades. Be it in the 
neighboring Allston-Brighton Parade, a local Boston Christmas Pa- 
rade, or a more distant Rehoboth 350th Anniversary Parade, the 
Screaming Eagles always perform at the highest possible levels, often 
receiving commendations for their excellence. 

"The sound of our marching band throughout the stadium and 
Chestnut Hill spirits out players, excites the fands of all ages, and 
reminds our alumni how great it is to be back on campus. The Eagles 
Marching band is our sound of success !"-Chet Gladchuk, Boston 
College Athletic Band Director 

152 Screaming Eagles Marching Kami 





Kulhiyii Hi- 





Kathryn Bishop 



Kathryn Bishop 



Screaming Eagles Marching Band 153 



Intramural Shorts 




Patty Hezol 



( I or those interested in athletics, but do not 
-L have the enormous time commitment, the 
intramural program at Boston College offers an 
alternative. With over 23 different seasonal 
events, the program truly does have something 
for everyone. Over four thousand students par- 
ticipate each year. Intramural sports are avail- 
able to any B.C. student and are funded by the 
athletic department. 

The intramural program is headed by Terry 
Lavin, the assistant director at the Plex. How- 
ever, each sport is entirely student run. 

Each sport can have as many teams as neces- 
sary to accomodate interested students. Students 
can choose to sign with a particular team, be 
randomly placed, or even form their own team. 
Although some teams can get intense, the main 
emphasis is on having fun and, therefore, many 
games are just informal gatherings. Most ac- 
tivities are held at the Plex and some are at Shea 
Field and Contc Forum. 



^V 



154 Intramural Spoils 




Putty Mo/el 




Intramural Sports 155 



Club Sports 




Club sports play a large role in the 
lives of many BC students. The 
university has many well known sports 
such as football and basketball, but there 
are also many others known as club sports. 
A wide variety of club sports exist for 
people to get involved in. Boston Col- 
lege has everything from a women's rugby 
team to skiing, to karate. They even offer 
a men's ultimate frisbee team called the 
Spoon Heads. 

There is something for everyone if 
you desire to compete against other 
schools and want to make the time com- 
mitment to practice regularly. Many of 
these sports practice whenever they can 
get the fields and arenas they need to use. 
It is common to find practices scheduled 
for 1 1 PM or Midnight, simply because 
there are so many clubs using the facili- 
ties. 

Club sports are an essential part of the 
lives of many BC students and are an 
indicator of the wide variety of students 
and student interests that are here on 
campus. 



Rwa»5iwiar 




Paul Hwol 



156 Club Sports 





Club Sports 157 



WZBC 



In 


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anyfo | 



Maura Nicholson 




^ 



(^7~^\ o you like music? Of course you do! Next question: 
J-J where do you find it? Answer: 90.3 FM WZBC, 
Boston College's own radio broadcast organization. Voted 
"Best radio station in 1992" by "The Noise" and consistently 
ranked as one of the top collegiate radio stations by "Rolling 
Stone Magazine", WZBC is the prime place to tune in to for 
your listening pleasure. 

WZBC plays primarily alternative music. Offering 
such selections as old style hip hop, rap, techno, new age, 
middle eastern and Celtic music, WZBC has something that 
appeals to everyone. Outside of the campus arena, WZBC is 
very active in sponsoring concerts by various underground 
and local bands in clubs that we have all attended. 

As an official radio station of the Special Olympics 
and Jurassic Park, WZBC is the place to stop your dial. 
Twenty four hour weekends often occur and special requests 
are always appreciated. This station is not one to be forgotten 
or overlooked, the students who run the show just won't let 
that happen. 



I5X WZBC 




Minim Nicholson 




^Boston College 
^ilm Hoard 



( T_J ave you ever had one of those weekends 
*J L when you had nothing to do? You are tired 
of partying, going out and spending money. You 
have done everything, but are still craving some- 
thing more. How about spending a relaxing night at 
the movies, with an added bonus of no charge? 
Sounds too good to be true, right? WRONG! Every 
weekend the Boston College Film Board shows a 
popular movie free of charge. The movies are held 
Friday, Saturday, and Sunday evenings in the 
McGuinn Auditorium and the Barry Pavilion on 
Newton Campus. 

The group sponsers a variety of films, from 
recent releases to the tried and true classics. Some 
of this year' s films included, "Hot Shots, Part Deux", 
"Sleeping In Seattle", "Casablanca", and "The Fu- 
gitive". 

The Film Board is one of Boston College 
students' prize possessions, because if you're ever 
bored, go catch a movie. If you're not exactly bored, 
but just poor, go to the movies. There is always 
something to do when the Boston College Film 
Board is hard at work. 




Film Board 159 



T/R.l/E. 



The Recycling Etfor 



■Tor Ike Environment 




'@etUU»lSof T.R£.£\ 

to Kelp Ex-ftBLfl-Siofl. Qrow; Upwardly ! 




Phuong Bui 



/f 



f I he protection of our Earth's environment is a 
_L growing concern for all of us. The members of 
T.R.E.E. have tried to bring this awareness and recy- 
cling participation to Boston College's campus. Offi- 
cially known as The Recycling Effort for the Environ- 
ment, members work to promote recycling by stu- 
dents, faculty, and university administrators. 

The group works to maintain a successful recycling 
program by arranging for the placement of can collec- 
tion bins, paper recycling containers, and laser printer 
cartridge recycling notices. Working with the orga- 
nization known as Boston Can, they help to raise 
money for the homeless in order to assist them in 
receiving an education, job training and employment. 
As a member of the Environmental Action Center, 
they have been able to make a significant difference on 
campus. They continue to collect and recycle over 90 
tons of paper, and have helped to instill a sense of 
responsibility in the student body. Together we can all 
help to bolster the efforts of this dedicated group of 
volunteers. 



<. 



IfiO T.R.E.E. 






Women [ s 
Resource Center 



C I here is a doorway between the Eagles Nest and the 
J- campus post office. You have probably walked by 
it over a hundred times. The bulletin board just outside 
it is constantly flooded with a colorful array of pamphlets 
and flyers calling out for your attention. And yet, have 
you ever stopped to wonder what goes on beyond the 
doorway, or what those colorful sheets of paper are 
trying to tell you? This is a unique doorway that opens 
to a wide world of awareness and enlightenment for all 
B.C. men and women. You have found your way to the 
Women's Resource Center. Moving beyond the door- 
way and the bulletin board you will find that this is a 
place where everyone is invited to come together to 
confront the issues facing women today. Most impor- 
tantly, it is a source of women's empowerment. 

This year' s Brown Bag Film Series has recognized 
women in literature, such as Maya Angelou and Toni 
Morrison. Issues concerning women within a Catholic 
institution have been raised in another Brown Bag Series 
which focused on the struggles and journeys of women 
and spirituality. B.C. women have helped to strengthen 
one another through the peer support groups for Eating 
Disorders and Sexual Assault. The Women's Con- 
sciousness Raising group has offered women a time to 
come together to relate relevant issues on a personal level 
and offer ideas for activism on campus. Through AIDS 
awareness programs and a sexual assault network, the 
WRC has attempted to increase the accessibility of such 
programs to students. In addition, the Women's Re- 
source Center offers students educational resources 
through a library of over 1,500 volumes. 




Women's Resource Center 1 6 1 



Service 



CTy oston College has always 
J-) encouraged service to others . 
Through various organizations, stu- 
dents are able to give back to the 
school, the surrounding community, 
and beyond. 

The motto of the Gold Key 
Society is "Service and Sacrafice." 
Along with service, the Society also 
stresses the importance of friend- 
ship and a sense of community. 
Through various events, members 
develop strong friendships while 
achieving their goal of service. 

Circle K is an international 
service organization. Members 
work with the elderly, the homeless, 
the handicapped, and underprivi- 
leged children, as well as other local 
projects. Members also work on 
committess involving membership 
growth, publicity, and fundraising, 
and interact with members from 
other colleges. 

The newest service organi- 
zation is 4Boston, which was started 
in the fall of 1992. Members are 
chosen through an application and 
interview process. Once a member, 
the student must make a commit- 
ment each semester to give a few 
hours a week at a particular activity 
or organization. This can include 
tutoring, working with the home- 
less, and various local projects. 

...Continued on Page 164 




/ 



■ : 



/ 



// 






\ 



162 Service 




Service 163 



) of Emily Roy 



Service 



Continued from Page 162... 

The Chaplaincy sponsors many 
service oriented activities and organi- 
zations. For example, the Salt and 
Light Company designs, plans, and 
runs the religious retreats for Boston 
College students and others, such as 
area high school students and senior 
citizens. Members include BC stu- 
dents, as well as faculty, administra- 
tors and staff, and even students from 
area colleges. Some retreats, such as 
Freshmen Retreats and Bethany 
Weekend, are geared towards a par- 
ticular issue or goal. 

The BC Coalition for Peace is 
concerned with contemporary issues 
of world peace. They promote aware- 
ness of such issues through various 
activities that include host speakers, 
films, political lobbying, and discus- 
sions and meetings. 

The Appalachian Volunteers 
organize a trip to the Appalachian states 
each year to do service projects for 
those in need. 

The opportunties for service at 
Boston College are many and very 
diverse in their offerings. However, 
they all share one thing in common. 
They are all encompassed of Boston 
College students working for the ben- 
efit of people less fortunate than 
themselves. 




C\uini".\ hi ilio Oinnlaiiu'v Ofll 



164 Service 




Courtesy of Emily Roy 



Courtesy of the Chaplaincy Office 




Service 165 



O^Conndl 
Jiouse 




•TM^-N^ 



■ m 








Jn the middle of Upper Campus lies the 
O'Connell House, a mansion donated to 
Boston College in 1 937 by Cardinal O'Connell. 
Since 1972, it has been a student union and a 
center of activity. 

O'Connell House is run by a staff of under- 
graduates who are supervised by the Office of 
the Dean of Student Development. These 
students take on the responsibility of overall 
house operations, planning and publicity. The 
staff has the opportunity to use their talents to 
foster the personal development and social 
growth of the Upper Campus residents. 

The O'Connell House functions as a place 
for student organizations to meet, a study 
lounge, and a spot for lectures, films and plays. 
It also has a grand piano, a pool table, and a 
television and VCR for students to use. On 
weekends the House is reserved for program- 
ming by the staff to provide on-campus enter- 
tainment for the students. Breaking the Bar- 
riers Ball and the extravagent Middle March 
Ball, in which guests must compete to get 
tickets for the dance, are among the larger 
events the O'Connell House sponsors. It also 
co-sponsors events with other student groups 
that perform there such as The Bostonians and 
My Mother's Fleabag. 



166 O'Connell House 





Murray 
Jiouse 



CI J hen anyone at Boston College mentions "Spaghetti 
VV Supper" on a Thursday night, all minds turn to Murray 
House. There, for a couple dollars one can get a good meal and 
some great company in one of the most often overlooked spots 
on campus. 

Murray House is most often used as a place where commut- 
ers can call home during classes on campus. If you have a class 
at 9 o'clock and no more until 2 o'clock, O'Neill is boring, and 
there's only so much of McElroy dining hall you can take, a 
place can always be found at Murray House for relaxation or 
study in the daytime or at night. 

Contrary to popular belief, you do not have to be a com- 
muter student to enjoy the benefits of Murray House. The 
House is constantly running programs for the entire student 
body which are all announced on the Murray House board 
outside the bookstore in McElroy Lobby. 



V^ 



JJ 





Ann Fitzgibbon 






'.ilt.^y ^| 




1 1 uSISl II inn a 




-]F ! i r 



Cheryl Simrany 



Murray House 167 



S flaring 



Cultu 



res 



fit an important source of our 
»-/X education at Boston College is 
the people we meet. The diversity in 
culture, ideas and backgrounds en- 
hances our education and allows us to 
appreciate the differences in each other 
as individuals. The various interna- 
tional and cultural clubs at BC, through 
meetings, lectures, and various pro- 
grams, try to keep this goal in mind. 
Members of each group also gather to 
provide companionship and support. 
This is especially true among interna- 
tional students who try to make each 
member feel at home, while at the 
same time help each other to adapt to 
their new environment. 

Through social, cultural, and 
educational activities, the clubs seek 
to celebrate their unique culture and 
history. This year, Club Espanol orga- 
nized a fashion show. The club's 
president, Juan Simon described it as 
"a fun event for club members and the 
BC community and, more importantly, 
it raised money for the Oscar Romero 
scholarship." Everyone is encouraged 
to take part in the activities in order to 
further enrich and educate the BC 
community. The groups strive to make 
the community more aware of their 
tradition and customs in order that we 
learn to respect the differences in each 
other, as well as the similarities. 



J/ 



1 68 Sharing Cultures 




" "1 




- J 


i 


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1! * 4& r * ITl EMl 

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Amy Lulz 

Sharing Cultures 169 



c&iXNa 




fit s the Boston College community grows and the campus 
»~/L changes around us, we are now able to enjoy the 
benefits of a larger and more diverse student body. AHANA 
is one of the most prominent organizations on campus re- 
sponsible for promoting multi-cultural awareness and ap- 
preciation. The acronym stands for African American, His- 
panic, Asian and Native American individuals who through 
this organization are able to join together in order to represent 
many culturally rich backgrounds which comprise our student 
body. 

The group works closely with UGBC in order to foster a 
socially and culturally accepting atmosphere around the uni- 
versity. By hostng speakers and planning events that inform 
and enlighten students about the issues of prejudice and racial 
discrimination plaguing our society today, AHANA is able to 
set the example for a more tolerant and open-minded environ- 
ment. 

Through a variety of services AHANA offers tutoring, 
academic advisement, individual and group counseling, and 
career advisement. The goal that AHANA students strive to 
meet revolves around issues of acceptance. They hope to 
encourage a racially unhiascd attitude among all students. 
Together we can realize the dream for universal equality and 
the benefits of cultural diversity. 



170 A. H.A.N. A. 





Chrisiine Leonard 



A.H.A.N.A. 171 



^or the 
Children 



College students are commonly un- 
able to spend time with children due 
to the environment of a typical campus. 
However, Boston College students, 
through a variety of events and organiza- 
tions, are reaching out to the Boston 
community by working with children in 
a multitude of ways. Whether a student 
volunteers at the Campus School, or 
performs shows made for children, they 
can enhance the lives of children from 
local and inner-city areas. 

Height's Boys' and Girls' Club, a big 
sister/brother organization has expanded 
its outreach program, now enabling over 
50 inner-city kids to be matched with BC 
students. The volunteers participate in 
group events such as visits to Sturbridge 
Village, the Aquarium, the Museum of 
Science, bowling and roller skating. Other 
organizations such as Creative Kids, al- 
low Boston College volunteers to work 
with students at the Campus School where 
they assist students with a variety of 
programs in the arts. Children's Theater 
is a volunteer dramatics society geared 
towards the production of plays and skits 
for a young audience. Productions are 
elaborate, ensuring thrills for any audi- 
ence, especially the little ones. 

Tutoring programs are abundant and 
many students become involved through 
organizations such as Best Buddies, or 
the Golden Key National Honor Society. 
The PULSE program also offers a variety 
of ways to interact with children. The 
diverse opportunities around campus to 
form friendships with children enhance 
the lives of all involved and allow Boston 
College students to reach out and help the 
Boston community in small, but very 
important ways. 




Mm hi IViiiiik- 



172 For the Children 




Manu l J crunic 



For the Children 173 



Cbsing 



In a world where 
there is so much to 

be done, I felt 

strongly impressed 

that there must be 

something for me 

to do. 

- Dorothea Dix 



174 Closing 




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Closing 175 



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It was truly a moment in Boston College history when, 
on November 20, 1993, the football team pulled off an 
unforgettable 41-39 victory over the Irish of Notre 
Dame. The team finished off the season with a resounding 
New Year's Day win against Virginia in the Miami 
Carquest Bowl. Unfortunately, this would also turn out 
to be the last season under the leadership of Coach Tom 
Coughlin. It became apparent as the year progressed that 
the spirit of "ever to excel" was alive among Boston 
College athletes. By playing with heart and determina- 
tion, backed by hard work and talent, these athletes went 
against the odds and defeated powerhouse opponents 
such as Syracuse and Maine. The hockey team further 
demonstrated this spirit in their exciting overtime win 
against Harvard to capture the Beanpot title. The year 
was topped of by another significant victory when the 
university won approval to expand Alumni Stadium. 





A 




ports 17', 



Scholar Athletes 

Continue Educational 

Pursuits 



The importance of edu- 
cation in our society today comes 
in many forms, both on and off 
the athletic arena. Goal orienta- 
tion is not only a motivator of 
ambitious students, but those 
students whose role on campus 
serves a dual purpose: student 
and athlete. 

Senior linebacker Mike 
Panos best expressed the assets 
of both realms of student and 
athlete by emphasizing goal 
orienttation, and commitment to 
achieving a set number of goals 
per week whether those be per- 
sonal, academic, or athletic. 
Among motivating forces, "a 
person becomes challenged to 
balance both an academic and an 
athletic commitment," said Mike 
Panos. Linebacker Steven Boyd 
felt that he has also gained in 
many ways as part of the football 
program. Boyd said, "interacting 
with different people, and learn- 
ing to deal with personality 



types," is a lesson he has learned 
both on and off the field. Athletes 
felt that Boston College has been 
zealous in bringing academics to 
the forefront of the campus' ath- 
letic agenda. 

Aside from the advan- 
tages of being a scholar-athlete, 
realities have set into many as 
they chose careers off the field. 
Panos stated his belief in the 
team player as a positive influ- 
ence in the business world. As 
part of an esteemed football pro- 
gram, an employer may look at 
an athlete and consider the "team 
concept" mentality of the person, 
as Panos stated. He reasserted 
this claim, saying that an athlete 
is already accustomed to "early 
rising for practice" and the harness 
of "a full work week." These 
comments were also backed up 
by fellow linebacker, Steven 
Boyd, who spoke of "discipline, 
and being effective in getting a 

CONTINUED ON PAGE 182 



"A person becomes challenged to 
balance both an academic and an 
athletic commitment..." 

Mike Panos 





v~ 










178 Football 




Cvt 




1 



32 51 



— 




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Football 179 



RESULTS 


BC OPP 




7 23 


Miami 


21 22 


Northwestern 


66 14 


Temple 


33 29 


Syracuse 


31 21 


Rutgers 


41 14 


Army 


42 14 


Tulane 


48 34 


Virginia Tech 


33 


Pittsburgh 


41 39 


Notre Dame 


14 17 


West Virginia 


8-3-0 OVERALL RECORD 



>•*'* 





I HO Football 




A Roller Coaster 

of Hopes and 

Dreams 



From painful heartaches 
to thrilling hysteria, the 1993 
football season provided a 
rollercoaster ride that no player, 
coach, or fan ever will forget. 
This was a team picked by most 
to finish 8-3 and third in the Big 
East. The Eagles followed suit, 
but in a way no one could have 
predicted. 

The ride all began as the 
always powerful Miami 
Hurricanes stormed into town and 
blew the Eagles away 23-7. The 
disappointment of this loss, 
however, seemed minimal, as two 
weeks later the always lacking 
Northwestern Wildcats pulled a 
22-2 1 upset which left the Eagles 
out of the rankings and with one 
foot in their grave. Questions of 
quarterback Glenn Foley' s ability 
and coach Tom Coughlin's 
rejection of the New York Giants 
coaching position began to 
emerge. 

But wait! Glenn Foley 
and his teammates picked 
themselves up. After routing 
Temple 66-14, they stormed into 
the Carrier Dome and captured a 
huge 33-29 victiory against Big 
East rival Syracuse. They 
continued their streak by 
trouncing Army 41-14 and 
likewise Tulane 42-14. The 



rollercoaster kept rising as the 
Eagles manhandled a ranked 
Virginia Tech team 48-34, then 
crushed Pittsburgh 33-0. They 
were on their way to a bowl game. 

This ride was not ready to 
stop, not even against the # 1 Notre 
Dame Fighting Irish. The Eagles 
along with many loyal fans flew 
into South Bend and soared out 
with a 41-39 victory in what has 
been called the "Game of the 
Century." After losing a 21 point 
lead, the Eagles came back with a 
minute left to watch David 
Gordon from 41 yards kick 
Boston College into instant fame 
and instant insanity. 

The Eagles had another 
chance to beat an undefeated team 
when West Virginia came to the 
Heights. Unfortunately, this one 
slipped out of their hands as five 
turnovers enabled an otherwise 
dominated West Virginia team to 
squeak out a 17-14 win. This 
travesty knocked the Eagles out 
of Sugar Bowl hopes and into the 
seat of Carquest and its bowl. 
Nonetheless, this season was truly 
a rollercoaster ride that no one 
wanted to get off. The Eagles 
created undescribable thrills that 
will be cherished forever. 
Tim Burke 



Football 181 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 178 

job done," when discussing the 
balance of academic and athletic 
spheres. 

Both Boyd and Panos, 
however, have a special interest 
in the combination of football 
and scholastics. Steven Boyd has 
been arduously pursuing a degree 
in Human Development within 
the School of Education. He has 
learned much from both his pro- 
fessors and his coaches. Boyd 
learned much, for example from 
his coaches by watching how they 
deal with team personalities and 
the finesse they used to alleviate 
problem situations. These obser- 
vations are important skills 
needed to carry out his future 
goal, a guidance counselor for 



children. Panos, a red shirted 
freshman, who graduated with a 
degree in English this past May, 
is continuing his education while 
opting to play his fifth year. Mike 
felt that the experience of work- 
ing with children at lower income 
school district in Brighton has 
been one of the most rewarding. 
He stressed the need for more 
funding for public education in 
order to improve society as a 
whole. Mike Panos will strive to 
find his place among the rare 
teaching positions. Continuing in 
the field of education came from 
the importance for high quality 
education, along with the greater 
disciplines of football. 

Kellianne Mortimer 



"...interacting with different 
people, and learning to deal 
with personality types ..." 

Steven Boyd 



182 Football 





MMMNflMi 




Football 183 



TRE DAME Q:QQ BOSTON COL 



ME OUTS LEFT 



TIME OUTS LEFT 

IALL ON 






When Irish Eyes 
Were Crying 



The fans who witnessed 
Notre Dame' s 54-7 rout of Boston 
College a year before did not 
plan to see it happen again. Notre 
Dame, who was coming off a 
huge win against Florida State, 
had gained the #1 ranking in the 
nation. Still, with this team 
running off a string of seven 
straight victories, people knew 
this was a different Boston 
College team than a year before. 

As the game commenced, 
B.C. broke out to a 10-0 lead and 
the B.C. fans went wild. When 
the scoreboard showed 38-17 
Boston College with only eleven 
minutes left, the Notre Dame 
crowd was in shock. This year 
the B.C. faithful were glad they 
had made the trip. The passing 
attack of senior Glenn Foley and 
the hard nosed running of senior 
Darnell Campbell had combined 
to produce the high offensive 
output. 

The B.C. defense played 
above expectations, and shut 
down Notre Dame's high 
powered offense. From the very 
beginning when Stephen Boyd 
blocked a Notre Dame field goal, 
to the outstanding play of 
sophomore Mike Mamula, the 
Boston College defense 
stonewalled the ND offense. 



Suddenly, the defense 
broke down. When the scoreboard 
read 39-38 Notre Dame with 1 :09 
left in the game the Boston College 
fans dropped to their seats. In the 
last eleven minutes Notre Dame 
had scored 22 points in an 
unbelievable comeback. It seemed 
that Notre Dame really did have 
the luck of the Irish, and that 
Touchdown Jesus was watching 
over them. 

With 1:09 left, Glenn 
Foley masterfully led the Eagles 
down to the Notre Dame 24 where 
he connected with Ivan Boyd in 
the middle of the field. With 0:05 
showing on the clock, the game 
was placed into the hands of 
placekicker David Gordon who 
previously missed the game 
winning field goal against 
Northwestern. 

The 41 yard field goal 
attempt by Gordon started right, 
and then suddenly curved back 
inside to make it through the 
goalposts. As the Boston College 
fans raged onto the field. They 
knew they had witnessed the 
"Game of the Century." When 
the scoreboard read 41-39, the 
luck of the Irish had shifted 
towards the true Irish, Boston 
College. 

Chris Deeley 



Football 185 



Amy Luiz 



Eagles Shine in South 

Florida's Carquest 

Bowl 



The sun was shining on 
New Year's Day as the Boston 
College Football Team soundly 
defeated the Virginia Cavaliers 
in the Carquest Bowl. The Eagles 
finished off their season with a 9- 
3 record while climbing into 1 3th 
rank in the Associated Press Poll. 
The Eagles mounted an impres- 
sive offensive attack gaining 557 
total yards. Quarterback Glenn 
Foley led the team yet again with 
another strong outing. He picked 
the Cavaliers defense apart while 
completing 25 of 36 passes for 
39 1 yards and three touchdowns. 
His performance earned him the 
bowl's most valuable player to 
add to his long list of accolades. 

Making Foley's job a bit 
easier this season were the de- 
pendable receivers who caught 
key passes again and again dur- 
ing clutch situations. Junior split 
end, Clarence Cannon ran circles 
around the Cavalier's defense as 
he caught 3 passes for 109 yards 
while scoring three touchdowns. 
The ever consistent tight end, 
Pete Mitchell grabbed seven 
passes for 82 yards. Senior 
wideout, Keith Miller finished 
his career on a fine note after 
catching a 46 yard pass for a 
touchdown. Running backs 
Darnell Campbell and Dave 
Green led the rushing game with 
a combined 173 yards. 



On the defensive side of 
the ball, the Eagles were led by 
Junior inside linebacker Steven 
Boyd who had 11 tackles. Help- 
ing to stop any Cavalier threat 
was the talented Sophomore 
strong safety, Terrence Wiggins, 
who contributed 8 tackles. Also 
in on the attack were defensive 
backs Eric Shorter and Joe 
Kamara, while defensive lineman 
Chris Sullivan, Senior inside 
linebacker Brian Howlett and 
Sophomore outside linebacker 
Mike Mamula all turned in fine 
performances. 

Looking back on the fine 
season it is fitting to recognize 
the leadership set forth by the 
seniors on the team. Those names 
include Glenn Foley, center Tom 
Nalen, fullback Darnell 
Campbell, the fire and ice duo of 
receivers Keith Miller and Ivan 
Boyd, guard Marc Borelli, inside 
line backers Mike Panos and 
Brian Howlett, outside linebacker 
Dan Kerr and defensive tackle 
Ted Page. After the victory, Coach 
Coughlin summed it up by saying, 
"It was a really great way to end 
our year." Kudos go out to the 
entire Boston College Football 
Team for all of the hard work and 
dedication throughout the entire 
football season leading to a most 
deserving victory in the Carquest 
Bowl. 

Paula Bresnahan 




Amy Lutz 






186 l-oothal 




( ini.iiiir I conurd 




Football 187 



RESULTS 


FINISH 


EVENT 




Women 


5/9 


Dartmouth Invitational 


3/13 


Yale Invitational 


2/8 


New Jersey Invitational 


3/7 


Mt. Holyoke Invitational 


7/11 


ECAC Championships 




Men 


3/9 


UConn Invitational 


9/31 


Yale Invitational 


5/7 


Big East Championships 


5/10 


Toski Invitational 


Tie- 1/21 


ECAC Qualifier 


10/20 


ECAC Championships 


19/21 


Old Dominion Invitational • 






188 (lolf 








Consistency 
Breeds 

Encouraging 
Results 



Under the joint coaching 
prowess of men's coach Peter 
Bigham, and women' s coach Kurt 
Sokolowski, the golf team has 
swung their way through another 
successful season. Both the men' s 
and women's team members 
showed encouraging results 
during the 1993 fall season. 
Highlighting the men's season 
was the UConn Invitational kick 
off tournament where they placed 
3rd out of 9 teams. An additional 
season thrill included the October 
7 ECAC Qualifier in Waterville, 
ME where the team impressively 
tied for 1 st out of 21 teams. Both 
hard work and determination have 
contributed to the team's consis- 
tent success. 

The 6 member women's 
team, overall, had an equally im- 
pressive season. According to 
junior team member Kathy Bur- 
gess the season was a "a great 
success, everyone played ex- 
tremely well." Burgess helped 
start the women ' s season off with 
a bang when she individually 
placed 2nd at the Yale Invita- 



tional. At the October 2-3 New 
Haven, CT event at Yale, the team, 
as a whole, finished 3rd out of 1 3 
teams. Team captain, senior 
Maura McLauglin also received 
special recognition at the October 
15-16 Mt. Holyoke Invitational, 
where she individually placed 3rd 
overall. Burgess also cited senior 
Donna Moore as a "great edition 
to the team." Moore, who previ- 
ously played Softball, has con- 
sistently been ranked #3 for the 
team during the course of the 
season. 

The women played at a 
variety of tournaments and 
Invitationals along the east coast 
including: the September 25-26 
Dartmouth Invitational, the Oc- 
tober 8-9 New Jersey Invitational, 
and the October 22-24 ECAC 
Championships at James Madison 
University in Harrisonburg, VA. 
Both teams have been working 
hard to continue to carry their 
success into the spring golf sea- 
son. 

Kellianne Mortimer 



"A great success, everyone played 

extremely Well." Kathy Burgess 



Golf 189 



Matthew West 



Competitiveness and 

D e termination 

Capture Big East 



Expectations, confidence, 
and competitiveness were all 
great as this year' s women' s field 
hockey team walked onto the 
playing field. They were deter- 
mined to qualify for the Big East 
Tournament, for this was the first 
year that its victor would receive 
an automatic birth in the NCAA 
Tournament. Coach Sherren 
Granese deeply believed that "If 
[they] played well as a team, 
[they] would have a good shot." 
Indeed, it was their excellent 
teamwork that sparked them to a 
fourth place finish and a bid to 
the Big East Tournament. 

The season unfortunately 
commenced with four close losses 
to nationally ranked teams. Al- 
though the team badly wanted a 
win and fought to no avail, the 
close losses showed that they 
could compete with anyone. With 
this in mind the team did not 
panic, but wisely looked to their 
strength of team oriented play to 
carry them. Subsequently, as the 
season progressed, they came 
together as a team to increase 
their level of play. 

Even though the team was 



not reliant on one or two super- 
stars, nonetheless, there was those 
who could not go unnoticed. 
Notably, Senior Christine Curley, 
with her explosive speed and 
sharp skills, was not only a potent 
force on the field, but also was 
looked upon with great respect 
by her peers. However, with only 
one other senior, Dara Williams, 
the team looked to the Juniors to 
bring it all together. With the 
outstanding play of captains Jen 
Baker and Paula Boukovalas, 
along with the Big East scoring 
champ Julie Obear, the Juniors 
gave the team the ingredients 
necessary, as Paula Boukovalas 
said, "to compete all year long". 
The spirit of competition 
clearly was evident in this team, 
even up to the very last ticks of 
the clock in their Tournament loss 
to Big East champ Syracuse. The 
season undeniably was a success 
for many reasons: they accom- 
plished their initial goal, they 
competed relentlessly, and they 
came together as teammates. 
Coach Granese said she can "only 
be excited about the future of this 
young team." 

Tim Burke 



"...To compete all year long." 

Paula Boukovalas 



190 Field Hockey 





RESULTS 


BC OPP 




1 2 


Northeastern 


2 3 


Northwestern 


6 


U Mass 


1 


Michigan 


3 1 


Springfield 


3 


Villanova 


7 


Georgetown 


1 2 


Boston University 


1 3 


Providence 


2 4 


Syracuse 


3 4 


Vermont 


2 


Rhode Island 


2 1 


Brown University 


2 


Connecticut 


2 1 


Harvard 


1 6 


James Madison 


3 1 


Duke 





New Hampshire 


2 


Cornell 


1 


Holy Cross 


3 


Syracuse 


9-11-1 


OVERALL RECORD 





Photo Courtesy of Boston College Sports Infon 

Front Row: Sarah Egnaczyk, Paula Boukavalas, Christine Curley, Jennifer Baker, 

Elizabeth Hays. 

Middle Row: Collette Hertel, Dara Williams, Jaime Moen, Nicole Statuta, 

Elizabeth Walker, Jessica Sinco, Robin Rozycki. 

Back Row: Head Coach Sherren Granese, Kristen Fiederlein, Rebecca Zannini, 

Meaghan Reilly, Rachel Mott, Alexi Siglin, Erin McLaughlin, Juli Obear, Michelle 

Labonge, Kris Kelleher, Assistant Coach Alison Corradi, Assistant Coach Brenda 

Canning. 



Field Hockey 191 



Rob Schlcnkcr 





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► v BOSTI 


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Pholo Courtesy of Boslon College Wrcslliny 



Front Row: Seth Bice, Mike Odiotti, Co-captain Jim Gallagher, Alex 

Tsianatelis, Brendan Kenney, Gary MacDonald, Eric George, Jeff Gibbons. 

Middle Row: Mike Dullea, Matt Dullea, Buddy Berry, Mike Camarra, Sarkis 

Renjilian-Burgy, Luke Renjilian-Burgy, Pat Beefier, Rick Thorne. 

Back Row: Emerson Wickwirc, Mike Colleran, Co-captain Mike Peroni, Peter 

Foley, Erick Knudsen, Ronald Minotello, James Chidiac. 

Not Pictured: Mike Eaton, Gene Feyl, John Flavin, Peter Folan, Matt McCabe, 

Joe Mitchell, Manager Sabrin a lluertas, Mead Coach Roil Butiry. 



192 Wrestling 




Challenges Met 

By Depth of 

Talent 



Although the men's 
wrestling team was plagued by 
injuries, they were still able to 
withstand a tough schedule and 
make a respectable showing for 
the season. Led by Coach Rod 
Buttry and junior co-captains Jim 
Gallagher and Mike Peroni, the 
young team was able to stand up 
to the challenge to see some very 
hard-fought victories. 

In his eighth season at 
B.C., Coach Buttry was able to 
use the depth in the weight classes 
to overcome the injury obstacle. 
Even though five of the starters, 
Mike Peroni, James Chidiac, Seth 
Blee, Mike Eaton, and senior Joe 
Mitchell, were hurt, the team saw 
a great deal of help from the 
freshmen as well as Jim Gallagher 
and senior John Flavin. Both Jim 
and John had promising seasons 
and saw the possibility of going 



to the New England Champion- 
ships. 

The team came close to 
beating some Division I ranked 
teams such as Seton Hall, where 
B.C. only lost by 15 points. Beat- 
ing WPI by a score of 27-9 was a 
big highlight because B.C. had 
lost to them the previous year. 

Co-captain Jim Gallagher 
said, "It has been the best season 
that we have seen in a few years. 
Coach Buttry is dedicated to the 
team, and overall, our work ethic 
kept us going and allowed us to 
work well together." Co-captain 
Mike Peroni said, "Although the 
competition was harder and we 
saw some disappointing losses, 
we won the matches that we 
should have won, and we stood 
up to the challenge." 

Deborah McNamara 



"It has been the best season that we have seen 
in a few years. Coach Buttry is dedicated to the 
team, and overall, our work ethic kept us going 
and allowed us to work well together." 

Jim Gallagher 



Wrestling 193 



All Photos by Amy Lutz 



Matthew West 



Strong Season 

Builds Confidence 

and Potential 



A trip to Ireland sparked 
the early opening of the men's 
soccer season. "We played the 
top college team in Ireland. It 
was a great game. We won 1-0," 
said Coach Ed Kelly. 

The Conference season 
began with a tough loss to Saint 
John's, but quickly turned around 
with three straight wins over 
Providence, Syracuse and Seton 
Hall. The streak came to a halt in 
the last weeks with a tough defeat 
to Georgetown, and a final defeat 
by Villanova. The team still ended 
with an impressive 13-5-1 record 
and a temporary spot in the top 
20. 

The team was back in top 
playing shape for the Big East 
Tournament. The men rolled 
through the first rounds easily, 
and overwhelmed Georgetown 
with a final score of 4-0 in the 



semi-finals. The final round was 
a tough fight against fifth-ranked 
St. Johns, with the battle ending 
in an overtime loss. Junior Dan 
McDonald said, "The most 
memorable games of the season 
were in the Big East Tournament 
where we played the best of the 
whole season." 

The team barely missed 
the N.C.A.A. Tournament , and 
finished the season with a 6-3-0 
record, a major improvement over 
their 3-5-0 record last year. 
McDonald said, "The team as a 
whole is young with only three 
seniors graduating and has enor- 
mous potential for improvement 
over the next few years." Coach 
Kelly ended by saying, "This is 
the best team I've had since I 
came here [six years ago] and 
there's more to come, I hope." 
Kate Emery 



'The most memorable games of 
the season were in the Big East 
Tournament where we played the 
best of the whole season." 

Dan McDonald 



194 Men's Soccer 




Matthew West 



^ 




RESULTS 


BC OPP 




5 


Rhode Island 


4 2 


Stetson 





Boston University 


1 3 


St. John's 


2 1 


Providence 


6 2 


Syracuse 


2 1 


Seton Hall 


2 1 


Hartford 


2 1 


Pittsburgh 


2 


Dartmouth 


3 2 


Northeastern 


2 


Harverd 


1 2 


Georgetown 


3 1 


Connecticut 


1 2 


Villanova 


3 1 


Holy Cross 


4 


Georgetown 


2 


St. John's 


12-5-1 


OVERALL RECORD 



Matthew West 






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Photo Courtesy of Boston College Sports In 



Front Row: Paulo Jorge Neves, Steve Johnson, Head Coach Ed Kelly, Carlos 

Casas. Paul Fahey. 

Second Row: Marius Lund, Will Crowley, Paul Keegan, Rob Schweizer, Daryl 

Gioffre, Assistant Coach Scott Lucas, Athletic Trainer Sheila Griffin. 

Back Row: Marc Bala, Paul Johnson, Dan Atanasov, Brian Siracusa, Dan 

McDonald, Sean Yokota, Chris Bauer. 

Not Pictured: Keith O'Halloran, Assistant Coach Brian Ainscough. 



Men's Soccer 195 




Front Row: Doug DulTin, Jim Mello, Brooke Henry, Jessica Tamburrino, Michelle Fleming, Gary Bosse, Andre DeCasteja. 

Second Row: Head Coach Sydney Fadner, Co-Captain Susan Master, Hien Nguyen, Joyce Liu, Michelle Yap, Jen Wall, 

Frin Langley, Lucy Griesbach, David Shapiro. 

Back Row: Sara Solomon, John Pcltonen, Mike Waring, John Wood, Bob Herbsl/.uber, Dan Grillo, Jack Huntress, Josh 

Lewis, Brendan Lewis. 

Not Pictured: Co-Captain Chris Chute, Keun Ok, Peter Mirahclla. 



I')C) Fencing 




On the Edge and 
a Cut Above 



Paul Hezc 




The early 1940's saw the 
last time a varsity fencing team 
bouted on the Heights. Meets, 
held in Gasson 100, gathered 
small, excited audiences to sup- 
port BC fencers. By 1945, team 
members had graduated without 
heirs. A year later, the team 
disappeared. Not until 1971 did 
the sport return to Boston College, 
but only with club recognition. 
Interest diminished in 1 979, but a 
resurgence in 1989 led to its 
recognition in the Northeast 
Fencing Conference and NCAA 
status today. 

In 1 990, the newly formed 
Boston College Men's Fencing 
team competed at the New En- 
gland Championships. They 
fenced and finished, but in last 
place. Subsequent years, how- 
ever, have yielded growing suc- 
cess for this team. The men's 
team finished fifth at the 1991 
New England Competition, and 
the women's team, in their first 
team competition, finished sixth. 

Welcome to the present. 
The 1993-94 season began with 
their first meet of the year, known 
as "The Big One," which gave a 
glimpse of the success to come. 
Christopher Chute, '94, was 
narrowly defeated in the men's 
sabre competition to take an ad- 
mirable second place. Coach 
Sydney Fadner and team co-cap- 



tains Christopher Chute, '94, and 
Susan Master, '94, were confi- 
dent for a terrific season. The 
team, with the other officers, 
treasurer Joyce Liu, '94 and sec- 
retary John Peltonen, '96, were 
also ready to face any challenge. 
Seniors Gary Bosse and Jim Mello 
of men's foil, Chris Chute of 
men' s sabre, and Susan Master of 
women ' s foil all end their college 
fencing careers with an edge of 
victory. 

Each member possessed 
the agility of an gymnast, the 
speed of a sprinter, and the con- 
centration of a tournament chess 
player. A senior fencer spirited 
the comment, "when I came to 
B.C., fencing was a nonentity, 
but after I leave here, we will 
have one of the best programs in 
New England." Team members 
share a spirit only overpowered 
by their quick footwork and 
rapidfire attacks. Every bout is a 
war in itself, fought with the 
vigor of determined opponents. 
Outstanding displays in each of 
three types of weapons, foil, sa- 
bre, and epee, can be seen during 
any practice, but the grueling 
desire is witnessed only during a 
bout. Clearly, the life of Boston 
College Fencing has just begun a 
long and enduring trek to display 
its truly competitive edge. 

David S. Shapiro 



Fencing 197 



Mind and Body 

Connect to Secure 

4 in a Row 



Maura Nicholson 



Positive attitude and 
unrelenting commitment to play 
hard led the 1 993 Boston College 
women's soccer team to another 
winning season. The team was 
led by senior captains Tricia 
Cook, the goalkeeper, and Katie 
Delay, along with junior captain 
Mary Bern. 

Going into the season 
Coach Terez Bonorden did not 
see her young team as being a 
problem. "Everything was up in 
the air and anything could 
happen." Her strong freshman 
recruiting class and her returning 
players proved that a young team 
could still be very competitive. 
At the end of the season, freshman 
and sophomores led the team in 
both scoring and assists. 

The young team lost 
leadership in the absense of 
captain Mary Bern for a span of 
twelve games. The players had a 
difficult time putting the ball in 
the net, and their confidence was 
down. 

With a 4-1 victory over 
conference rival St. John' s, a new 
born confidence and ability to 
score propelled the Eagles to four 
straight wins. The physical style 



of play in the St. John's game 
injected energy and heart into all 
of the players as they continued 
to put forth a total team effort. 

After this dramatic turn 
around, the team pulled off an 
exciting victory in the Cornell 
Classic by posting impressive 
victories against both Colgate and 
Cornell. With less financial 
support and scholarships than 
most Division I soccer schools, 
the tournament victory 
represented the heart and 
determination of this year's 
women's soccer team. Coach 
Bonorden' s philosophy was "that 
you have to be strong 
physiologically to be successful 
in anything you do." 

Even though the team lost 
to Providence in the inaugural 
Big East Women's Soccer 
Tournament, the players follow 
their coach' s positive philosophy 
and continue to produce 
successful, winning seasons. 
Through their intense 
determination, hard work, and 
courage, the youthful 1993 
Boston College Women' s Soccer 
Team ended with success. 
Chris Deeley 



"...You have to be strong 
physiologically to be successful in 
anything you do." 

Head Coach Terez. Bonorden 

198 Women's Soccer 





RESULTS 


BC OPP 




1 2 


Massachusetts 


1 3 


Hartford 


5 1 


Holy Cross 


3 


Stony Brook 


3 1 


Villanova 


1 


Connecticut 


3 1 


New Hampshire 


1 3 


Harvard 


2 


Vermont 


4 1 


Rhode Island 


1 


Rutgers 


3 


Dartmouth 


4 1 


St. John's 


3 1 


Maine 


2 1 


Colgate 


2 


Cornell 


1 


Brown 


1 


Providence 


1 2 


Providence 


2 1 


Brown 


1 5 


James Madison 


12-9 


OVERALL RECORD 



mmmiumammi^tmii^KtKK^I^mmmmaiMlimmmmmil^^^ 



Front Row: Katie McMahon, Claire Feeney, Cara Griffin, Kendra Molina, Tricia Cook, Karen DeVoe, Kara Nance, Erin Horney, 
Jennifer Kelley, Melissa Wolf. 

Back Row: Head Coach Terez Bonorden, April Parker, Jessica David, Michelle Mollard, Kate Delay, Mary Byrne, Kristina 
Szczepanski, Allison David, Deidra Byrnes, Lisa Taylor, Kim Halleran, Assistant Coach Rob Blanck. 




Photo Courtesy of Boston College Sports Information I 



Women's Soccer 199 




200 Men's Track 



IVli-i Munis 



t 



t 








Young and 

Experienced Fight 

the Bitter Winter 

Together 



For the Men's Track 
Team, the bone chilling tem- 
peratures reminded these brave 
athletes that the New England 
winters are anything but merciful. 
Preparing for the 1994 season, 
the track team battled the ele- 
ments with anticipation for up- 
coming races. Among the pack 
of dedicated athletes were many 
old and new faces. Working seven 
days a week under the coaching 
of Randy Thomas, the veteran 
athletes brought their experience 
and determination to the track to 
excite and motivate the many 
newcomers. 

Co-captains Senior Sean 
McEllin and Junior Chris 
Georgules faced the season as 
defending New England Cham- 
pions. In the distance events, the 
team relied on the strength of 
Seniors Sean McEllin and Ronan 



O'Flaherty, and Underclassmen 
John Wassenaar, Tom Hunt, and 
World Cross Country Qualifier 
Chris Georgules. Sophomore 
Michael Burke led the men in 
sprints. Comprising a significant 
portion of the team were several 
key freshmen competors. Joining 
the Eagle squad were distance 
runner Darren Keenan, who rep- 
resented Ireland in the 1 993 World 
Cross Country Championships. 
Also demonstrating great poten- 
tial were freshmen All American 
twins Mark and Sean 
McGehearty, who qualified for 
the NCAA's in the 35 lb. weight. 
With the experience of the up- 
perclassmen and the talent of the 
the many new athletes, the men's 
track and field team had a fruitful 
year. 

Melissa Supler 




Men's Track 201 



Optimism Spreads 
With New 
Dedication 



Discipline, dedication, 
and desire were the three prin- 
ciples that led the rookie men's 
cross country team to a success- 
ful season. "Since nine runners 
graduated, I was forced to ask 
more from the underclassmen," 
said Head Coach Randy Thomas. 
The young team still managed to 
perform even better than antici- 
pated. 

After finishing third 
against several impressive teams, 
the Murry Keating Invitational in 
Maine proved to be an outstand- 
ing accomplishment for the 
squad. By putting their heads 
together in the match, the team 
gave a scare to the top two teams 
in the nation: Iowa and Arizona. 



Freshman Darren Keenan and 
Sophomore Brendan Ring, two 
of the top runners on the team, 
performed exceptionally well. 
Ring attributed his exceptional 
improvement to the new attitude 
he had. "I was excited for the 
season. I worked hard over the 
summer in order to perform well." 
Cross country runners, 
who participate in cross country, 
indoor track, and outdoor track, 
are the only three sport athletes 
on campus. They train, travel, 
and compete throughout the en- 
tire year, while also developing 
close friendships during the long 
hours of hard work. With this 
dedication, optimism is high for 
future seasons. 

Elizabeth Mignone 




"I was excited for the season. I 
worked hard over the summer in 
order to perform well." 

Brendan Ring 



► -» 





202 Men's Cross Country 




RESULTS 


FINISH 


RACE 


1/2 


Vermont 


2/2 


Dartmouth Invitational 


8/13 


BC Invitational 


3/9 


Murry Keating 




Invitational 


7/10 


Big East Championships 


26/30 


ICAAA Championships 



Mi 



H 



*.T-. 



\ 



m 



. 






Men's Cross Country 203 




204 Women's Track 



Sicphi 'i i Anlofilh 




*•» 






Strong Leadership 

Motivates Team 

Through the 

Harshest of Storms 




Faced with a bitter win- 
ter, the Women's Track Team 
had to overcome the elements in 
their training schedule. Many of 
these athletes competed all year 
long and trained seven days a 
week. Coach Randy Thomas 
provided the motivation neces- 
sary to keep the diverse group of 
upper and underclassen working 
hard through the cold winter. 

The Women's Track 
Team was comprised of a mix of 
upperclassmen and freshmen. In 
the distance events, the women 
had a strong showing. Senior 
Captain Chrissy Dittami and 
fellow Senior Diane Connolly, 
along with Juniors Melissa 
Supler, Kerry Lyman, and Laura 
Quendenfeld brought a wealth of 
experience and numerous "Big 
East," "All-New England," and 
"All East" running honors. 
Adding a heavy dose of fresh 



talent and passion, freshmen dis- 
tance standouts Amy Lyman, 
Caroline Pimlett, and Anne 
Nicholson came off of successful 
cross-country seasons, and com- 
peted in their first collegiate track 
year. In the sprinting events, Se- 
nior Captain Tiffany Young held 
various Boston College records 
and many collegiate champion- 
ships. In the area of field events, 
Senior Captain Paige MacTavish 
attempted to shatter her current 
records in the 20 lb. weight and 
hammer, in another trip to the 
U.S. Track Championships. Long 
jumpers Kim Facey and Andrea 
Melton showed their talent. Dis- 
playing a mass of talent in all 
areas of track and field, the 
women's team was a top con- 
tender in all meets as they worked 
towards winning the New En- 
gland Championships. 

Melissa Supler 



Women's Track 205 



New Talent Bears 
Fresh Support 



Despite the fact that the 
women's cross country team in- 
cluded 1 3 freshmen this year, the 
team did exceptionally well. 
Though the lack of experience 
showed in the early matches, the 
team progressed as the season 
continued, showing some im- 
provement at every meet. 

The highlight of the sea- 
son came during the team's home 
meet, the BC Invitiational, run at 
Franklin Park. The team finished 
in fourth place, behind the nation's 
top-ranked team, Villanova, and 
top-ten ranked Providence Col- 
lege. Additionally, freshman 
Anne Nicholson had a strong 
showing at the meet, leading the 
BC team. 

Injuries plagued the lone 



seniors on the team, captains 
Christine Dittami and Diane 
Connolly. However, they truly 
believe that this team had a great 
year because of how they came 
together during the season. In 
such an individualized sport, the 
team members found the strength 
and ability to make up for any 
losses. 

Christine Dittami added 
that this was "the closest team in 
terms of talent. The top seven 
members had really close times, 
and there was no runner who 
would win every race. There 
would be a new person who would 
step up each race. This team 
definitely exceeded the expecta- 
tions of our coach, Randy Tho- 
mas." 

Herman Yip 



"...the closest team in terms of tal- 
ent. This team definitely exceeded 
the expectations of our coach, 
Randy Thomas. 



M 



Christine Dittami 



206 Women's Cross Country 





RESULTS 


FINISH 


RACE 


1/3 


Vermont, New Hampshire 


3/4 


Dartmouth Invitational 


4/12 


BC Invitational 


4/10 


Murray Keating 




Invitational 


4/10 


Big East Championships 





Wt- IT 



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t! 



yi smu«- \ v 




Women's Cross Country 207 




Front Row: Stephanie Plant/., Norah Kane, Patriek Quinn, Greg Howells, Jill Cupoli, Pete Christensen, Craig Tiballi, Pat 

McGovem, Head Coach Bill 'Foot'. 

Hack Row: Assistant Women's Coach Brad Vcrmeulen, Jessica I -lull, Brooke Pearson, Kevin Williams, Jim Ferris, Jim 

Carolan, Mark Mezzanotte, Brendon Donnellan, Todd (Justin, Josh Person, Assistant Men's Coach Malt Quinn. 

Not Pictured: Manager John Stratton, Linda MacKinnon. 



\n Photos bj Stcphoii J Aiih'ink 



20X Skill).- 



I 





Victory on the 
Slopes 



The men's and women's 
ski team excelled as they fin- 
ished close to the top of many of 
their races. The team was guided 
by Head Coach Bill Toof and 
Assistant Coaches Matt Quinn 
and Brad Vermeulen. The men's 
team which consisted of one se- 
nior, James Carolan, three juniors, 
six sophomores, and two fresh- 
men, used its youth to its advan- 
tage to see some great triumphs 
come its way. The women, like- 
wise, were backed by a young 
team of one junior, Jill Cupoli, 
and five sophomores. 

At the Berkshire East 
race, the men finished second in 
both the slalom and the giant 
slalom. The women finished first 
in the slalom and second in the 
giant slalom. 

At Ascutney Mountain, 
both the men and the women 
skiied to even higher accolades 
as they finished first in the slalom 



and second in the giant slalom. 

As they skiied in 
Waterville Valley in the Boston 
College/Plymouth State Winter 
Carnival, B.C. andPlymouthState 
battled for the top two places. 
The men finished second in the 
slalom while Jim Ferris placed 
fourth and Greg Howells placed 
fifth. The women also saw a 
second place finish as Jill Cupoli 
and Brooke Pearson took first 
and second place. 

The men finished second 
to Plymouth State in the giant 
slalom, however Jim Ferris placed 
second individually and Pete 
Christiansen placed fourth. The 
women came out on top in the 
giant slalom while Jessica Hult 
and Pearson placed third and 
fourth respectively. 

The ski team saw a suc- 
cessful season as they raced down 
the mountain to victory. 



Skiing 209 



Fresh and Veteran 

Coaching Navigates To 

National Recognition 




The wisdom and experi- 
ence of five year coach Norman 
Reid, combined with the talents 
of youth, established the Sailing 
Team in the A division. The sail- 
ing team, composed both of men 
and women, astounded fans by 
achieving a fifth place finish in 
the McMillian Cup Regatta, the 
oldest sailing event in college 
competition. According to Coach 
Reid, "This is probably the most 
positive season in five years. We 
have finally made the last jump 
into the A division, we should be 
nationally ranked." 

Another highlight of the 
season that retains particular im- 
portance for the upperclassmen 
was the Schell Regatta on the 
Charles River. This allowed the 
team to qualify for the Atlantic 
Coast Finals. According to se- 
nior Tim Dawson, "The Schell 
was the most exciting race of the 
year." It was the first time since 
the senior's freshman year that 
the team had qualified for this 



event. During the New England 
Championships at M.I.T., the 
team won the first race of the day 
and finished with a second place 
overall. The freshman sailing 
crew followed the tradition set by 
the performance of the upper- 
classmen with a third place finish 
at the New England Champion- 
ships in Dartmouth. This quali- 
fied them for the Altantic Coast 
finals as well. 

Senior Katy Wadlow at- 
tributed the strong season to the 
coaching staff. "We have new 
assistant coaches who have sailed 
at top schools. We just qualified 
for the Atlantic Coast and the 
team shows definite improve- 
ment." 

Although the team is los- 
ing several key sailors this year, 
the future of the team looks 
promising with the ten current 
freshmen. According to Coach 
Reid, "I see the team improving 
every year. We are getting a bet- 
ter quality sailor." 

Maryann Regan 



"We just qualified for the Atlan- 
tic Coast and the team shows 
definite improvement." 

Katy Wadlow 



'$ 



210 Sailing 





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4 



"IllHildllJ | 




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mil 


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iiiii 





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■i 














Front Row: Ann Lassotovitch, Katy Wadlow, Dave Mitchell, Paul Hamilton. 

Second Row: Bill Adams, Jeanne Doherty, Ali Malloy, Jenny Rovegno, Christine 

Idzelis. 

Third Row: Tim Dawson, Erin Razzetti, Noah Doolittle, John Buckley. 

Fourth Row: Ivy Johnson, Robin Ranero, Adam Van Ness, Charles Flynn, Marissa 

Donovan. 

Fifth Row: Patrick Brogan, Nicolas Mounier, Ted Grayson, John Boyt. 

Sixth Row: Colleen Miller, Suzie Milbauer, Barney Walker, Tobin Tornehl. 

Back Row: Head Coach Norm Reid. 

Not Pictured: Dave Rentz, Amy Scriple, Carr Moody. 



Sailing 211 




Front Row: Claudine Pietrucha, Traccy Labossicrc, Sue Compson, Co-Captain Lisa Tulimieri, Co-Captain Amy Tiernan, 

Kale Anlos, Meaghan O'Neill, Kristin Gray. 

Second Row: Assistant Coach Paul Melvin, Kim Murray, Erin Carroll, Heidi Anderson, Kathleen Garvin, Megan Danaher, 

Beckie Duvall, Erin Tullock, Head Coach Tom O'Malley. 

Back Row: Manager Tammy Meade, Karen Emma, Courtney Eckardt, Tobin Dominick, Laura Traynham, Liz Dawson, 

Katie Godbout, Trainer Rosanna Martino. 






212 Women's Hockey 




Having Fun While 
Making Strides 



"Hockey with a Smile" 
was the motto which the women' s 
ice hockey team kept close to its 
heart. In changing from a club 
sport to a varsity Division I sport, 
the transition caused only a few 
adjustments, including changes 
in the schedule of the teams they 
were to play. Mostly because of 
Head Coach Tom O'Malley's 
efforts in the past years to run the 
team as a varsity sport, the team 
had little trouble modifying their 
work habits. 

Senior co-captain Lisa 
Tulimieri said, "Coach O'Malley, 
for the past ten years, has put his 
heart and soul into the team and 
worked really hard getting ready 
for every game." Lisa expressed 
that Assistant Coach Paul Melvin, 
who worked mainly with the 
defense and the goalie, was not 
only an excellent motivator, but 
he encouraged the team to really 
strive to new heights. The com- 
mitment and the desire for ev- 
eryone to play hockey has always 
been there. 

Senior co-captain Amy 
Tiernan, who has been a member 
of the team for four years, has 
seen the program come a long 
way. After winning the Women' s 
Ice Hockey Club Championship 



in '92 and '93, the team had seen 
some added pressure in the '93- 
'94 season to excel and to live up 
to their winning tradition. Amy 
said, "We have played competi- 
tively against a lot of varsity teams 
which we haven't beaten yet. To 
play that competitively and be in 
the game every second of the 
game is a victory for us, even 
though it may not have shown it 
on the scoreboard." 

Beating Bowdoin for the 
first time in the previous year, 
and then beating them again this 
past year, was a big highlight for 
the team. Harvard was another 
team that they concentrated on 
beating again for the second time. 

Amy Tiernan tried to be a 
morale booster and tried to help 
all of the underclassmen adjust to 
student life. Amy said, "I wanted 
to keep everyone happy and keep 
the fun, the humor, and the ex- 
citement alive in the sport." 

The captains agreed that 
this type of team spirit, along 
with Coach Tom O'Malley's se- 
rious, yet upbeat attitude, has al- 
lowed the team to reach the suc- 
cess that it has and to live up to 
their motto, "Hockey with a 
Smile." 

Deborah McNamara 



"I wanted to keep everyone happy and keep the 
fun, the humor, and the excitement alive in the 

Sport. Amy Tiernan 



Women's Hockey 213 



Spirit Carries Divided 

Team Through Tough 

Season 



It was the fourth Big East 
game that season. Challenger? 
Georgetown. Before the game the 
team discussed the season' s goal: 
to defeat a Big East team. The 
players were psyched and the 
coach was eager to grasp the so 
near victory. The goal was in 
sight, but the team' s spirit carried 
them only to eleven points in the 
fifth game-not enough to pull off 
the victory. 

"Even though we did not 
win, I was happy," second year 
Coach Nadine Lilavois com- 
mented when reflecting upon that 
game, "we played up to our po- 
tential." She then continued by 
explaining that the true goal was 
not an actual win, but for the 
team to play to its ability. 

Senior co-captain Jeanne 
Broussard agreed with her coach. 
As a consistent offensive and 
defensive player, Broussard led 
the team with her positive atti- 
tude and hard working nature. 
The senior's example and strong 
character were said to be an in- 
spiration to other players on and 



off the court. 

Junior co-captain Jeanette 
Gaehwiler sat out early in the 
season with a back injury, but 
enthusiastically picked up play 
mid-season. Other outstanding 
Along with the upperclassmen, 
the team's talent lied in its youth. 
Freshman Deanna Herman led 
the team in starts. By playing 
several positions with a "fighting 
spirit," she and setter, Katie Trine, 
also a freshman, saw playing time 
in preparation for the future. Front 
row force Kristen Robert's in- 
timidating presence and Chris- 
tine Morelli's powerful attacks 
proved that all sophomores have 
to offer to the team's future is 
optimism. 

Though Coach Lilavois 
and the players did admit that a 
Big East win would have been 
important for the reputation of 
the team and inspirational for fu- 
ture seasons, they also contended 
that the experience gained from 
team play and constant interac- 
tion with others was more im- 
portant than victories. 

Holly Schwartz 



"...We played up to 
our potential." 

Head Coach Nadine Lilavois 






214 Volleyball 





RESULTS 




BC OPP 






1 3 


Loyola 




2 3 


St. Mary's 




1 3 


Bradley 




3 


St. Louis 




1 3 


Wisconsin Green Bay 




3 


Northeastern Illinois 




3 1 


Northeastern 




3 


Harvard 




3 


Navy 




1 3 


Pennsylvania 




3 


Canisius 




3 


Dartmouth 




1 3 


Hartford 




3 


Syracuse 




3 


Colgate 




2 3 


Army 




1 3 


Providence 




1 3 


Hartford 




3 1 


Central Connecticut 




3 


Yale 




3 1 


Northeastern 




3 


Villanova 




2 3 


Geargetown 




3 


George Mason 




3 


Holy Cross 




3 


Seton Hall 




3 


Rhode Island 




3 


Pittsburgh 




3 


Connecticut 




3 2 


Central Connecticut 




3 


Providence 




9-22 


OVERALL RECORD 





Claudcttc BauliMJ 



Volleyball 215 




216 Swimming 




Family Atmosphere 

During a Successful 

Season 



The highlight of the 1993- 
94 men 's swimming season were 
the National Catholics held at 
Notre Dame. Coach Tom Groden 
and Co-captains Nick Satovick, 
Mickey Burns, and Bob Yap led 
the team into the meet with a 5-2 
record. B.C finished third which 
was the highest placement of a 
non-scholarship team. Highlights 
included first place by Senior 
Mike Mangan, second place by 
Sophomore Scott Cornick, and 
third place by Junior John Webber 
in the 100 Yard Breast Stroke. 
First place awards in the 200 
Medley Relay went to Senior 
Mickey Burns, Senior Mike 
Mangan, Senior Nick Satovick, 
and Junior John Webber. Mickey 
Burns commented on the season, 
"I'm lucky as a senior to be a 
member of a squad that has seen 
a lot of success." 



The Women ' s S wimming 
Team also placed third in the 
National Catholics behind 
LaSalle and Notre Dame. High- 
lights of their season included a 
win over West Point where 
achievement awards were given 
to Megan Lammon for Outstand- 
ing Performer and Holly Bickle 
for Outstanding Performance. 
Another big win was Providence. 
Amy Dunleavey won the Out- 
standing Performer and Megan 
Pozzi won the Outstanding Per- 
formance. The seniors on the team 
were Christine Arrascade, 
Heather Bickle, Kristen Downey, 
Melissa Hambly, Kristin 
Rauscher, and Maria De Lourdes 
Valerio. Kristen Downey said, 
"We worked really hard, the 
freshmen helped out and we had 
a great time. We will all miss 
each other." 



"We worked really hard, the fresh- 
men helped out and we had a great 
time. We will all miss each other." 

Kristen Downey 



Swimming 217 



Camaraderie and 
the Will to Win 



The 1993-94 Men's Ice 
Hockey Team saw their share of 
great victories, accomplishments, 
and memories as they displayed 
both a will to win and a strong 
friendship for one another. Under 
head coach Steve Cedorchuk and 
assistant coaches Mark Leach, 
Jim Logue, and Ed Rauseo, the 
team was able to use the vital 
tactics set forth by the coaches to 
chalk up some of those crucial 
wins. Much of the team ' s success 
was attributed to the talent and 
leadership of the team's three 
seniors and tri-captains, Mike 
Spalla, Jack Callahan, and John 
Joyce. Coach Cedorchuk said, 



"These are three of the best lead- 
ers I have seen in my entire 
nineteen years at B.C." 

The versatility of Mike 
Spalla who played both forward 
and defense helped give the team 
the extra drive it needed to win. 
For the 1992-93 season, he earned 
the Norman F. Dailey Award as 
the team's Most Valuable Player. 
His love for the sport was also 
shown in his love for the team. 
Spalla said, "The team is a family 
oriented group of people. We all 
stand behind one another, push 
each other, and play for each other 
and our fellow classmates." 

CONTINUED ON PAGE 221 



"These are three of the best leaders 
I have seen in my entire nineteen 
years at B.C." 

Head Coach Steve Cedorchuk 



218 Men's Hockey 




■ 




Men's Hockey 219 




220 Men's Hockey 




CONTINUED FROM PAGE 218 

Jack Callahan, a proven 
scorer who was also tremendous 
on the power-play, had accumu- 
lated over 50 career goals. He felt 
that this year was not only about 
playing hockey, but about being 
with the team made up of a great 
bunch of guys. Callahan also said, 
"Coach Cedorchuk has brought 
the program around and it is on 
the right track for a better future." 

John Joyce, one of the 
more vocal leaders of the team, 
demonstrated his leadership by 
keeping after the rest of the 
players. According to Cedorchuk, 
he was the most improved player 
since his freshman year, and for 
that achievement, he won the 
1992-93 James A. Tiernan Me- 
morial Award. In speaking of his 
experience with the team, Joyce 
said, "I have seen the best four 



years of hockey. We are like a 
family in that we feel we are the 
closest bunch of kids around." 

Their will to win was 
shown in the 6-5 victory against 
Vermont at the start of the season 
as well as their win over UNH 8- 
2 making it the first time in two 
years in which B.C. beat them at 
home. Other highlights included 
beating Cornell 5-2 and shutting 
out Army 9-0 which was the first 
time Army was shut out in 100 
games. Their win against Army 
gave B.C. its 1000th victory. 
Another exciting victory was 
beating the nationally ranked 
Maine. 

Both the coaches and the 
players agree that the leadership 
and the closeness of the team 
allowed the players to experience 
the victories and the friendships 
that they have deserved. 

Deborah McNamara 



"Coach Cedorchuk has brought the 
program around and it is on the 
right track for a better future." 

Jack Callahan 



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Men's Hockey 221 









222 Men's Hockey 




Men's Hockey 223 




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224 Men's Basket ball 



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Last Minute Play 

Proves Critical in 

Determining 

Eagles' Fate 



The Men's Basketball 
Team kicked off the 1993-94 
season with an impressive 7-0 
record. Among these victories 
were the Big East opener at 
Syracuse in the Carrier Dome and 
a road trip to Arizona State. 

In late December, the 
Eagles participated in the Maui 
Invitational which included 
Chaminade, Ohio State, Arizona, 
Texas and Kentucky. B.C. set a 
tournament record beating 
Chaminade in the first round by 
over 40 points. They lost the next 
game to powerhouse Arizona in 
the final two minutes. In the 
consolation game they took on 
Big Ten opponent Ohio State and 
lost by two points. 

The Eagles opened con- 
ference play in Conte Forum with 
a strong win over Villanova. They 
travelled to the undefeated Big 
East rival UConn led by Donyell 
Marshall. Freshman Danya 
Abrams stepped up to play a big 
role, but UConn held off B.C. 
Next on the schedule were the 
Pirates of Seton Hall in New 
Jersey, where questionable offi- 
ciating led to a heartbreaking loss. 

Malcolm Huckaby hit a 
three at the end of the first half to 
tie the game against Miami in 
Conte Forum. B.C. came out in 
the second half and dominated 



the Hurricanes and went on to a 
20 point victory. Three days later 
Pittsburgh came to the Forum for 
an important conference game. 
At the time, five teams were tied 
with 3-2 records in the confer- 
ence. B .C. built up a 1 2 point lead 
coming out of the second half, 
but once again the the final min- 
utes determined the outcome of 
the game. They needed a three to 
tie the game, but trouble 
inbounding the ball did not give 
B.C. enough time to get a shot 
off. This put the Eagles at 3-3 in 
the Big East Conference. 

The Holy Cross game 
ended B.C.'s shooting slump. 
Gerrod Abrams, getting only his 
second start of the season, pro- 
duced 17 points for the Eagles. 
Head Coach Jim O' Brien inserted 
Gerrod Abrams into the starting 
lineup replacing Freshman 
Keenan Jourdan to create more 
offense. 

The Providence game got 
off to an exciting start when 
Gerrod Abrams took a fast break. 
With a one handed dunk he 
shattered the backboard which 
caused Conte Forum to erupt. 
After a half an hour delay to switch 
the backboards and sweep the 
floor, the Eagles played well and 
won the game. 



Men's Basketball 225 




226 Men's Basketball 



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Underdogs Stun 
the Nation 

Historical upsets in football, hockey, and 
basketball brought hysteria to the Heights ! 



To be a part of BC this year could not have 
been more thrilling. It was the most momentous 
year in Boston College sports history. From South 
Bend, to the Boston Garden, to Maryland and Mi- 
ami, the underdog Eagles shocked all by rising to 
the occasions. 

It all began on November 20, 1993 when a 
certain scoreboard in Indiana read 4 1-39. The foot- 
ball team crushed the #1 ranked Fighting Irish with 
a last second field goal kick. 

The Beanpot Tournament in early Febru- 
ary ranked the hockey team last among its com- 
petitors: BU, Northeastern, and Harvard. The first 
game paired BC with Northeastern. A double over- 
time goal decided this game, giving BC a 5-4 vic- 
tory. The championship game was against Harvard, 
ranked #2 nationally. Using a defensive strategy, 
the Eagles allowed only one goal by the Crimson. 
Scoring with seven minutes left in the third period 
to tie the game, BC's strong defense sent the game 
to sudden death overtime. After 1 1 minutes, the 
Eagles brought home the Beanpot trophy for the 
first time in 1 1 years. 




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Dan Levasseur 



Sports Supplement - 1994 Sub Turn 



Matthew West 






The basketball team had something to 
prove as well. They too had the desire to show the 
sports crazed world that they were worthy and ca- 
pable of playing against and beating the #1 team 
in the nation. For the first time since 1985, they 
made it into the NCAA Tournament, bringing 
March Madness home to the Heights. 

The first trip was to Maryland where the 
#9 ranked Eagles beat #8 ranked Washington State 
by a score of 67-64. As BC advanced to the sec- 
ond round, they were met by none other than the 
best team in the country, the North Carolina Tar 
Heels. For inspiration, they watched the football 
highlight film of BC's victory over Notre Dame. 
Words such as unbelievable, amazing, or phenom- 
enal did not even come close to describing the feel- 
ings or the impact that was made as BC upset the 
Tar Heels 75-72. The win not only denied NC a 
14th consecutive Sweet Sixteen appearance, it also 
caused sheer pandemonium among the student 
body, and acted as motivation as BC went on to 
face its next challenger - the Indiana Hoosiers. 

Who would have believed that BC would 
have continued success at Miami in the Sweet Six- 
teen against another top-ranked team? Well, 
enough people had faith and the dream came true. 
At the end of the game, the score was 77-68, BC 
on top. 

Although BC lost to the Florida Gators in 
the Elite Eight, the team's determination and hard 
work was an inspiration to all. They went in as 
underdogs and came out as victors, especially in 
the minds of all of BC. 

The three monumental victories in 1993- 
1994 were both exciting and historical. Three un- 
derdog teams, three last minute victories, three 
teams with national respect. The football, hockey, 
basketball, and all other teams brought entertain- 
ment and spirit to students and faculty. Your hard 
work and dedication was greatly appreciated and 
will never be forgotten. 

Stephen Antonik 
Deborah McNamara 



1994 Sub Turri - Sports Supplement 




Matthew West 



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Stephen J. Antonik 

Men's Basketball 227 




228 Men's Basketball 




Men's Basketball 229 




2M) Men's Basketball 






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Men's Basketball 231 




Front Row: Manager Jennifer Hatch, Brad Christianson, Malcolm Huckaby, Gcrrocl Abram, Head Coach Jim O'Bri 
Howard Fiisley, Marc Molinsky, Kevin Hrobowski, Manager Gerard Caruso. 
Back Row: Associate Head Coach Rick Boyages, Assistant Coach Dave Spiller, Bcvan Thomas, Danya Abrams, Pa 
Grant, Bill Curley, Robert Blackwell, Jr., Keenan Jourdon, Administrative Assistant Larry Greer, Assistant Coach Pa 
Biancardi, Manager C ireg Bbben. 



232 Men's Basketball 




Eagles Power 

Through 

Midseason 



The Eagles have put to- 
gether an impressive stretch of 
four straight wins against their 
Big East opponents. Since their 
disappointing loss to Pittsburgh, 
the Eagles have improved their 
offense and increased their de- 
fensive pressure. 

The Providence Friars 
visited Conte Forum where they 
had successfully beaten B.C. 
twice last year. After Gerrod 
Abram shattered the backboard 
with his montrous dunk the Eagles 
prevailed. Danya Abrams pro- 
vided 20 rebounds, a Big East 
freshman record, which helped 
control the inside play. " [Gerrod' s 
backboard breaking jam] was an 
exciting play for the team and the 
fans. It got the crowd into it and 
that helped us. The win was great 
revenge for getting beat three 
times in a row. It gave us the 
confidence to believe that if we 
play well, we can beat any team, 
any night," said Howard Eisley. 

They next had to travel to 
St. John's where they have not 
had much success in the past. 



Playing St. John's for the first 
time in the regular season at 
Madison Square Garden, B.C. ran 
away with the victory with strong 
performances from both Howard 
Eisley and Bill Curley. 

Returning home, Coach 
O ' Brien asked the fans to increase 
their noise and cheer consistently 
for the players. In nationally 
televised games against Seton 
Hall and Georgetown the fans 
responded. The student section 
provided enough support against 
Seton Hall. Again the leadership 
of Howard Eisley and Bill Curley 
led the way to another impressive 
win for B.C. 

B.C. battled Georgetown 
in a midseason matchup. The 
Eagles came out strong, showing 
their talent early. In the second 
half the Eagles let the Hoy as back 
into the game by not scoring a 
field goal in over 7 minutes, al- 
lowing Georgetown to tie the 
score. Late in the game the Eagles 
pulled away and secured the 
victory. 

Chris Deeley 



"[Gerrod's backboard breaking jam] was an 
exciting play for the team and the fans. It got 
the crowd into it and that helped us. The win 
was great revenge for getting beat three times 
in a row. It gave us the confidence to believe 
that if we play well, we can beat any team, any 

night." Howard Eisley 

Men's Basketball 233 



Arm I.ul/ 



Overcoming the 

Odds and Proving 

to Be a Force 



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Talent, hard work, and a 
new coaching staff, allowed the 
women's basketball team to see 
more Big East victories this year 
than they had seen in the last two 
years combined. With new Head 
Coach Cathy Inglese and Assis- 
tant Coaches Keith Cieplicki, 
Robin Garrett, and MaryBeth 
Tobin, the team had improved a 
great deal fundamentally. This 
gave the players the tools to beat 
the pre-season odds of finishing 
tenth in the Big East, and instead, 
they ended the season in the up- 
per rankings of the Big East 
Conference. 

Senior co-captains Kerry 
Curran and Michele Verotsky 
proved to be great leaders as the 
team went on to beat Holy Cross 
by a score of 88-80 in overtime as 
well as Syracuse (73-70), Miami 
(80-71), Georgetown (75-69), 
and Villanova twice. Both Kerry 
Curran as guard and freshman 
forward Holly Porter proved to 



be leading scorers. Curran and 
junior guard Joanie Gallagher 
racked up the assists while 
Verotsky as forward/center and 
Porter were the overall high 
rebounders. 

Kerry Curran said, "This 
year has been the most gratifying 
of my four years at B.C. The 
continuity and the camaraderie 
of the team made it really easy for 
us to work together. I consider 
the players a great group of 
teammates and friends." In ret- 
rospect, Michele Verotsky said , 
"As a whole the team contributed, 
whether the players were getting 
in the game or not. The basketball 
program is headed in the right 
direction, and I am glad to have 
been a part of something new." 

With the outstanding 
coaching ability of Inglese, the 
team saw a bright season and is 
hoping to be an even stronger 
force in seasons to come. 

Deborah McNamara 



"This year has been the most gratifying of my 
four years at B.C. The continuity and the 
camaraderie of the team made it really easy for 
us to work together. I consider the players a 
great group of teammates and friends." 

Kerry Curran 




pi 








234 Women's Basketball 



■ ■! — .■!»■■ 



Ml I'll,. i.. !■■. I'. 




Photo Courtesy of Boston College Sports Informal 



"** 



Front Row: Toya Squair, Joanie Gallagher, Lori Kasten, Michele Verotsky, Kerry Curran, Angela Crowder, Jennifer 
Passonno. Audrey Bowersox. 

Back Row: Head Coach Cathy Inglese, Assistant Coach Keith Cieplicki, Holly Porter, Kelly Regan, Cecilee Campbell, Tia 
Manhardt, Aimee Ostapowicz, Assistant Coach Robin Garrett, Assistant Coach MaryBeth Tobin. 



Women's Basketball 235 




236 Women's Basketball 




Women's Basketball 237 



Strong Bats From 
Beanpot To Big East 

in the spring of '93 



The 1993 Spring Base- 
ball Team, under the direction of 
Coach Richard "Moe" Maloney, 
experienced great triumphs and 
exciting games. Backed by strong 
talent, the team went head to head 
with the Boston Red Sox, battled 
through tough games in The Big 
East, and won the Beanpot. 

To start off the season, on 
March 15, 1993, the team played 
the Red Sox to a sell-out crowd in 
Fort Meyers, Florida. All thirty- 
three members of the B.C. team 
played in the game and went on to 
lose by a score of 2-0. Coach 
Maloney said the Red Sox were 
impressed with the Eagles' per- 
formance. 

Among the highlights of 
their respectable 22-14 record, 
the three game series against 
Pittsburgh at home was unprec- 
edented. Coach Maloney said, 
"The second game of that series 
was one of the most emotional 
games I've ever coached." B.C. 
lost the first game 21-1 and then, 
in the second game, won on a balk 
in the bottom of the ninth with the 
score tied 8-8. 

Co-captain and second 
baseman Mike Martin was one of 



the team leaders in hitting for the 
'93 season. With a batting aver- 
age of .462, he was third in the 
country. He was named to the 3rd 
Team All- America and to the All- 
Region 1 st Team. In looking back, 
he said, "I'd like to thank Coach 
Maloney for the opportunity to 
have played since my freshman 
year, and I will never forget all 
the friendships that I made." 

Co-captain and outfielder 
Pete Carmichael who batted .321 
said, "Since everyone on the team 
gives 100%, it makes my job as 
co-captain much easier." The 
other seniors who will be missed 
are Alex McKenna, a pitcher and 
scholar athlete, and James 
Werme, an outstanding third 
baseman. Coach Maloney said, 
"These four guys are the nucleus 
of the team and an asset to the 
school." 

Another high point of the 
season included winning their 
third out of four Beanpots. By 
beating Harvard in the final game, 
the Eagles extended their overall 
record at Fenway Park to 7-1. 
They tied for fourth place in The 
Big East and had a '93 fall record 
of 6-1. 

Deborah McNamara 



"...I will never forget all the friend- 
ships that I made." 

Mike Martin 

"...Everyone on the team gives 

100%...'' Pete Carmichael 

238 Baseball 





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Photo Courtesy of Boston College Sports Informtiliora 

Front Row: Brian Sankey. Jayme Varao. Tarez McNeil, Torrance McNeil. Matt Essick. Rich Dilorio, 

Sean Lynch. 

Second Row: Pete Carmichael. Andrew Brown, Joe Hayward. Chris Higgins, Tom Mandile, Derek 

Fergus, Lou Talarico. 

Third Row: Head Coach Richard "Moc" Maloney, Michael Martin, Mike Aiena, Brian Cody, Matt 

Walsh, Mark Beltencourt. Mall Dorscy. Curt Romboli, Joel Malo, Greg King, Assistant Coach Chip 

Forrest, Assistant Coach Derek Twombly. 

Back Row: Bryan Manahan, Keith Frankcl, Mark Faggiano, Rich Levrault, Sean Curtin, Steve 

Migliero, Kyle Hamburg. James Werme. 



Marty Nagcl 



Baseball 239 




240 Softball 




Talent of Players 

Outweighs 

Inexperience 

in the spring of '93 



"If anything was going to 
make or break the season it was 
going to be the defense - we knew 
we had the offense to win games," 
explained Sue Corwin about the 
1993 softball season. Before 
regular play began, the team 
didn ' t know what to expect. With 
ten new freshmen, several filling 
starting positions, nobody was 
quite sure how this building year 
would end. 

The spring definitely had 
its good and bad times. A suc- 
cessful trip to Ft. Meyers, Florida, 
and finishing third in the Big East 
Conference were among the 
season's highlights. 

Making the conference 
tournment was the biggest ac- 
complishment for the team. 
However, they experienced two 
emotional loses. The first was 
against Big East rival Providence. 
The team fought back to over- 
come a four run deficit in the last 



two innings only to be defeated in 
extra innings. The second heart- 
breaker was against Villanova 
where the Eagle's pitcher had a 
no hitter stolen from her with a 
home run in the final inning for a 
1-0 lose. 

Although the season was 
not as successful as they would 
have liked, the players learned 
from defensive and mental er- 
rors. "It was great," concluded 
1994 Senior Captain Angela 
Macsenti about the spring of 1 993 , 
"everyone played well together, 
and Coach McGuire was enthusi- 
astic and supportive throughout 
the season." 

Coach McGuire plans to 
institute a no excuses regiment 
into the upcoming season. Even 
though the team is still very 
young, and two pitchers were lost, 
the talent of the players far out- 
weigh their inexperience. 

Holly Schwartz 



"If anything was going to make or 
break the season it was going to be 
the defense - we knew we had the 
offense to win games." swcorwin 



Softball 241 



Photo Courtesy of Angela Macscnii 



Positive Attitude And 

Enthusiasm Leads to 

Success Beyond 

Victory 

in the spring of '93 



A tough schedule did not 
stop the Women' s Lacrosse Team 
from playing a strong, consistent 
season and finishing with a six 
and eight record. Led by Senior 
Captains Lisa Doty, Ann Hyland, 
and Shannon Doyle, the team 
completed a successful season 
both offensively and defensively. 

Boston College' s shutout 
against Holy Cross highlighted 
the team' s offensive players who 
each scored once to contribute to 
the victory. Joannie Solomine and 
Lisa Doty led the great defensive 
plays against Yale, while Bryn 
Chave captured a valuable five 
goals for the win over Colgate. 

The efforts of the entire 
team were essential in playing 
eight of the top fifteen teams in 
the nation. "We had a lot of re- 
spect for each other as team 
members," believed Captain 
Shannon Doyle. "We were com- 
mitted to team work." 

The battle against the 
University of New Hampshire 
demonstrated the positive con- 
nection between offense and de- 
fense. With Christine Curley and 
Shannon Doyle excelling offen- 
sively, every teammate pulled 
together to play one of the best 
team games of the season. 

How was the team's uni- 



fication created? Doyle believed, 
"We really were on an equal plain. 
We learned that from the older 
players our freshman year." By 
eliminating class distinction and 
respecting each player, the team 
could focus on playing the 
nation's top teams tough, and 
playing together. 

The five Seniors, Captains 
Doty, Doyle, and Hyland, along 
with Curley and Solomine, were 
a key to the success of the team on 
and off the field. Doty's unbe- 
lievable defensive record and 
communication skills were cru- 
cial to the team, and so, too, were 
Doyle's offensive abilities and 
assist records. Curley lead offen- 
sive scoring with 33 goals. 

The team also looked to- 
ward the younger players for 
strength, with Lisa Taylor excel- 
ling in leadership, and Beth 
Holleran on defense. Strength was 
also derived from the positive 
attitude of sixth year Coach 
Sharene Granese, and second year 
Assistant Coach Kristen 
McCarthy. 

Whether freshman or se- 
nior, offense or defense, on the 
bench or scoring, the Women's 
Lacrosse team was bound to- 
gether by determination and a 
strive for victory. 

Stacey Dijon 



242 Women's Lacrosse 




Phoio I ourtcsy ni the Heights 



This Page Photos Courtesy of Shannon Doyle 




Women's Lacrosse 243 




244 Mlmi's Lacrosse 




Overcoming the 
Adversity of Nature 
and the Opposition 

in the spring of '93 



Faced with harsh winds 
and blustering snow, the men's 
lacrosse team was able to pull off 
a 7-8 record for the spring 1993 
season. The team got off to a 
rocky start when they were not 
able to practice outside under 
terrible weather conditions at the 
start of the season. But the Bos- 
ton College stickmen rebounded 
mid season with a five game 
winning streak. 

The highlight of the sea- 
son was the game against New 
Hampshire. The team was fired 
up to seek revenge on last year's 
heartbreaking loss. This monu- 
mental win gave the struggling 
team the confidence they needed 
to conquer their future opponents. 

The team's unanimous 
MVP was junior co-captain Rich 
"Merk"linger. Also playing a 



major role in the success of the 
team were Billy Ohlmer, senior 
attackman, who was awarded as 
the most improved player on the 
team and the leading goal scorer, 
and Jamie Egan, senior 
midfielder, who was co-captain 
of the team. 

An optimistic attitude was 
a key factor in the team's 
consistant season. Andrew 
Fellingham, a midfielder on the 
team, reflected on a season, "full 
of hard work and much success." 
Brian Shanley, also a midfielder 
on the squad, echoed 
Fellingham' s optimism. "This 
team has a lot of talent." Men's 
Lacrosse fans enjoyed eagerness 
and spirit on the field which led 
the team to an excellent showing. 

Elizabeth Mignone 



"This team has a lot of talent." 

Brian Shanley 



Men's Lacrosse 245 



Rapid Expansion 

Leads to New 

Challenges 



The Boston College Crew 
Team has been growing phe- 
nomenally since its beginning in 
the fall of 1987. The 162 member 
team [fall of 1 993] rows on a four 
mile stretch of the upper Charles 
River. They train on the water 
during the fall and spring and 
indoors during the winter months. 

The primary racing sea- 
son is the spring; but the most 
celebrated race is the well-known 
Head of the Charles Regatta 
which is conducted on the third 
weekend in October. The varsity 
men's heavyweight eight placed 
16 out of 47 boats at the famed 
Head of the Charles Regatta. 
Senior Michael Scanlon com- 
mented on the race. "We were 
pleased with our performance 
having passed six boats. This 
was a big step. It brought us 
respect within the rowing com- 
munity." The varsity men's 
lightweight eight placed 25 out 
of 34 and the varsity women's 
open eight placed 26 out of 35. 

The varsity teams also 
raced at the Head of the Con- 
necticut and the Head of the 
Textile Regattas during the fall 
season. The varsity women's 
open eight brought home the gold 
from the Head of the Textile 
Regatta. Senior Gail Piazza said, 
"When we finished the race, we 
knew we had a great row. Re- 
ceiving a metal didn't really 
matter, but when the results came 



in and our boat had the winning 
time, it felt good to bring home 
our first gold medal of the season. " 

The varsity men's 
heavyweight eight took second 
place. Other fall races include the 
MIT Invitational and the Foot of 
the Charles. The varsity men took 
third and fourth place at the MIT 
Invitational and the varsity 
women placed third as well. The 
novice women pulled out a sec- 
ond place standing at the MIT 
Invitational while the novice men 
took third and fifth place. 

In the spring of 1993, B.C. 
made some serious waves fin- 
ishing the season ranked third in 
Division II competition in the 
New England area. On an indi- 
vidual basis the women's novice 
1st and 2nd eights both took 
golds at the New England 
Championship Regatta while the 
men's novice heavyweight eight 
took fourth and the men's novice 
lightweight eight took sixth. 

On the varsity level, the 
women's varsity open four re- 
ceived gold medals while the 
women ' s varsity lightweight eight 
placed second and the men's 
varsity heavyweight four finished 
third. At the Champion National 
Regatta, the women's varsity 
open four took second and the 
women's varsity lightweight eight 
placed third and the novice 
women's open eight finished 
fourth. 

Jon Stocco 



246 Crew 








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Crew 247 










Our lives here at Boston College are what we make of 
them. Many of us try to make the most of it by taking 
advantage of the opportunities offered us. A few, how- 
ever, have not only grabbbed at these opportunities, they 
have also created paths for others to follow. They are the 
leaders by leading and by serving others, whether it be as 
a student or as a teacher. Through their actions, they have 
exemplified the spirit of excellence. Whether it be on a 
court or in a classroom, as a coordinator behind the 
scenes or a conductor in front of the crowd, these indi- 
viduals have touched others through their enthusiasm 
and dedication. They have shown us that this was indeed 
a time for excellence. 



J?<%ze &rJ&T3&nys 





erspecuves # 



C hristine Curley is a familiar face to many on 
campus, but very few people will recognize her 
name. The reason for this is because everyone, 
from roommates to professors, call her "Critter". 
She has her brother to thank for the unusual 
nickname she has had since she was two years old. 
Christine was the youngest "critter" of eight chil- 
dren in her family and, as a result, the name caught 
on quickly. When the nuns at her high school 
would call down the hall, "Good luck in the game 
today Critter!", and the local reporters wrote 
about another one of Critter Curley ' s exceptional 
performances, she knew that the name had stuck. 
However, it seems appropriate for such a unique 

nc Being a member of a close 

group of people is such a 

rewarding experience. [And 

I've been lucky enough to be a 

part oj two... ," 



person to have an equally unique name. 

Although Christine grew up in the back- 
yard of Villanova, in Radner, Pennsylvania, she 
always had her heart set on coming to Boston 
College. She was attracted to the Heights not only 
for its excellent academic tradition, but also for its 
strong athletic program. As an outstanding ath- 
lete, she found a new home on Boston College's 
field hockey team and quickly became one of its 
most valuable players. There was one problem 
hindering Christine, however, lack of focus and a 
desire for something more. Christine remembers, 
"My coach kept catching me watching the la- 
crosse team warm up instead of paying attention 
to the drill at hand. Since Sherren Granesse is the 
coach of both the field hockey and lacrosse teams, 
she offered a solution to my problem. She sug- 
gested I play both." Christine had played field 
hockey since fifth grade but had relatively little 
experience with lacrosse. "I played on a club 
team in high school, but it was hard to judge my 
ability. I didn't think that I could compete at the 
Division I level." Apparently she had seriously 
underestimated her talent. By the end of her 
freshman year Christine became the only girl at 
Boston College to play both field hockey and 
lacrosse. By the end of her senior year she was 
named to second team All Big East for field 
hockey, and had contributed greatly to the im- 
provement and success of both teams. 

As an English major with a concentra- 
tion in Sociology, Christine' scourseload kept her 
reading and writing at all times. She can usually 
be found in the library every afternoon, after 
classes and before practice. Christine described 
her academic experience as a positive one, "My 
education al Boston College has given me the 
opportunity to study a variety of subjects. I feel 
thai a solid liberal arts background is the best way 
to prepare lor any career." 



With all 
of the time de- 
mands of two var- 
sity sports, it is es- 
sential for Chris- 
tine to find a bal- 
ance between ath- 
letics and academ- 
ics. She achieves 
this by budgeting 
her time wisely. 
"Every minute of 
every day is 
scheduled from the 
moment I wake up 
to the moment I go 
to sleep," she ex- 
plained. "Some- 
times it's difficult 
to see people 
around me who 
have so much 
freedom and time 
to spare. But, I like 
to think positive 
and I have really 
learned to appre- 
ciate days off when 
they do come." 

Even 
though she has had 
to sacrifice some 
of her personal 
freedom and social 
life due to her 
commitment to her 
teams, Christine 
has no complaints. 
"Being a member 
of a close group of 
people is such a 

rewarding experience. And I've been lucky 
enough to be part of two. Looking back, I can't 
imagine what my life would have been like if I 
hadn't played for both teams. The hard work and 
dedication we undergo on a daily basis on the 
field really brings us together off the field. I have 
made lifelong friends and have many wonderful 




Christine Curley 



Paul Hezel 



"I have made lifelong 

friends and have many 

wonderful memories to take 

with me when my days at 

^Boston College are over. " 



memories to take with me when my days at 
Boston College are over," she concluded. 

Will there be life after Boston College 
for Christine? She feels that "it will be hard to 
leave but I think il is lime to move on. 1 have 
accomplished the goals I set for myself and now 



I'm ready to face the future." After graduation 
she hopes to continue her education and perhaps 
teach and coach at the high school level. She also 
anticipates carrying on her athletics by playing 
both sports in community leagues. However, she 
will miss the hectic yet gratifying aspects of life 
as a double athlete, "It's the competition that I 
love. That edge. The organization, the uniforms, 
the referees, the rivalries with other schools. 
Those are the things that I will be sad to see go." 
When the last whistle blows and her 
time at Boston College is over and done, Christinei 
"Critter" Curley will continue to seek new chal- 
lenges both on and off the field. No doubt, shei 
will emerge a victor, ever to excel. 

Karen Scannell, A&S '94' 



250 



'iJaily planners, appointments, and telephone 
nessages take on a whole new meaning when 
tpplied to Naney Drane. As UGBC president, 
Mancy is undoubtedly one of the most active and 
risible figures on campus . Her executive posi- 
ion. besides requiring her attendance at numer- 
ius meetings and events, enables her to act as 
iaison between the student body and BC admin- 
stration: an opportunity that she takes seriously. 
Nancy sees herself as a mouthpiece for 
he students, and cites their representation as her 
hief function. Her primary means of eliciting 
heir views is simply by talking to a wide range of 
tudents. She then relays their opinions to the 
iniversity heads during their frequent encoun- 
ers. Nancy admits, however, that hers is not 
ilways an easy task since the views of the student 
xjdy are often at odds with those of the adminis- 
ration. Her unique position requires her to identify 
vith both standpoints, acknowledging the short- 
erm. more personal motivations of the student 
iody. while also weighing in the long-term, bu- 
eaucratic rationale of the university. Nonethe- 
less. Nancy keeps her loyalties firmly planted 
vith the students and believes that her greatest 
ictories occur when their perspective can influ- 
nce administrative decisions. She prides herself 
m the fact that she and vice-president Mike 
lozman have been able to challenge the adminis- 
"ation . giving the students greater authority. 

' K The best feeting is when we 

can initiate change and know 

that the students' voice is 

being heard. " 



Besides magnifying the voice of her 
eers. Nancy is dedicated to improving the image 
' f UGBC, both in the eyes of the student body and 
lose of the administration. She feels that stu- 
; ents tend to rate the effectiveness of UGBC by 
le number or quality of concerts and speakers it 
chedules, without acknowledging its other ben- 
ficial programs and services. 

Nancy feels that the greatest advantage 
f being president has been that she now has a 
reater understanding of how things work at the 
Diversity. She knows what's happening and 
> hy. and can appreciate the bureaucracy and red- 
ape that each decision entails. She explains, 
Over the summer I became very pessimistic 
bout the BC administration and how much they 
sally considered the students' viewpoint. As I 
>:ot to know the administrators individually, my 
■pinion started to change, but I am still vigilant 
bout voicing the students' opinion whenever 
>ossible. The best feeling is when we can initiate 
hange and know that the students' voice is being 
leard." 

While Nancy recognizes her role as 
resident to be a prestigious one and sees it as 
•xcellent experience for future endeavors, she 
ikes to keep its importance in perspective. She 



says, "It's only one aspect of my life and I won't 
let my academics or social life suffer as a result." 
Nancy' s government partici- 
pation stems back from freshman year when she 
served on the senate. Sophomore year she adopted 
the title of environmental awareness coordinator 
as part of the social awareness department. Junior 
year she obtained a new cabinet position as vice- 
president of student services. She feels that each 
of these positions have provided her with unique 
insights into the BC community and have pre- 
pared her for her position as president. 

In addition to her prolific experiences 
with UGBC. Nancy has devoted much of her 
college career to the ELP program. The Emerg- 
ing Leader Program provides incoming freshmen 
with the opportunity to meet 50 of their peers and 
work closely with them. The program begins 
with Sargeant Camp, a 7 day retreat that takes 
place the August before freshman year. ELP 
members continue to hold meetings throughout 
their first school year and participate in various 
activities. While the program ends for most 
members after freshman year, Nancy chose to 
continue her involvement sophomore year as a 
facilitator. She became a mentor for ten incoming 
freshmen. As a junior, Nancy was chosen as ELP 
coordinator and was responsible for organizing 
the BC program. 

According to Nancy, "ELP has been one 
of the best experiences 
of my four years here." 
She recommends it to 
incoming students as a 
great opportunity to meet 
their peers as well as up- 
perclassmen. She says, 
"The mentoring aspect 
of the program was ex- 
cellent because we got 
advice from older stu- 
dents and received infor- 
mation about prospective 
clubs and campus activi- 
ties. 

Although her 
post-graduate plans are 
undecided, Nancy hopes 
to devote a few years to 
volunteer work. Her top 
choice, "Teach for 
America," is a 2 year 
commitment that ex- 
poses graduates of all 
majors to urban and ru- 
ral teaching environ- 
ments. While acceptance 
into the program is com- 
petitive and the working 
conditions a challenge, 
Nancy feels that such an 
experience would be 
both rewarding and ful- 
filling. She is also re- 
searching programs such 
as the JVC (Jesuit Vol- 
unteer Corps) and The 



Inner City Teaching Corps. She explains, "As 
recent graduates, we have the chance to commit 
ourselves to experiences that may not relate to our 
career path necessarily, but that we feel strongly 
about. I would hate to miss this opportunity that 
we all have now and regret it later in life when 
life's responsibilities make such commitments 
impossible." 

Subsequent to serving as a volunteer, 
Nancy hopes to continue her education in a mas- 
ters program. Eventually she'd like also to com- 
plete her doctorate, although her course of study 
is undecided. She is currently looking into policy- 
making and higher education administration as 
possible career paths. Her double major in politi- 
cal science and communications should provide 
some background for either. 

Like many of her peers, Nancy contem- 
plates May 23rd with both joy and trepidation. 
Looking back, she has few regrets about her 4 
years on the Heights. Because of the classes she' s 
taken and the experience she's gained, Nancy 
feels confident about entering the "real world." 
She's also certain that the spirit of BC will remain 
with her. She plans to be an active alumnus, not 
only at football games and reunions, but when- 
ever possible. She explains, "I love BC and I've 
had a great 4 years here. There's really not much 
that I'd change about it." 

Shireen Pesez, SOE '94 



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Amy Lui/ 

CNancy ^Drane 



251 



iX hen Howard Eisley came to BC from Detroit 
four years ago, he was a stranger in a new city. 
What attracted him to the east coast was Boston 
College's great reputation. "I love my parents," 
he said, "but I wanted to get out on my own, and 
see if I could make it. BC is such a great school." 
And Howard did make it , accomplishing as 
much off the basketball court as on. A communi- 
cations major, Howard is interested in a possible 
career in journalism. "And if possible. I'd like to 
stay around sports," he said. With Howard, 
anything' s possible. 

Throughout his four years at BC, Howard was 
well aware that his education came before basket- 
ball. And he balanced the two well. "It's kind of 
hard if you don't keep everything in perspective," 
he said. But Howard is proof that athletes at BC 
take their academics seriously. He says his par- 
ents served as role models throughout his life. 
This keeps him motivated. 

Of course, basketball takes up a great deal of 
Howard's time. When he began playing around 
the age of six, he was playing baseball as well. 
"Baseball was my favorite," he said, "but there 
just wasn't enough action." He also ran cross- 
country in high school, but it, too, could not 
compare to the sport Howard loves best. 

Howard sees plenty of action as captain and 
point guard of the Eagles. He's started nearly 
every game since his freshman year. He is one of 
four seniors on the team, with Bill Curley , Malcolm 
Huckaby, and Gerrod Abram. Although Howard 
is looked up to by his teammates, he remains 
modest. "I still think I have a lot to improve on," 
he said. " 

"I put more pressure on my- 
self than anybody else could 
put on me. I want to win and 
be successful..." 

His leadership position on the team is also a 
challenge. "I'm a laid-back type of person," he 
said. "The position I play asks a lot of me, to be 
a leader on the floor. It's out of my character to 
do the things I have to do, but I guess I have to step 
out of it to get it done." 

Howard's teammates are like a family to him; 
they've always gotten along really well. "I think 
we have mutual respect. We all know what we 
can do. we just want what's best for us," he said. 
The goals they set together are for the entire team, 
so it (.Iocs not become "an ego-type thing." And 
Howard's great relationship with coach Jim 
O'Brien, benefits him both on and off the court. 

Some of the highlights of I loward's basketball 
career at BC include beating Georgetown and 
Syracuse in away games his junior year. But he'd 
prefer to be playing al home in Conte forum, 
where he receives enthusiastic support from the 
fans. "When you're at home, it puis pressure on 
the opposite team," he said. He can hear BC fans 

i ering, hut is able to block itouttostay focused 
mi the game. "You hear il. bill you know what you 



have to do. You don't really have too much time 
to get caught up in that," he said. 

Student coach Tom Devitt describes Howard 
as a quiet, private type of guy. "He's very soft 
spoken.," Tom said. "That sometimes is a prob- 
lem because he's a point guard. It took him a 
while to get used to." But Howard is now 
perfectly capable of running plays for his team 
and taking control. 

At BC, Howard has made other friend- 
ships besides his teammates. He said that for the 
most part, he's had good relationships with the 
people he's met. "I've met a lot of good people 
here," he said of the student body. He also said 
that all schools have their stereotypes, but "once 
you get to know people here, they're very likely 
the type of people you'd get along with." 

Howard's had a lot of good professors, and an 
especially helpful team academic advisor, Ferna 
Philips. "She's a person I really look up to and 
respect a lot," he said. "She gives us advice, and 
we can talk to her about anything." 

Howard realizes the importance of his classes 
as well, and knows both the coaches and the 
athletic department are concerned about their 
athletes' educations. "They're very concerned 
about us getting our education. It would be a 
waste of time for us to go here for four years and 
not come out with a 
degree. That would 
be cheating ourselves. 
We take it very seri- 
ously," he said. 

The pressure 
Howard faces both on 
the court and in the 
classroom seems to 
only affect him in a 
positive way. "I try 
not to let others set 
goals for me, " he said. 
"I put more pressure 
on myself than any- 
body else could put 
on me. I want to win 
and be successful..." 

He sets long-term 
goals for himself on 
the court, and also for 
a career after he 
graduates. Howard's 
not sure if he'll stay in 
Boston, go back to 
Detroit, or head else- 
where. "I want to go 
where the best oppor- 
tunities are," he said. 
And so far, BC has 
given him great op- 
portunities. 

The best thing 
Howard likes about 
BC is "being around 
good people who re- 
ally care for you," he 
said. "Everyone 
should experience 



what college life is about. Boston College gives 
you that opportunity." But he said unfortunately 
"it's over so fast." 

Most of Howard's friends would agree that he 
has a warm personality. "He's just so friendly," 
Tom Devitt said. "Everyone on the team looks up 
to him, and considers him the best player." 

Tom thinks Howard's got a definite chance to 
be an NBA draft pick. "He's a good size for his 
position," he said. And Howard deserves a 
chance in the NBA, if he doesn't enter a career in 
journalism right away. "He' s a very hard worker," 
Tom said. "He's in the gym a half hour before 
practice and stays an hour afterwards." 

Part of what makes Howard unique is that he 
is a very private individual. He keeps to himself. 
Most who know him would agree. "He's so 
private," Tom siad. "But he's a riot. He's very 
witty." 

Being the center of attention on the Eagles' 
Basketball team hasn't gone to Howard's head 
one bit. "The spotlight doesn't affect him at all," 
Tom said. "He's just like the kid next door." 

Howard said he will definitely miss BC. "I've 
been through a lot here, all the ups and downs," he 
said. "It's sad to see it end so soon." But in 
reality, graduation is only the beginning. 

Cheryl Mastrogiovanni, A&S '94 




252 



y\ icole Gill is an intelligent, well rounded and 
•nthusiastic Boston College student. Throughout 
ler four years at the university, she has been both 
lighly involved and extremely friendly. One of 
he things she liked best about Boston College 
was the strong sense of community, and ever 
ince freshman year, she has been an integral part 
)f that community. Nikki did not hesitate to 
lecome involved and to try new activities. She 
ilso did not hesitate to spread her positive attitude 
o everyone surrounding her. and instill in them a 
■>art of her enthusiasm. 

For the past two years. Nikki has been a 
esident assistant. Last year she was an RA in 
/oute, and this year she was an RA in St. Thomas 
iAore, the newest dorm on campus. Nikki chose 
O become an RA because she loved her own RA 
reshman year. She said that being an RA was one 
>f the best experiences she ever had, because of 
he leadership skills she gained, and the people 
.he met. She became close with both the people 
m the staff, and the people on her floor. "As an 
IA, I have formed some of the most lasting and 
strongest friendships that I have at BC." Her 
•xperience a an RA in Voute as with seniors, 
vhile her experience in St. Thomas was with 
ophomores. Although these were entirely dif- 
ferent experiences. Nikki said that she learned 
rom both of them, for they were both positive and 
ewarding in their own way. Through the 
'rhanksgiving food drive, and other service 
projects she has helped organize, she has been 
Ible to serve the members of the larger commu- 
iit\ . as well as serve the BC community. This is 
omething she finds to be crucial. 

Nikki has been an integral part of the 
iniversity's debate team. A team which often 
!:oes unnoticed, but maintains its high national 
Ranking, the debate team requires much time, 
effort and talent. She admits that this was a huge 
jime commitment. However, she did not hesitate 
to say that it was worth missing an occasional 
football game. Again, the bonds she formed and 
,he friendships she made were extremely impor- 
ant to her. She explained that she has. "become 
ery close, not only with teammates, but also with 
ny debate coach, she has remained supportive 
ind encouraged me to excel in all my endeavors." 
She admits that it is an honor and an accom- 
ilishment being a member of a #1 team with 
national recognition. Although friends from other 
schools had a hard time understanding her desire 
'o be on the debate team. Nikki appreciated the 
act that her friends at BC always congratulated 
ler when they saw her achievement in The Heights. 
Her Boston College friends recognized the im- 
portance, as well as the talent of their university's 
debate team. 

During her four years at Boston College, 
serving others grew to be a central part of Nikki's 
life. Her freshman year, she signed up for a trip 
to Appalachia during spring break. She spent her 
break building houses in Savannah. Georgia. 
Although she was only one of two freshman, she 
had a great experience. It was here that she 
acquired leadership skills and learned how to 
work effectively with those older than herself. 



Most importantly, 
however, she real- 
ized how impor- 
tant the Jesuit ideal 
of serving others 
was to her. She 
enjoyed her expe- 
rience so much that 
the next year, she 
resided on a com- 
munity living floor 
where she worked 
on several service 
projects. Again, 
she enjoyed the 
sense of commu- 
nity in which stu- 
dents cooperated 
to help those less 
fortunate than 
themselves. 

Nikki said 
that one of the 
things she liked 
best about BC was 
the school spirit, 
and Nikki herself 
embodied that 
spirit. She liked 
the fact that there 
was always some- 
thing different to 
do at BC. She 
reminisced, "My 
most memorable 
experience was 
traveling on a bus 
with fifty other 
students for forty 
hours to watch BC 
beat Notre Dame . " 
Nikki also enjoyed 
attending events 
that she was able 

to take advantage of everything that was offered 
to her. In turn, she was also able to give back a part 
of herself to the school and surrounding commu- 
nity through her experience as an RA and by 
volunteering outside of BC. Nikki showed that it 
is possible to balance a difficult work schedule 
and still become involved on campus. 



"Sfts an HR, I have formed 

some of the most lasting and 

strongest friendships that 

1 haveat/BC" 



Nikki appreciates the Jesuit influence at 
Boston College. She said that there were several 
Jesuit professors whose dedication she will never 
forget. They inspired and encouraged her to 
strive for the best. Nikki herself models the Jesuit 
ideal, "ever to excel ".because she excels in every- 




Jiicoie gUt 



Elizabeth Farrell 



thing she does. She puts her whole heart into all 
the activities she is involved in. Her personality 
also embodies the Jesuit Ideal because no matter 
how busy she is, she will stop to say hello if she 
passes you between classes. 

In the future, Nikki hopes to attend law 
school. One day she would like to see herself 
working in Washington. She was able to gain 
meaningful experience by interning with Senator 
Kennedy and Senator Chafee from her home state 
of Rhode Island. She hopes to pursue this career 
option in years to come. 

It is clear that no matter what she does in the 
future. Nikki will experience success because she 
possesses an enthusiasm and a determination that 
will allow her to continue the significant accom- 
plishments she has achieved at Boston College. 
Christine Honey, A&S '97 



253 



jVl ary Clancy Haack, from Lexington, Ken- 
tucky, has contributed much to Boston College in 
her four years here. A member of the Honor's 
Program and a top ranking student, she has worked 
towards a Human Development major in the 
School of Education, as well as pursued a double 
minor in Math and Music. Her musical talent and 
her perseverance in community service is what 
make this student embody the Boston College 
motto, "ever to excel." She plays the violin with 
the Boston College Symphony Orchestra, and is 
presently concert master. Though very modest, 
she takes pride in her great initiative and contribu- 
tion to BC with the pilot program, "Creative 
Kids"; the first of its kind on a college campus. 
This is a program in which the arts are taught to 
children with special needs on a one-to-one basis, 
with the help of volunteers who assist in the 
instruction. 

Those who know her say Mary Clancy is 
very responsible, caring, compassionate, and most 
of all, modest. Mary Clancy ' s involvement with 
Creative Kids began her Sophomore year when 
she was taking a class with her advisor, Professor 
Penny Hauser-Cram. She was interested in work- 
ing with an organization called "Very Special 
Arts" which was founded by Jean Kennedy 
Smith. This is a branch of the Kennedy Center for 
the Arts in Washington, DC, and is a non-profit 




Mary Clancy Jiaack 



organization that does arts programs for people 
with special needs. Mary Clancy offered to pick 
Jean Kennedy Smith up from the airport, when 
she was scheduled to arrive for an art exhibit that 
Professor Hauser-Cram was organizing. In the 
course of the conversation, in what she calls, "a 
brave moment;" she mentioned that she would be 
interested in implementing such a program at BC 
where college students would work with children 
with disabilities in the arts. Smith arranged an 
internship for her the summer before her Junior 
year, in which she would write a proposal and 
develop the program. 

First semester Junior year, she worked with 
the Massachusetts office of Very Special Arts, as 
a coordinator. Second semester, the program 
began at The Condon School in South Boston. 
Fifteen students, plus herself started a new program 
where they, "integrated special needs classes and 
regular education classes in first, second and third 
grades, and a couple of times a week in arts 
classes - visual arts, and dance and movement." 
The BC students worked as aides to the "artists- 
in -residence", who are specifically trained to 
"facilitate the interactions between the two groups 
of kids because of the way the school is set up, the 
two groups of kids are physically separated from 
one another by the layout of the building. This 
was the first time some people had ever seen a 

child in a wheelchair," 
Mary Clancy said. 
Although the situa- 
tion can be intimidat- 
ing for both groups, 
she commented that 
the two groups be- 
came very close 
friends. "It was in- 
teresting to see how 
the arts can work as 
the medium for get- 
ting the two groups 
together." 

The summer 
before her Senior 
year, she had a longer 
internship in Wash- 
ington, D.C. "They 
wanted to set up dif- 
ferent models of the 
program; they wished 
to disseminate it to 
other schools, so I 
worked on that." 
Then, in the fall se- 
mester, she and ten 
other students began 
working at The Cam- 
pus School at B.C. 
dealing exclusively 
with disabled chil- 
dren, with one college 
student to every child. 
Visual arts were 
taught the fall semes- 
ter, music in the 
spring. Artists presenl 



an activity to the college students, who are then 
responsible to teach it and adjust it to the child's 
capabilities. This is especially important if they 
are visually impaired so that they can enjoy them- 
selves. This challenge is one of the most interest- 
ing and rewarding experiences she has had be- 
cause "it gives the children a chance to commu- 
nicate when they may not be able to normally." 

"Teople really make the effort 
to make a difference." 



She started playing the violin when she was 
five and although she does not wish to pursue it i 
professionally, she has no intention of giving it i 
up. She would like to continue playing in a i 
community orchestra or some sort of low-pres- 
sure situation. She says, "One of the great things • 
about BC was that they have all these opportunities 
for music people, but it's not high-powered, like : 
a music conservatory where you would be in strict i 
competition. It's really nice to be able to come : 
and relax and play for enjoyment." Mary Clancy 
speaks highly of the music program at BC. She 
appreciates the small classes and the personal 
attention from professors. "Being in Boston, the 
faculty's excellent, and you are able to have so 
many great music opportunities considering the 
size of the school. The music department is also 
great for people like myself, who don ' t want to go 
into performance, but want the opportunity to 
perform in college." 

One of the things she most admires about 
BC is that, "not only is there so much to offer, but I 
that people also take those opportunities. People 
really make the effort to make a difference." 
Mary Clancy is undoubtedly one of the many 
students at BC who takes the opportunities pre- 
sented to her, makes her own, and is very worthy 
of admiration herself.. Not only has she tutored at 
Nativity Prep, an all-boys Jesuit Junior High 
School in Roxbury for the past two years, but she 
has worked with Appalachia volunteers as well 
and is presently doing an internship with the 
Federation for Children with Special Needs. This 
is an advocacy program for parents with kids with 
special needs. Mary Clancy is helping them plan 
their national conference. 

Mary Clancy's extensive involvement has 
enabled her to, "Never feel alone." She feels that 
as a result of the various experiences she has had 
at BC, she has grown and become more of her I 
own person. She has become more indepen- 
dence, open-minded, complete and well-rounded. 
She is both excited and scared to graduate, a i 
common feeling among graduating seniors. But 
as she says, "whatever happens, happens." She 
would not change a thing about BC. except, 
possibly the weather! She comments on the 
college experience, "You get out of it what you 
put in." For Mary Clancy Haack. a dedicated 
investment of herself, will certainly add to a 
lifetime of memories of which to be proud. 

Gloria R. Backer, A&S '94 



254 




^Bryan Locke 



I ime is a valuable aspect of each and every 
allege student's life. To dedicate any portion of 
to anything other than studying and partying is 
n extremely difficult task. Bryan Locke is one 
lan who has overcome that obstacle. This 
conomics and sociology major from Holden, 
lassachusetts has dedicated more than just time 
i Boston College, he has given BC a part of his 
fe. 

Of all the volunteer organizations on 
ampus. the program that most visibly represents 
le BC community is the Student Admissions 
rogram. It is this program each and every 
:udent at Boston College has encountered, even 
efore they were an actual student. The Student 
vdmissions Program boasts a 550 person 
hembership. almost the largest on campus. Bryan 
ocke is the Head Coordinator of this prestigious 
rganization. He joined the staff his freshman 
ear as a greeter. basically hanging around in the 
admissions office greeting prospective BC 
tudents. "This program sounded like a good 
ling, it was a way to become involved in school 
ther than classes and homework." 

When he began, he had all hopes of 
ecoming an interviewer, but as we know, we 
rust all start at the bottom. After enjoying his 
•out as a tour guide. Bryan finally had his chance 
i he an interviewer, the position he had hoped to 



achieve. "When you 
interview, you deal 
one on one with a 
person you have never 
met, find out more 
about them and 
eventually leave 
knowing them 

better". It was last 
year when Bryan 
decided to apply for 
the Head Coordinator 
position. "Being a 
member of the SAP 
has been my most 
rewarding experience 
here at BC." Bryan 
can't explain how 
much he enjoys "to 
sit back and see all the 
accomplishments by 
the students at BC. 
Someone is always 
there to help out." 
Bryan is amazed at 
how much time and 
energy his fellow 
peers put into the 
program. He loves to 
see students talking 
with the prospective 
students and their 
parents, giving it their 
all to make them feel 
welcome. "Everyday 
I hear about how 
someone has stayed a 
little longer, or has 
offered to do an extra tour. I feel so proud to be 
associated with this organization." Besides his 
Head Coordinator position, Bryan is also a member 
of the Freshman Assistant Advisory Board. 

"The best part [about getting involved] is 
the people you meet from different countries and 
backgrounds and being able to learn and to 
appreciate the different approaches they take in 
life. It makes quite an experience." His 
experiences volunteering at BC have taught him 
a lot about himself and have helped him adapt to 
new surroundings. A lesson he will surely take 
with him when he leaves. 

"My most memorable experience here at 
BC will no doubt have to be our win over Notre 
Dame". Bryan feels that this historical game was 
a perfect contribution to help bring his senior year 
to an end. Bryan fondly cherishes the spirit found 
at BC. This is one fact he highlights on each and 
every tour he gives. Boston College is a family 
that sticks together through thick and thin. And 
according to Bryan Locke, Notre Dame was a 
perfect example of this. "I was hugging and 
cheering with BC kids I had never before seen in 
my life, but it didn't matter. We won and we are 
a family." That, he says, is a portrayal of our BC 
community. 

Bryan is undertaking the "job hunt thing" 
after graduation. He has loved each and every bit 



of the education he has received, but he personally 
feels one can only take so much of going to 
classes. Bryan really wants a job because "I like 
doing something and having a product result. 
That is part of the reason I am so involved with the 
Admissions Program." Eventually he hopes to 
go for his MBA, but not just yet. Financial 
services, or maybe even banking, are possibilities 
for his bright future. 

It is true Bryan Locke is leaving Boston 
College as a student, but he strongly claims, "I 
have too much of a close tie with BC to ever leave 
it." He anticipates becoming a strong member of 
the BC Alumni network he has heard so much 
about; he can't begin to think of ever losing all he 
has worked for to this point. "BC will always 
remain a part of my life. I want to keep giving 
back to Boston College all that it has given to me 
in these past four years." And he is positive that 
he will help tremendously, since he has taken full 
advantage of all the different opportunities offered 
to him throughout his college career. "BC has 
been a great experience and I feel I have done my 
best to become involved and take advantage of 
what they have to offer." 



Mr Z7ze best part [about getting 

involved] is the people you 

meet from different countries 

and backgrounds and being 

able to learn and appreciate 

the different approaches they 

take in life. It makes quite an 

experience." 



"As I leave BC, I take with me the Jesuit 
value of education- teaching for others." Bryan 
feels that each and every one of us should be 
thankful to be students here at BC and we should 
be conscientious of attempting to give something 
back in return. His method of retribution has been 
his masterful, dedicated volunteering; it is just 
one way "I can give back to BC". Boston College 
does its best through the Jesuit tradition to set you 
up for achieving your goals. "We have to realize 
that many others aren't as lucky as we have been. 
And we can owe it all to the Jesuit influence". 

BC has given him all that he can use towards 
achieving all his goals in life, and for that he will 
always remain faithful. BC will forever be a part 
of Bryan Locke. "There is always the opportunity 
to give back to someone who has greatly given to 
you." 

Tisa Dragos, A&S '95 



255 




(1/ hen Geoff Meek first visited Boston Col- 
lege with a high school friend on a whim, he knew 
that it was the place for him. So he made his way 
from Youngstown, Ohio to Chestnut Hill, Massa- 
chusetts in order to study in the Caroll School of 
Management. 

At the top of his class in CSOM with 
close to a 4.0 GPA, Geoff began to feel as if he 
were no longer being challenged academically. 
So he opted for change. In the middle of his 
sophomore year, Geoff transferred to the College 
of Arts & Sciences in order to be a Physics and 
Math major. But he soon after dropped the math 
major and became the only joint Physics and 
Philosophy major in his class. 

"Instead of wondering how to solve 
problems, I found myself asking why there are 
problems," Geoff says of the switch. He believes 
that physics and philosophy are "inherently con- 
nected." and many of his favorite scientists arc 
also his favorite philosophers, such as Aristotle, 
Newton mid Einstein. His education at Boston 
College has led him to classes in computer sci- 
ence and neurocognition and evoked interests in 
him, such as artificial intelligence, linguistics, 
and oilier specialized subjects like sociological 



evolutionary pat- 
terns and the 
metaphysical. 

Geoff s aca- 
demic realizations 
sparked his inter- 
est in the tendency 
for all things to 
keep changing. 
"Nothing stays 
static for too long. 
Motion is the only 
thing that sepa- 
rates the organic 
from the inor- 
ganic. I like to 
keep moving — 
keep things mov- 
ing. I feel com- 
pelled to do things 
that I feel are im- 
portant," Geoff 
said. 

His drive for 
positive progres- 
sion led him to 
become a Resident 
Assistant on the 
substance-free 
floor of CLX dur- 
ing his junior year. 
"Living with 
freshmen was a 
refreshing experi- 
ence because it 
brought back 
memories of my 
arrival and adjust- 
ment to Boston 
College," Geoff 
explained. "I en- 
joyed being in a position to help first year students 
and offer support for a healthy college experi- 
ence." 

His most unique "passive program" as 
an R. A. was posting condoms up on the inside of 
his dorm door. "I respect the codes of the Jesuit 
University at which I decided to attend, but I also 
realize that it takes some people longer to become 
aware of what is going on," Geoff says. "I wasn't 
going to foster a provincial view." Although 
Geoff never specifically told his residents that the 
condoms were there for the taking, they grasped 
the basic idea. 

Geoff s fight against the AIDS epidemic 
only started with this passive program, however. 
During his junior year, he founded and coordi- 
nated the first annual AIDS Benefit Dance in 
order to raise funds for "For the Love of Life," a 
wish granting foundation assisting those living 
with the HIV virus. His idea for the dance 
stemmed from a lecture given by Patrick Murphy, 
a man diagnosed with HIV and founder of "For 
the Love of Life." 

"The lecture brought me close to what 
was going on. I wanted at least one person to feel 
the way I felt after thai lecture." said Geoff. The 



dance was a tremendous success which raise 
$4,000 for the foundation and has been planne 
for 1994 with the goal of raising $8,000. "It wai 
a lot of hard work, but the rewards were weii 
worth it." 

Geoff s motivation to help others di(i 
not stop there. Besides coordinating the City Yea; 
serve-a-thon, a day of service in Boston, an<n 
working in a homeless shelter in Lawrence, Masi: 
sachusetts, Geoff journeyed to Ecuador over hi 
Christmas break during his junior year. Geol 
describes the trip which was sponsored by th 
University Chaplaincy as a "very sobering expe< 
rience." 

Geoff s pilgrimage to Ecuador taughl 
him how differently others live. "It was quite 
reality check for me, I realized that we're noi 
alone on this planet," he said. 



"I like to keep moving - keep 
things moving . I feel com- 
pelled to do things that I feel 
are important." 



"The main thing is that they were suci 
happy people, even though they live much differ 
ently than the way I live. Their concerns weren' 
with sexism and social concerns or anythim 
physical or monetary. They had a tremendoui 
amount of faith and taught me to have faith i 
myself." 

Geoff s active involvement in the BO 
community also caused him to find his way inti 
the office of The Heights, the independent studen 
weekly of BC. He gradually worked his way ui 
to the position of Associate Editor. Although hi 
was mainly the right-hand man of the Editor-int 
Chief, his responsibilities also included "main 
taining the computer network and morale of th! 
staff, as well as the final editing of the paper." 

From his experiences as an R.A. and hi 
position on The Heights he said, "I have learnet 
the value of working with other people. I haw 
learned that life is meaningless without interper 
sonal relationships, and this realization has giveo 
me the desire and motivation to help others." 

Since Geoff s service to the BC commit 
nity has taken up a lot of his time and energy, hli 
often prioritized it above academics because hli 
felt it was more important. "Grades are represen 
tations of a person's specific knowledge cc 
'things.' There is not much value in merell 
knowing 'things,' rather, the goal of education ii 
to understand them and, more importantly, relalil 
them to the people we live with." 

Michele LaMura, A&S '% 
Karen Scaii/wll, A&S '9< 



256 



1 1 hen people ask what I'm going to do after 
^lege and the navy, all I can say is - ENJOY 
L-E. What I try to do every day." Throughout 
ij four years at BC Jeff Pelletier has been in- 
rtved in a variety of activities and while his 
ysonal motto is to enjoy life, he has also brought 
ifny smiles to others while aiming for that goal. 
fff has been a strong student leader at Boston 
C'llege. working within the BC Bands program, 
m the Navy ROTC program. 

As a member of the BC Marching Band 
U four years Jeff has served as a Section leader 
I one year and then was selected to be a Drum 
Snjor. Jeff conducts the bands during all perfor- 
n'nees. including half-time and stand presenta- 
:ins. as well as organizing, motivating and con- 
juring the band during practice sessions. The 
bid has been involved with several parades in 
tl- community, and Jeff has been there for each. 
*o me music is my gift to people around me. If 
[ in play or conduct music and please my audi- 
s:e. it makes playing that much more enjoy- 
a e." His accomplishments have been such that 
ti advisor, Carole Hughes, the Assistant Dean of 
S ident Development, noted, "Jeff has been firmly 
: nmitted to the Boston College Bands Program 
5 ce his first day at Boston College. This has not 
a^ays been an easy commitment to keep, given 
tl academic schedule and ROTC responsibili- 
ty. Jeff approaches his commitments with a 




Jeff Pelletier 



strong intensity and desire. I think his contribu- 
tions to the program can be seen in the reactions 
of his peers. When Jeff speaks, the band listens. 
I suspect that this would be the case even if he 
were not the Drum Major." She also commented 
on Jeff's integrity, praising his sincerity, honesty 
and dedication to his commitments. Not only has 
Jeff been involved as a member of the marching 
band, the pep band and the concert band, he has 
also been a dedicated participant of the Navy 
ROTC. 

The son of an Army Lieutenant and 
Colonel, Jeff has always been familiar with the 
characteristics of the military. He was born at 
West Point and from there proceeded to move to 
Germany, Belgium, Kansas, back to Germany 
and finally to Virginia, where his family has 
resided for the last five years. Needless to say, 
Jeff has been surrounded by the military through- 
out his life; and although this may have been an 
influence in applying with the ROTC program, he 
elected to pursue a different path by deciding to 
enter the Navy ROTC program. He is a Midship- 
man First Class, a position gained by surpassing 
intense physical and academic standards. Some 
of his leadership roles include being a Platoon 
Leader and being responsible for instituting a new 
computer network for all members of the pro- 
gram. As a Junior officer, Jeff applied and was 
accepted into a program in which he worked on a 
submarine for a month. 
He began his journey in, 
Seattle Washington, and 
concluded in, Hawaii. 

Recently, Jeff was 
selected to attend 
Nuclear Power School, a 
very prestigious and dif- 
ficult branch of the 
NAVY, entailing further 
education which he plans 
to continue in Orlando 
FL. This acceptance 
came after a very rigor- 
ous interviewing process 
in Washington, D.C. 
which included a per- 
sonal interview with a 
prominent Admiral. The 
program entails fifteen 
months of schooling and 
then another several 
months spent studying in 
either Idaho or New 
York, where he will be 
training on a Nuclear 
prototype. Following 
this program, Jeff will 
undergo further school- 
ing at a submarine school 
in Connecticut. By the 
time Jeff concludes his 
education, he will be 
fully prepared to run a 
Nuclear Reactor. 

Obviously, only a 
very organized person 



Amy Lutz 



can manage to hold so many commitments, while 
also pursuing a computer science major. Father 
Mike McFarland, the Associate Professor and 
Chair of the Computer Science department com- 
ments, "Jeff is a delight to teach because he really 
wants to learn. He takes the initiative for his own 
learning and goes far beyond the required mini- 
mum. He leads by example, is hardworking, 
responsible and generous. He has an extraordi- 
nary number of demands on him, between ROTC, 
all the bands he is in, and his computer science 
major." Father McFarland is also the Faculty 
Advisor for the Marching Band, and states that, 
"Marching Band demands an exceptional com- 
mitment from its members, with many hours of 
practice and performances, evenings and week- 
ends, spent in searing heat and numbing cold. Jeff 
has risen to the top because of his loyalty, disci- 
pline, and spirit." A precarious balance of class 
work, band, and ROTC is something that Jeff 
managed and still had time to volunteer for BC by 
giving tours for in-coming students. He loves BC 
and is happy to tell others about it. He comments, 
"BC has brought out the best in me, and has really 
made me who I am. I can't imagine a better place 
to have spent the last four years." 



"'To me music is my gift to 

people around me. If I can 

play or conduct music and 

please my audience, it makes 

playing that much more 

enjoyable." 



All of these positions require a great deal 
of energy and enthusiasm, as well as strong dedi- 
cation to long hours of hard work. Jeff has always 
given himself completely to his work, and has 
become tremendously respected by the members 
of all the organizations he leads and participates 
in. He is considered a great friend by his room- 
mates whom he has known since his days as a 
freshman on Newton campus. His friends can 
attest to the lighter side of Jeff's personality; "He 
is very fun, energetic and does everything whole- 
heartedly. His dedication makes him a really 
good friend." says Kerri Younker. 

Jeff's dedication and selfless attitude 
have enabled him to share his wonderful talents 
with others. A favorite quote of his, "God gives 
each of us the inestimable gift of life on earth. 
Should each of us use that gift to do honor and 
loyalty to our country and shipmates, more can- 
not be expected," epitomizes his fervent desire to 
excel in all that he does. This is a quote which Jeff 
feels compelled to live by. However, he has not 
only given a little back to his country and ship- 
mates, but he has also been an avid contributor to 
the Boston College community. 

Johanna Roodenburg, A&S '96 



257 




^TaulJ. Troscia 



I n order to fully enjoy and understand life, 
one must venture out into the world and create a 
multitude of experiences from which to learn and 
grow. Often, risk and a sense of independence is 
necessary in order to achieve a more comprehen- 
sive view of the world around us. This is just 
what Paul Proscia, better known as, PJ, tries to 
accomplish on a daily basis. He can be compared 
to a chameleon, changing his hue all the time in 
order to fit the situation, or environment he is in; 
or simply in order to try something new and 
different. I lis friends describe him as, "The rarest 
of beings!" Perhaps that is why he has been able 
to extend himself in many directions, getting 
involved in the university and forming a number 
of relationships with various people on campus. 
PJ possesses many unique qualities which surface 
through his thoughts and actions. One of his most 
prevalent beliefs is that, "Life is much more than 
just books. II you don't experience life by be- 
coming involved, you miss out. This is an essential 
part of any one's education." 

As both DJ and general manager of 
W/IU '. Boston College's non-commercial radio 
station, PJ lias been able to inert and work with 



many different BC 
students. He has 
been involved 
with the university 
radio station since 
his freshman year. 
Initially the in- 
volvement 
stemmed from a 
love of music, and 
eventually grew to 
become an inte- 
gral facet of his life 
which he now tre- 
mendously en- 
joys. 

At first, PJ 
started out slowly, 
watching and 
learning through 
experience and in- 
teraction with oth- 
ers. As he grew 
more comfortable , 
the radio station 
became a place he 
frequented daily. 
He has acted as 
general manager 
for the past two 
years, and has had 
the opportunity to 
integrate his edu- 
cational and career 
goals with this ex- 
tracurricular ac- 
tivities. Working 
at the station, he 
was able to assist 
others by helping 
them with con- 
cerns or problems they may have encountered as 
part of their daily responsibilities to the broad- 
cast. He was responsible for the business aspect 
of WZBC. In order to ensure that the standards 
were met for the FCC, the Federal Communica- 
tions Commission, he was responsible for all 
legal aspects affecting the station. 

Branching out from the college scene, 
PJ entered the world of commercial radio when 
working as an intern for WDRE, a major alterna- 
tive rock station located in New York. This 
experience enabled him to meet people involved 
in the commercial radio industry, and experience 
the difference between college radio and com- 
mercial stations. He explained that he preferred 
the college radio atmosphere to the commercial 
one due to the fact that there is less stress involved 
when working with college radio. One is not 
forced to cater to others because of advertisement 
and business needs. As a marketing major in the 
School of Management, the experience was 
worthwhile. PJ is a strong believer in experience 
being the best educator. He explained, "I feel that 
the major part of college is not necessarily learn- 
ing things in a traditional way, but experiencing 



Amy Lutz 



things; whether that be in a classroom, social or 
extracurricular setting." 

His easy-going nature and friendly 
attitude have allowed him to develop friendships 
with many groups of students. PJ describes 
himself as someone who, "Laughs and smiles a 
lot;" he then adds, "If you don't, what is the 
point?" A goal of his is to make everyone feel 
comfortable. Unfortunately, too often people are 
made to feel awkward for their beliefs, practices, 
or forms of self expression. PJ brings a sense of 
open-mindedness to campus. He tries to accept 
all people; taking great care not to be judgmental. 
He comments, "I don't like to shutpeople out, that 
is why I like spending time with different people 
who are able to look at life from different per- 
spectives." However, given the amount of people 
he has befriended, he adds, "Not everyone knows 
the whole me. There are a lot of different sides to 
who I am." 



"Life is muck more than just 
books, lj you don't experience 
life by becoming involved, you 
miss out. 'Tkis is an essential 

part of any one's education." 



When asked what PJ will take with him 
when he graduates from Boston College, he re- 
plied, "Great memories and experiences." Those 
memories and experiences are things he hopes to 
"project into the future." By looking at life and 
people in a different way, he feels he is able to 
learn from uniqueness. Venturing into Boston is 
a favorite pastime, and he is fond of taking the 
time to stop and speak to homeless people he 
meets along the street. If their is a homeless 
individual who approaches him for money, PJ 
strikes up conversation requiring the person to tell 
a story before giving him or her money. Talking 
to people, listening to their stories and learning 
about their backgrounds provides insight into the 
world around us. He doesn't mind if the stories 
are fictional, as long as he has a chance to discover 
something about the individual. 

Paul Proscia is an inquisitive and unique 
person, broadening both his and the Boston Col- 
lege communities' horizons with his beliefs and 
philosophy. As a final word, he asked to add these 
remarks, "I would like to say good-bye and thank 
you to everyone that I have been friends with 
throughout my four years at Boston College. I 
have a lot of different memories with a lot of 
different people here, and I hope we do not forget 
these good times when we go off and start our 
different lives." 

PJ has touched the lives of many people 
on campus by giving of himself. His work at the 
radio station and the outside community reflects 
dedication and a fresh outlook on life. 

Maria Perunic, SOE '94 



25H 



'54 spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go 
own. the medicine go down.'" Sr. Maryalyce 
lilfeather S.N.D., Assistant Dean for Students. 
i the School of Education at Boston College, has 
l?en described by both colleagues and students, 
j. possessing a, "Caring warmth, a sense of 
amor, an optimistic outlook, and a delightful 
;rsonality." Professor Jean Moonev. describes 
". Marxahce as. "Mary Poppins in disguise." 
le explains. "1 can tell because she can create 
■ der out of chaos with a snap of her fingers." She 
energetic, responsive, and highly dedicated. 

Sr. Maryalyce served as a member of 
e teaching faculty for five years. During that 
une. she utilized an open door policy in her 
(Ice. in which students could simply walk in, 
lannounced, with any question or quandary 
e\ had. She explains that, since January of 
J93, when she assumed the position of Assistant 
ean. she has had to curb the freedom with which 
udents utilize the open door policy. This does 
3t mean that students are no longer able to 
jproach her: only that, due to her demanding 
rhedule. they must, at times, arrange an appoint- 
leni. Sr. Maryalyce expressed her philosophy 
■garding the type of relationship she strives to 
>ster among students. "I enjoy the fact that the 
udents are beginning to see this as their office; 
id that it is a place where they can come with 
ieir joys, as well as. their sorrows. I have many 
udents that will stop in just to tell me how well 
ley have done on an exam or a project. That, to 
ie. is what it is all about! The students know that 
iere is someone who can rejoice with them, and 
icn. also be there to listen to them when they are 
Ding through painful times." 

"'The students know that there 

is someone who can rejoice 

with them, and then, also 

be there to listen to idem 

when ffiey are going through 

painful times." 

Sr. Maryalyce will always make time 
Dr students, and still encourages and welcomes 
isits by all. Many students approach her for 
uidance. while others simply come to share 
ccomplishments. Regardless of the motive, she 
dishes each visit. She respects and serves the 
tudents in the School of Education with such 
ervor. that, due to her outstanding reputation, 
ven students from other schools have been known 
approach her for assistance. She remarks, "My 
ole is to be someone to empower the students, to 
lelp them identify their own gifts, and to help 
hem build upon their unique talents, so that they 
n turn, become the best individuals they can 
tecome." 

Sr. Maryalyce relies on her students to 
lefine her role in the School of Education. They 
ire the main focus of attention, and their ideas 



and input are crucial to the total development of 
her position. Due to the numerous tasks that Sr. 
Maryalyce performs on a daily basis, it is almost 
impossible to put into words what her job entails. 
However, she describes her position as, "one of 
a shepherdess, whose role is to be attentive to the 
sheep, and to be their to guide and encourage 
them. Another aspect of the shepherding, is that 
you get to know the sheep, always respecting 
those who choose not to be known, and encourag- 
ing those who want to share." Through her 
involvement with the students she has come to 
know them on an individual basis, and she feels 
privileged to walk with them in both their educa- 
tional and their personal journeys, always offer- 
ing creative and realistic options to help them 
make choices. 

Sr. Maryalyce describes education and 
learning as "an investment of yourself." She 
quotes a favorite line from scripture, " 'Gifts you 
have received, give as a gift,' " stating that this 
belief is intrinsic to the relationships that she has 
developed with both colleagues and students. A 
goal of hers is to, "stress the positive rather than 
the negative." She graciously expressed her thanks 
for the support and help she has received from the 
faculty. She describes the generosity they have 
extended, as contributing to her relationship with 
students, and enabling 
her to return this gift 
to them. This sharing 
process becomes a 
cyclical effect be- 
tween administrators, 
faculty and students. 
Sr. Maryalyce de- 
scribes the last step of 
the cyclical effect, as 
one which brings the 
gifts given at Boston 
College, to the out- 
side community. 
"The students will 
hopefully empower 
those that they are 
working with; be it in 
the classroom or in a 
service orientation." 

When asked 
what she enjoyed 
most about her posi- 
tion, Sr. Maryalyce 
enthusiastically re- 
plied, "Working with 
the students! Defi- 
nitely working with 
the students." One 
thing Sr. Maryalyce 
tries to hold onto is 
heropen-mindedness. 
She gives herself, 
"Daily reminders to 
listen, be non-judge- 
mental, and put forth 
her best." She hopes 
that students can take 
that attitude with them 



in all of their endeavors. Along with this mes- 
sage, the graduating seniors receive a poem by 
Rogene N. Penny, that Sister Maryalyce feels, 
exemplifies her philosophy of teaching. She 
added that the word child could be substituted 
with the word person. It is her hope that the 
students she so dearly loves, and respects, would 
take these words and apply them to everything 
that they end up doing in life. 
If I could... 

I would teach each child to be positive, 
to smile, to love, and be loved. 

I would teach each child to take time to 
observe some miracle of nature - the song of a 
bird, the beauty of a snowflake, the orange glow 
of a winter sunset. 

I would teach each one to be kind to all 
living creatures, and to crowd out of their lives 
feelings of guilt, misunderstanding and lack of 
compassion. 

I would teach each child that it is O. K. to 
show theirfeelings by laughing, crying, or touch- 
ing someone they care about. 

Every day 1 would have each child feel 
special and through my actions, each one would 
know how much I REALLY CARE. 

Maria Perunic, SOE '94 




Sister Maryalyce 
(jilfeatlier 



259 




_____ 



Trof. Taul ^Breines 



1 rofessor Breines teaches Modern European 
Intellectual History - the 19th and 20th century 
history of ideas. He sees his role in the History 
department as trying to make a connection be- 
tween material that he's looking at in history and 
how it is related to his life and the lives of his 
students. He wants students to try to think about 
history as entwining people in the relationship 
between past documents and present experiences 
of their own. 

He finds his job "stimulating, exciting, 
challenging, and frustrating," all at the same time. 
As a faculty member at Boston College for the 
past 1 8 years, Professor Breines has met a group 



of students who tend to be discontent 
with society's ideas of conformity as 
well as with flaws they see at Boston 
College and the nation as a whole. He 
meets, "agitated, engaged, high energy 
students" who want to see changes made. 
Pofessor Breines said that he, "tends to 
go a little against the grain — politically, 
[and] religiously," and he does not see 
Boston College as being, "completely 
homogenized, " as some see it. He 
believes that it is a "credit to Boston 
College to have a faculty that is so intel- 
lectually diverse." 

He said that it is very different 
teaching the core classes, as opposed to 
the elective classes for history majors. 
As a result of the unique nature of each, 
it is difficult to compare the two. He 
considers both classes to have challenging as- 
pects, but what he ultimately likes best are the 
smaller electives, where the students have more 
opportunities to play a role in what goes on. "The 
experience of teaching the core classes, which 
also have discussion sections and lectures, is a 
different challenge." 

Professor Breines said he wanted to teach 
because he likes to tell and hear stories. "Many 
historians don't think what they are doing is 
telling stories, but I think that in a certain respect 
teaching is a story telling profession, and a story 
hearing profession." He said that teaching is 
immensely interactive, and in this social pro- 



gression, his students are always invited to make 
comments. He has confidence in his students to 
make sense of what he is saying and relate it to i 
their own lives, but he does not think that there is 
one specific message that students must get out of 
his class. 

He has found that because of things that.i 
have gone on in American culture within recent n 
years, and as a result of the roles of his work andi 
thinking, he has been interested in a relatively 
new phenomenon known as Post-Modernism or r 
Post-Stucturalism. He thinks that what makes it i 
interesting, in relation to teaching, is that it is not' 
unfamiliar to college students today, who are> 
searching to find themselves and who feel un- 
settled. He therefore feels a connection. Reading g 
literature and historical material from the stand- 
point of that shared experience about developing" 
identity is very interesting. He is presently writ- • 
ing about this Post-Modernist phenomenon. 

Professor Breines has many interests s 
outside of the university, but he basically believes s 
that all of his activities are one and continuous i 
with teaching. 

He said that it is because of the people he e 
has met at Boston College that the feels a "very-, 
deep loyalty to the insitution." Although he has i 
had to face some oppostition with his alleged^ 
political views, he still feels a profound connec- 
tion at BC. He feels very much at home here duec 
to the people he has met and the support andil 
confidence of his peers. 

Cathleen Coyle, A&S '97' 



IV hen asked about her most memorable or her 
best experience at Boston College, Dr. Malek 
responds, "All of my experiences have been 
positive at BC. I guess that's why I'm still here!" 
Dr. Cathy Malek has been a professor at Boston 
College for eleven years. She currently works in 
the Adult Health Department of the School of 
Nursing. As part of her responsibilities in this 
department, she works at the undergraduate level 
teaching Adult Health for the full school year. 
During the first semester of school she is busy 
coordinating Synthesis, a clinical course for se- 




niors in the School of Nursing. Dr. Malek intro- 
duced this program to Boston College three years 
ago and continues to run it today. During the 
second semester, in addition to guiding this pro- 
gram, she teaches Qualitative Research Methods, 
a course given at the doctorate level. This will be 
her first time teaching at the doctorate level and 
she anxiously awaits the experience. "This will 
be a big challenge. I will have to take on a 
different focus and will be teaching students I've 
never seen before." 

In addition to teaching, Dr. Malek is 
participating in two studies on pain 
management. Her first research project 
entails looking at nurses at nearby hos- 
pitals, and focusing on their decision- 
making process in regards to how to deal 
with patients' pain management. Dr. 
Malek's second study explores the rela- 
tionship between patients experiencing 
severe pain and how Christmas, as a 
holy day and holiday, affects this pain. 
This study which she terms her 
"Christmas project" is entering its sec- 
ond year. 

Before coming to Boston Col- 
lege Dr. Malek had various experiences 
both in teaching and nursing. Upon 
moving to Massachusetts from Wis- 
consin in 1973, she began nursing at the 
Newton Wellesley Hospital and lateral 
the New England Baptist Hospital. 



While working, she was attended the graduate 
program at Boston College where she receivedil 
her Masters of Science. Deciding to further hen 
education, Dr. Malek continued to attend Boston n 
College where she received her Ph.D. in Curricu-i 
lum Instruction and Administration. 

Having finished her own education, Dr.' 
Malek decided to teach others. She became ai 
professor at the New England Baptist Hospital i 
School of Nursing where she had formerly worked -l 
as a nurse. She also spent some time teaching in 
the nursing department of LaSalle Junior College 
located in Newton, Massachusetts before coming 
a professor at Boston College. 

When asked about her future plans, Dr.i 
Malek responds that she plans to stay at Boston » 
College until she retires. "I like B.C. Iseeitasa.i 
good fit for me." This must be true, for Dr. Malek k 
has chosen to spend a significant part of her life inn 
the Boston College community both as a studentil 
and professor. 

As a professor in the School of Nursing, I 
Dr. Cathy Malek strives to be a "supportive* 
teacher," a "professional role model," and ai 
"personal friend" to her students. She hopes that 
her students take the best of what she has and uses i 
this to formulate their own nursing style. By> 
hearing the comments of her students one can tell 
that she achieves these goals. Dr. Cathy Malek is - 
certainly a person that any student might wish to 
emulate. 

Renee Riethmiller, SOE '93 



260 



|*i s director of the PULSE program. David 
vIcMenamin has touched many lives. This year 
ilone the PULSE program will bring 270 students 
Into new and profound relationships with the 
jeediest people of our city. Professor McMenamin 
las been a true leader, expanding the number of 
•lasses offered in the program, and diversifying 
he placements available to students. 

Each year the PULSE program intro- 
luces philosophy and theology to hundreds of 
Itudents in a unique way. By providing students 
\ ith an opportunity to develop relationships with 
ome ot the neediest people in Boston, it gives 
philosophy and theology a solid foundation upon 
\ hich to build. Director Dave McMenamin be- 
ie\es that it is this connection that, "shows stu- 
lents that philosophy and theology have real 
oncrete bearing on how they live their lives. It 
makes students aware that they are part of a larger 
ommunity with responsibilities." 

It was his own sense of responsibility 
•hat led him to Boston College. At Villanova, he 
>. as co-founder of the Center for Peace and Jus- 
ice Education. Through the Center he taught 
philosophy and led retreats: realizing that he had 
certain talents in this area he decided to pursue his 
3 h.D. so that he could continue such work. "1 
believe that life in general, and all the talents we 
iave. are gifts. Because they are gifts, we are 
.ailed upon to pass them on." 

As director. Professor McMenamin has 
ouched many lives through indirect and direct 



means. Hundreds of this year's gradu- 
ating class have been affected by their 
experience in the program. He is re- 
sponsible for the operation and 
oganization of a large group of students 
who. in addition to taking a PULSE 
course, volunteer in over 50 social ser- 
vice agencies for ten to twelve hours 
each week. For the student who has 
striven to find meaning in his/her work 
with the disadvantaged of our city, citi- 
zenship will take on a new importance 
through the individuation of the term 
"oppressed" that makes compassion for 
other people authentic. 

He also has served as mentor 
for the PULSE council, which facilitates 
the relationship between the students 
volunteering, and the placement itself. 
He guides and supports the 16 council members 
in their roles as liasons to the 270 PULSE stu- 
dents. He is always available to help the council 
in their work, and provides a unique philosophi- 
cal perspective towards life and service from 
which the council grows and develops. It is 
reported by these students that when he gets into 
a groove during a discussion, he can be heard, 
"singing it!" 

For Professor McMenamin, "The role 
of teacher, and interaction with the council was a 
key factor in my interest in the job." As a 
professor, he has been described as "one of the 




'Troj. T)amd McMemanin 



best." He is able to provide his students with a 
clarity and insight of the subject and material that 
few professors can. In addition, he makes a 
stronger personal commitment to his students 
because Pulse is, in and of itself, that type of 
learning environment. 

His continued devotion to developing 
his gifts in both the private and public realms has 
made him a friend and inspiration for many 
graduating seniors as they become true members 
of a larger community . He has been a model of the 
Boston College motto, "ever to excel." 

Cormac Cullen, A&S '94 



h. nthusiastic. That is the best word to describe 
3 rofessor Bonnie Rudner. There is an energy 
lbout her that radiates and is contagious. A 
acuity member in the English department, Pro- 
"essor Rudner has been teaching at BC for the past 
welve years. 

Professor Rudner always knew she 
.vould choose teaching as a career path. Her 
"ather was an elementary school teacher for 43 
years and she credits him as her primary role 
model "simply because he loved what he did." 
Until she decided to become an English major in 
ollege, she wasn't quite sure what she would 
teach but she says: "I really never thought about 
doing anything other than teaching." 

Professor Rudner currently teaches 
Freshman English. Children's Literature, and 
Prose Writing. She doesn't really have a favorite 
'class because they are all so different. "I love the 
'prose writing because they are seniors and they 
probably haven't had an intimate writing class 
here. We all become a very close knit group of 1 5 
students and I love to get to know my students on 
that level. I love the children's Literature because 
the material is so much fun. I love the Freshman 
class because they are Freshman and they are so 
"fresh" and excited. If I had to give up any of them 
I don't know what I would do." 

The most challenging part of teaching is 
two-fold for Professor Rudner. She feels it is 
essential to make her classes meaningful for the 
students. "I want them to want to be in class." It's 



not just the GPA or the credits that motivate the 
students. "I want to give them a real intellectual 
reason to come to class and to work hard." For 
herself, the most challenging part of teaching is 
the transition between one group of students to 
another. Each semester or each year Professor 
Rudner must say good-bye to a group she is 
attached to and then "gear up" for a new group of 
students. Although extremely important, it be- 
comes difficult to keep up a high level of enthu- 
siasm. However, she does accomplish this quite 
well. 

In trying to register for one of 
Professor Rudner' s classes on U-DIAL, 
the familiar "This class is CLOSED" 
will probably be heard. Why do her 
classes close so fast? She ventures a few 
guesses. "I am always excited about the 
material, and I am willing to be flexible 
with the material. It's that sense of 
generating enthusiasm that's conta- 
gious." 

Over the twelve years she's 
been teaching at BC, she has seen many 
changes in the BC community. "The 
student body is much more diverse but at 
the same time, BC feels much bigger. 
"Looking around at today's BC campus. 
one can see that the growing trend of 
expansion is not about to end anytime 
soon. For a professor who values the 
intimacy of classes, bigger may not al- 



ways mean better. Although a large university, 
the many small sized classes offered allow pro- 
fessors such as Bonnie Rudner to maintain excep- 
tional standards. 

One thing is definite about Professor 
Rudner: teaching is very much a part of her life. 
In ten or twenty years, she cannot imagine herself 
nor teaching. Professor Rudner says: "Even if I 
won Megabucks, I would still teach... I can't 
imagine giving up my relationship with my stu- 
dents and teaching the things that I love." 

-Amie Joyce, A&S '94 




261 



When we entered as freshmen we were anxious of 
what lay ahead of us, and eager to begin this new journey. 
Together, we suffered through finals and papers, but 
always found time to have fun. During this time we 
formed friendships that will last a lifetime. Slowly but 
surely, the people and experiences we encountered have 
become an integral part of each of us and have shaped us 
into who we are today, just as we each in turn have 
touched others. As we leave as alumni, we hopefully are 
wiser, more aware of the world around us, and more sure 
of ourselves in order that we can make a difference and 
find success each in our own way as we become a part of 
this world. 



^MzJime dfor ^Jt/J \_JJ2mag 




94 



Be courageous 

and be brave, 

and in my heart 

you f ll always stay 

forever young. 

-Rod Stewart 






Class of 1994 265 





The 

better 

part of one's 

life consists 

of his 
friendships. 

- Abraham Lincoln 





Class of 1994 267 



94 





268 





A 




1 






^^^V ^^1 * M 





Seniors 





I'd rather 

laugh with the 

sinners than 

cry with the 

saints.... the 

sinners are 

much more fun. 

- Billy Joel 







^* M ^hH ^K^^r Bjbr ^YAJfir 


"j -| 3 1 


1 

1 




r fe*r 


hi' ' 








Pf^ 


* 

k 








T A 





Class of 1994 269 



94 



Our memories 
of yesterday 

will last a 

lifetime. We f ll 

take the best, 

forget the rest, 

and someday 

we'll find, 
these are the 
best of times! 

- Styx 




. • 



vj&** 



1 ^ 




270 



Seniors 




if »: 



Class of 1994 271 



Lisa M. Abair 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Robert P. Abany 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Kimberlee K. Abe 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Paola V. Abello 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Chris P. Abidian 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Majd A. Aburabia 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Christopher L. 
Accardo 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Nicole F. Ache 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Matthew V. Adam 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Catherine C. Adams 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




A*A 



Pamela L. Adams 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



William J. Adams 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Evelyne Odile Adler 

Arts & Sciences 
English 
Pre -Law 



Elizabeth Aguiar 

School of Management 
Accounting 



David J. Ahr 

School of Management 
Finance 




Richard L. Alcock 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Ivan K. Alexander 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Samantha H. 
Allen-Storey 

Arts & Sciences 
English / Philosophy 



f 



■ 

Christopher J. Allen Susan J. Allspaw 




School of Management 

Accounting 



Ails & Sciences 
English 



272 Seniors 




Michelle L. Almeida 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Virgilio Alon, Jr 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




harlotte A. Altmeyer 

School of Nursing 
Nursina 



Anthony Amador 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




John J. Amaral 


Jann Amato 


Amy E. Ambarik 


Lucia F. Ambrosino 


Domenica M. 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Amendolara 


Information Systems 


History 


Psychology 


Human Development 


School of Management 


Marketing 




Pre-Law 




Accounting 




Felix Amerasinghe 

School of Management 

Finance 

Sociology 



Arlene L. Amo 

School of Management 
Computer Science 



Carmelo S. Amoddio 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Information Systems 



April R. Anderson 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Brian E. Anderson 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Class of 1994 273 




Kathleen M. Andersour 

School of Management 

Finance 

Communication 



Todd S. Anderson 

School of Management 
Marketing 
Philosophy 




iuren E. Angelo 


Thomas C. Angelone 


Kerri D. Anglin 


Sarah B. Ankner 


Scott T. Annicelli 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


English 


English 


Accounting 


History 


Finance 
Economics 




Abraham J. Appert 

School of Management 
Finance 

Marketing 



Peter M. Arcuri 

Arls & Sciences 
English 



Christine P. Arrascada 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Jaime Arrastia 

School of Management 
Finance 



Eduardo J. Arriola 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



274 Seniors 



I 




Michelle M. Ascrizzi 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Patricia M. Asimacos 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Mark A. Atchity 

School of Management 
Finance 



Cynthia Athan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Angela L. Atkinson 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Spanish 




Karen M. Atkinson 

School of Nursing 
Nursina 



David K. 
Atwereboanda 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology / Pre-Law 



Derric T. Au 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Derek R. Auclair 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Regan E. Avery 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 




Carmen L. Ayerve 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Spanish 




Christian Aylett 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Class of 1994 275 



Leslie C. Aylsworth Jennifer B. Azzara Michael R. Azzolino 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences School of Management 

Psychology Psychology Finance 




Brian E. Bagenstose 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Paul J. Baird 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Tiffany A. Back 

Arts & Sciences 
Music 




Gloria R. Backer 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Dane E. Baird 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




David A. Bairstow 

School of Management 
Finance 




Clyde G. Baker 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Stephen S. Baldante 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Anthony G. Baldwin 

School of Management 
Finance 



Andrew O. Bales 

Arts & Sciences 
Economies 



Jeremy R. Ball 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



276 Seniors 



Naveen Ballem 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Pre-Med 



Michael T. Ballentine 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Thomas C. Balshi 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Carol S. Baltimore 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Maribeth Bambino 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Joseph M. Barbieri 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 



Vanessa Barges 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Julie Barker 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Ann E. Barley 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Corinne F. Barmore 

School of Education 
Human Development 




Laura M. Barnabei 

Arts & Sciences 

English 



Jorie A. Barnett 

School of Management 
Finance 



Loring C. Barnett 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Thomas F. Barrett 

School of Management 
Finance 



William S. Barrett 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Michael E. Barry 

Arts & Sciences 

English 



Thomas J. Barry 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Christina M. Baruh 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 



Anne-Elizabeth 
Baseggio 

Arts & Sciences 
Spanish 



Sarah J. Bastille 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Class of 1994 277 



Sweet 
Revenge! 





278 



Seniors 




Class of 1994 279 



94 



BC... 

the fabric of 
our lives! 




280 



Seniors 





Class of 1994 281 



Steven Bater 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Priya Batra 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Sociology 



Kim A. Battaini 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Daniel G. Baumstark 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Claudette Bautista 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Jennifer M. Bay 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Barbara A. Beakey 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Garth E. Beall 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Spanish 



Renee M. Beare 

School of Management 
General Management 




Mark H. Beary 

Arts & Sciences 
Germanic Studies 




Matthew C. Beary 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Jason W. Beatty 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



282 Seniors 




writer- 




Guillaume N. 
Beaurpere 

Arts & Sciences 
French 




Kathryn A. Bedlow 

School of Management 

Computer Science 
Information Systems 



Jacinta C. Beehner 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Todd L. Beekley 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Lyn-Marie Behmke 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



George J. Behringer 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Adam S. Beighley 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Robert W. Bell 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Andres C. Benach 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Michael N. Benard 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 
Psychology 



Carol V. Bender 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 



Heather H. Benedict 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Class of 1994 283 



Alan M. Bengzon 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jose L. Benitez 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 
Political Science 



Cherie E. Benoit 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Lynne M. Berardi 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Heidi Bergmeyer 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Melissa A. Berish 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Information Systems 



Desiree R. Bernardez Christopher J. Berry 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics Communication 



Dana M. Berthold 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Anthony P. Bertoldo 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 




Olga G. Berwid 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Lydia R. Betancourt 

School of Education 
Elementary / Moderate 
Special Needs / Spanish 



Kim M. Bible 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Heather K. Bickle 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Amy Biggieri 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Brenda A. Biggins 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Katna J. Bindra 

Ails & Sciences 
Political Science 



Courtney Ann Bintner Keith D. Birkmaier 

School of Education School of Management 

Elementary Education Finance 

Human Development Operations & Slral. Mgmt. 



Kathryn P. Bishop 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 
Political Science 



284 Seniors 



Jeffrey J. Bisio 

School of Management 

Finance 

Computer Science 



Kimberly S. Bisset 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Layla L. Bitar 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Kim A. Bittenbinder 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




John D. Blaisdell 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kevin D. Bloom 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Matthew D. Bober 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Mark W. Bodie 

School of Management 
Finance 



Peter F. Black 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Delia P. Blackler 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Cynthia A. Blais 

School of Management 
Marketing 




John A. Bodt 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Class of 1994 285 



Ann E. Boehler 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Christopher M. 
Bogdanski 

Arts & Sciences 
Classics 



Laura J. Boland 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Julie C. Bolles 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Christine M. Bolton 

School of Education 

Elementary / Moderate 

Special Needs / Human Dev. 




David W. Bonito 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Melissa L. Bonk 

School of Education 

Elementary / Moderate 

Special Needs / Philosophy 



Amy D. Bonnici 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Jennifer Bono 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Michael D. Bonpin 

School of Management 

Finance / English 
General Management 




Danielle A. Bornstein 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 




Gregory T. Boron 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



286 Seniors 




Dina Marie Bosco 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Operations & Strat. Mgmt. 



Nicole M. Boudreau 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Kelly A. Bourke 

School of Education 

Elementary / Moderate 

Special Nds. / Child in Soc. 



Colleen Bouzan 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Malia L. Borsella 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 




Joseph T. Borthwick 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Donna M. Boyajian 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Patricia J. Boyce 

Evening College 
Biology 



Nicole D. Boyer 

School of Education 

Elementary / Moderate 

Special Nds. / Child in Soc. 



Christopher Boyle 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



David M. Brabeck 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Psychology 



Sarah J. Bradshaw 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Class of 1994 287 



94 






2KK 



Seniors 



The imagination 

is really the only 

way we have of 

handling the 

world. 

- William Lynch 




Class of 1994 289 



94 



Life 

is 

nothing 

without 

friendship! 

- Cicero 






Class of 1994 291 




Daniel J. Bransfield 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Melinda Jo Bravo 

School of Management 
Finance 



Colleen M. Breen 

Arts & Sciences 

French 

Psychology 



Nathan A. Breen 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Michael J. Brand 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



John W. Brandes 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Kimberly A. Brennan 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Susan E. Brennan 


Michelle A. Bricca 


David E. Brick 


Heather M. Bridges 


Lori A. Brightman 


School of Nursing 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Nursing 


Accounting 


Political Science 


Accounting 


Biology 


292 Seniors 












Suzanne M. Brink 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Ann M. Brissette 

School of Management 
Marketing 
Economics 



Julene A. Britt 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communication 



Holly V. Broadbent 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Karen L. Brogan 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Amy S. Brooks 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Susan M. Broughton 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 
Philosophy 



Jeanne L. Broussard 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Daniel W. Brown 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



David J. Brown 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Gregory Brown 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Karen E. Brown 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Katherine E. Brown 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 

Math & Computer Science 



Kerry-Ann A. Brown 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Bridget M. Bruen 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Tricia M. Brundage 

School of Nursing 

Nursins 



Stephanie L. Brunet 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 



Jessica L. Bryar 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Bryan Alan Buckley 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Christine S. Buckley 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Class of 1994 293 




Bret Budenbender 

School of Management 
Finance 



Phuong Bui 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Pauline M. Burke 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Sean B. Burke 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Christopher J. Burns 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Pre-Med 




John D. Burns 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Michael L. Burns 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Thomas M. Burns 

Ails & Sciences 
Psychology 



Amie C. Burtman 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



John Arthur R. 
Bustria 

School of Management 
Accounting 



294 Seniors 



Susan A. Butare 

School of Management 
General Management 



James P. Butler 

School of Management 
Finance 



Kimberley A. Butler 

Arts & Sciences 
Italian 



Ryan K. Byrne 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Jason L. C'Miel 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 
Communication 



Mark E. Cachia 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




fertJi 



Jennifer L. Cafero Christine A. Caldarella Charles D. Caliri John J. Callahan, Jr. 

School of Management Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences School of Management 

Accounting English Biology Marketing 




Alejandro M. 
Cambeses 

School of Management 
Finance / Economics 




Rosemarie E. Came 

Arts & Sciences 
Geology 




Class of 1994 295 



Still 

crazy 

after all 

these 

years. 

- Paul Simon 








Seniors 





■ ^3 


WH 




HI* ' * II 


%&&. 




- 


WK 




BL ^St 




-*»*. ji 


fa * H^^»i 

JtLl 


V 1 





Class of 1994 297 



You can 

leave 

your hat 

on! 

- Joe Cocker 




Class of 1994 299 




Sharon A. Campbell 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Peter D. Campion 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Paul J. Canalori 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kristen A. Canavan 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 



Lisa Cammuso 

Arts & Sciences 
Spanish 



Darlene Campbell 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Areti P. Canellos 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

History 



■^ 




.^ 1mmm\M 


- 




rm mm 1 


H 




F ¥ 





MrijkM 




Clarence Ellis Cannon Jennifer A. Cantore James V. Capiola Michael J. Capolino Tony Caporizzo 



School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Human Development 


Sociology 


Economics 


English 


Marketing / Finance 
General Management 


$00 Seniors 












Paula J. Capri 

School of Management 
Finance 



Bethany L. Caracuzzo 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Renee M. Cardona 

Evening College 
Business 




Sean F. Carey 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Philosophy 



Christopher Carleo 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 
Psychology 




1 ■ ri 




Jennifer Carlucci 

School of Management 
Finance 



Peter E. Carmichael Michelle C. Carmody 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics History 



Clare M. Carney 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Sociology 



Kathleen K. Carney 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Tara A. Carney 

School of Management 
Accounting 



James M. Carolan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



fM 

Lorinda A. Carosella 

Arts & Sciences 
Physics 



Gina C. Carr 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Melissa A. Carr 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Debra L. Carrasquillo Edward J. Carroll 

Arts & Sciences School of Management 

Sociology Marketing 



imon S. Cartelli 


John E. Carter 


Shelby L. Carter 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Political Science 


Spanish 


English 

Class of 1994 301 




Gerard A. Caruso 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Information Systems 



Emanuel F. 
Casamassima 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Brendan Cashman 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Philosophy 



Francis J. Cassidy 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Craig R. Castiglia 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Clarissa A. Castillo 

School of Management 

Marketing 
Human Resource Mgmt. 



Kristen A. Castleberry 

School of Management 

Human Resource 

Management 



Craig C. Caudill 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Theresa A. Cassidy 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 




John J. Caulway 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Robert L. Cavallo 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Sharon IM. Cavanagh 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



M)2 Seniors 




William S. Chadwick 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Kelli A. Chamberlain 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Bonney Chan 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Christine Y. Chan 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Christian M. Celic 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Christie B. Cerrato 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Human Development 




Florence W. Chan 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Steven Chan 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Michael J. 
Chandrankunnel 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Andrew H. Chang 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Leslie C. Chang 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Psychology / Child in Society 



Todd A. Chapman 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Class of 1994 303 



94 





^fl Hk V 


■ I 








- v. ^^1 


A 

kiss 



is just 

a kiss, is 

just a kiss, 

is just a 

kiss! 




Class of 1994 305 



Erik Charlton 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Adam P. Chase 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Emily A. Chase 


Alfonso E. Chavez 


Benjamin C. Chen 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Psychology 


Economics 


Finance 


Philosophy 


Philosophy 







Judy Wai Che Chen 


Tanya Cherkerzian 


Nancy J. Chevry 


Ryan C. Chimenti 


Elaine Chin 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Education 


Psychology 


Psychology 


Psychology 


Finance 


Human Development 


Sociology 








Psychology 




Kwan Lynne Ching 


Thomas A. Chiodo 


Sandra E. Chisholm 


Priya S. Chitre 


Jean Choe 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Marketing 


Biology 


English 


Psychology 


Psychology 




Gregorio J. Chong-Hon Maria Christakis Rebecca Yeeping Chui 

School of Management School of Management Evening College 

Accounting Finance Accounting 

I liiman Resource Mgmt. 



Jason S. Chung 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Kimberly 
Church-Burrows 

School of Education 
Elementary / Child in SocietS 



N)f) Seniors 











Christopher M. Chute 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

l 


Courtney Ciampi 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 




Concetta Cicolini 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Maria C. Cid 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 





Karin E. Cihak 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Julie A. Cimpko 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 



Jose R. Cinco 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Lisa M. Cinege 

Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 
Computer Science 



Nicole E. Ciszak 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Michael F. Civille 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Stephen G. Claps 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Kathleen C. Clark 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



James F. Clarke 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Mary A. Clavin 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Class of 1994 307 



Karin M. Cleary 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Michael J. Clemente 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Paul J. Clemente 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Jennifer M. Clemons 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Courtney J. Clifford 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Robert R. Cohen 

Arls & Sciences 
Chemislry 



Jay ML Colbath 

Ails & Sciences 
English 



Stephen P. Colbert 

School of Management 
Finance 

Mathematics 



Amanada H. Cole 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Melissa A. Coleridge 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



30K Seniors 





^fch4 



k 





Cristiano V. Colitti 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



David B. Colleran 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Christopher J. Collins 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Lisette Colon 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Spanish 



Lissette M. Colon 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Philosophy 




Paul A. Colone 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Jon D. Colvin 

School of Management 
Accounting 



John J. Commisso 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Aimie L. Compisi 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Kara L. Concannon 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Primitivo Concepcion 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



William C. Connell 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



David M. Connolly 

Evening College 
Business Administration 



Diane M. Connolly 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Michele J. Connolly 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 




Molly A. Connor 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math & Computer Science 



Debora A. Connors 

Evening College 
Psychology 



Susanne L. Connors 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



John L. Conos 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Jonathan M. Conti 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Class of 1994 309 



Ann E. Conway 


Timothy Cooke 


Patricia Corcoran 


Jacqueline Cortes 


Patrick A. Cosentino 


School of Education 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


School of Management 


Elementary / Child in Society 


Finance 


English 


Nursing 


Finance 


Human Development 




French 




Economics 




Michael C. Cosgrove Stephen P. Costantino 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

English English 

Philosophy 



Steven M. Cote 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Yolanda M. Courtney 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



E. Charles Covahey 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 





Barbara Covino 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math & Computer Science 




Cathleen M. Coyle 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 
Communication 



310 Seniors 




The new Mini Coach of Boston? 



I. ' 







Elizabeth A. Coyle 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 




John F. Coyle 

School of Management 
Finance 




Timothy J. Coyle 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jennifer L. Crawford 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Gerald M. Crean 

School of Management 
Economics 



Kevin M. Creedon 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Susan C. Crimmins 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Carolyn A. Cronin 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Christine Cronin 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Kathryn E. Cronin 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Michael J. Cronin 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Shannon B. Crotty 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Class of 1994 311 



94 



We're not here for 

a long time; 

we're here for a 

good time! 




m 





Class of 1994 313 




Ell 

it* 




Geoffrey S. Crouse 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Suzanne E. Crowley 

School of Management 
Finance 



Brenda Crudo 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Joshua D. 
Cruickshank 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics / English 



Cormac M. Cullen 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Philosophy 




James S. Cullen 


Michael P. Cullinane 


Sarah L. Cummins 


Jennifer Ann 


Robert T. 


Arts & Sciences 

English 
Political Science 


Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 


Arts & Sciences 
English 


Cunningham 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 


Cunningham 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Iriane E. Curda 


Christine Curley 


William M. Curley 


Kerry Ann Curran 


Jeffrey L. Curtis 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Philosophy 


English 


Communication 


Sociology 


Finance 




Benedict D'Agostino 


Steven J. D'Alise 


Norman M. D'Amours 


Zeina Dagher 


Paola F. Dal Santo 


School of Management 


Arls & Sciences 


Aits & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Accounting 


History 


Economies 


Biology 


Biochemistry 


314 Seniors 












Tara M. Daly 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Michelle N. Damian 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Craig T. Danese 

School of Management 

Operations & Strat. Mgmt. 

Finance 



Brian D. Danforth 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Joseph F. Dargan 

School of Management 
Finance 




Elizabeth A. Dasto 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Navyn A. Datoo 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Sharon L. Daura 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jonathan David 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Keith M. Davidson 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Class of 1994 315 




Timothy J. Dawson 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Rosana De Simone 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Denise De Vlieger 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Firmin R. 

DeBrabander 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Heather A. Dean 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 



Stacy E. DeCario 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Maria C. DeCataldo 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 




Kevin F. Dee 


Diane DeGiorgio 


Joseph A. Del Guercio 


Matthew T. Del Negro 


Brian M. Delaney 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Marketing 


English 


Finance 


English 


Accounting 


K) Seniors 











Gregory K. Delaney 


Julie A. Delaney 


Kate H. Delay 


Maria B. DelSignore 


Anthony R. DeLuca 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Economics 


Elementary Education 
Hispanic Experience 


English 


Human Development 


English 




Daniela C. DeLuca 

Arts & Sciences 
Studio Art 



ren E. Dempsey 


Susan Demsey 


Mark E. DeNatale 


David P. DeRosa 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


Economics 
Sociology 


Finance 


History 




Class of 1994 317 



01 




Christopher Denker 


Erin E. Dente 


Deepak Deshmukh 


Steve Desrosiers 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Accounting 


English 


Biology 


History 




James DeVivo 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



o 



Ah 

Arland M. 
Di Girolamo 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science / Pre-Law 




John F. Dessauer 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 





Lauren J. Dewey 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 




Anthony E. Di Paoia 

Arts & Sciences 
Germanic Studies 




Peter C. Di Paoli 


Sam DiFeo 


Sheila M. Dillon 


Wendy E. Dinneen 


Christian L. 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


DiPentima 


Economics 


Finance 


English 


Philosophy 


Arts & Sciences 
English 


' 7 >\K Seniors 











Kevin C. DiPrete 

School of Management 

Operations & Srat. Mgmt. 

Information Systems 



Nicole DiSpena 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Christina Dittami 

School of Education 
Elementary / Mod. Special 
Nds. / Math & Comp. Sci. 



Maribeth L. Diver 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Glenn H. DiVincenzo 

School of Management 
Finance 




Christopher J. 
DiZinno 

School of Management 
Finance 



Brian M. Dobozi 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Amy J. Dodds 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



George J. Doehner 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Catherine M. Doheny 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Ryan P. Dolan 

School of Management 
Finance 



Michelle M. 
Donabedian 

Arts & Sciences 
French / Studio Art 



Kevin M. Donahue 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Lisa R. Donahue 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Peter R. Donaldson 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Pre-Med 




Tarah L. Donelan 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Melissa Dong 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



I 

Megan E. Donley 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Jennifer M. Donnelly 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Tracy A. Donohue 

School of Management 
Finance 



Class of 1994 319 



Don f t miss the 

magic of the 

moment by 

focusing on 

what's to 




Class of 1994 321 



Amy E. Donovan 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



John M. Donovan 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Irish Studies 



Mark P. Donovan 

Arts & Sciences 

Chemistry 
Computer Science 



Nicole Doppke 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Shawn M. Dornan 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 




^A HIPI 



Lisa M. Doty 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



John J. Dowd 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Sean M. Dowling 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 
Political Science 



Michael Downes 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Carolyn Downey 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 




Kristen M. Downey 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Shannon L. Doyle 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Nancy L. Drake 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Nancy E. Drane 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 
Communication 



Kathleen S. Dressel 

School of Management 
Marketing 




John S. Driscoll 


Mieka A. Driscoll 


Leora M. Dryer 


Maura M. Duff 


Michael P. Duffey 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Economics 


Accounting 
Information Systems 


Psychology 


Political Science 


Economics 


322 Seniors 











William M. Duffy 

School of Management 

Finance 
Human Resource Mgmt. 



Miguel F. Duran 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Gina M. Durante 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Kevin V. Durkin 

School of Management 
Finance 



Katie M. Dutch 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 




Cristina Echevarria 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Karen T. Eckstein 

Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 

Computer Science 



Shawn A. Edgar 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Daniel D. Edwards 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Charles G. Egoville 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Class of 1994 323 



Jennifer M. El-Hillow Christopher R. Elfner Jacques R. Elmaleh 

School of Management Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

Accounting Computer Science Biology 



Brenda L. Elsbree 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math / Computer Science 



Eileen A. Elvin 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Michael Emerman 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



William Enestvedt 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



James J. English Christine N. Engrassia Peter H. Enscoe 

School of Management Evening College Arts & Sciences 

Finance Business Management History 





Matthew W. Epright 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Candice M. Espinosa 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



324 Seniors 




James E. Everett 

School of Management 
Finance 



Leslie F. Everingham 

School of Education 

Elementary / Moderate 

Special Needs / Human Dev. 



Sarah E. Eversman 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Vincent L. Ewald 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kim C. Facey 

School of Management 
Finance 




Martin F. Fagan 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



w.j 

Jonathan B. Fahey 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Paul Fahey 

Evening College 
Business Management 



Jonathan M. Fallon 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Laurie A. Fallon 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Theater Arts 



Class of 1994 325 





m.± 



William G. Fallon 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communication 




Brian E. Falvey 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 




Robert N. Fanelli 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Nicolle A. Fardy 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Michelle N. Fares 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Alfred P. Farese 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Elizabeth A. Farrell 

School of Education 

Elementary / Moderate 

Special Needs / Human Dev. 




Julia A. Farrell 


Jill T. Farricy 


Bradford W. Fayfield 


Linda M. Federico 


Christine Federline 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Marketing 


Political Science 


Communication 


Secondary Education 
Mathematics 


Psychology 


326 Seniors 












Steven C. Feira 

School of Management 
Finance 



Patricia Felton 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 



Mark J. Fenelon 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Joseph A. Ferdani 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Economics 



Christopher M. 
Ferguson 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Martin 
Fernandez-Pello 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Elise F. Ferrara 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Jennifer A. Ferreira 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Ana M. Ferrer 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Ralph Ferro 

School of Management 
Finance 




Jennifer B. Ferron 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Taline Festekjian 

Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 

History 



Amanda E. Fetter 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Thanda A. Fields 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jeremy C. Finn 

School of Management 
Finance 




Teresa Finn 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Melanie A. Fiore 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Christopher H. 
Fioritto 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Elizabeth A. Fischbein 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



John J. Fish 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Class of 1994 327 




Class of 1994 329 




Ryan P. Fitzgerald 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Ann H. Fitzgibbon 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Colleen M. Flaherty 

School of Management 
Marketing 



William J. Flanagan 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



John A. Flavin 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 




Dane (). Fletcher 

Arls & Sciences 
( 'omputer Science 



Andrea T. Flores 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Joanne S. Flores 

Ails & Sciences 

Economics 

Spanish 



Maria F. Flores 

School of Management 
General Mgmt. / Operations 
& Strat, Mgmt. / Philosophy 



Kristan A. Flynn 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



330 Seniors 



Cara Fogg 


Cynthia M. Foley 


John M. Foley 


Marc D. Foley 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Marketing 


Environmental Geoscience 


Accounting 


Political Science 




Philosophy 




Irish Studies 



Matthew V. Fonte 

School of Management 
Finance 




Coleen M. Foody 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Michael C. Foraste 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Kelly A. Forbes 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 



Aaron W. Ford 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Brenna Ford 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 




Brian Scott Forschino Barbara A. Forster 

School of Management School of Management 



Accounting 



Finance 
Marketing 



Charles E. Fortin 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



David H. Fortin 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Lisa A. Fox 

School of Management 
Finance 




Erin K. Fracassa 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math & Computer Science 



Danielle A. Franchi 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Donald R. Frank 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jeffrey J. Franson 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



David J. Frauenhofer 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Class of 1994 331 





4..fc 



Nancy Ann Freda 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Donald F. Freeman 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Patricia L. Freeman Christopher G. Frezzo Shyama Friedenson 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

English Art History Political Science 

Economics International Relations 




Sharon E. Friedman 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Roger S. Froehlich 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Christopher Fuller 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Michael A. Fusco 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Caitlin A. Gaffney 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 





Debra Lynn Galasso 

School of Management 
Accounting 





* 



Katherine A. 
Gallagher 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



332 Seniors 




Lynne A. Gannon 

School of Education 

Elementary / Moderate 

Special Needs / Human Dev. 



Diana B. Garcia 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jane R. Gardner 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Jennifer L. Gardner 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Kevin G. Gardner 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Mary C. Garnett 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Black Studies 



Paula A. Garofalo 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Scott Gasparini 

School of Management 
Finance 



Hilary M. Gauvin 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Traci A. Gearty 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Class of 1994 333 




Do not delay; the 
golden moments 

fly! 

- Henry Wadsworth 
Longfellow 




Class of 1994 335 





You ain't a 
beauty but, 

hey, you 're all 
right... and 

that's all right 
with me. 

- Bruce Springsteen 





Class of 1994 337 



Matthew Lawrence 
Gebo 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Melissa A. Geller 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Mark W. Gemma 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Lynn N. Gentilcore 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Matthew C. Genung 

School of Management 
Marketing 
Philosophy 




John D. Geraghty 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Susan E. Gerrior 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Philosophy 



Michael D. Gershon 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Tania M. Giambro 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Sara F. Giffuni 

Arts & Sciences 
Spanish 





Douglas R. Gilison 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Nicole R. Gill 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



My Phuoc Ginnetti 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Kerry L. Gioffre 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Lora A. Gioioso 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Donna L. Giordano 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

English 



Todd M. Gleason 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Kathleen Hope 
Godbout 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Peter Godino 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Laurens M. Goff 

School of Management 
Finance 



338 Seniors 




Laurie A. Goguen 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Yvette Golay 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Emily Goldberg 

Arts & Sciences 
Endish 



Peter D. Golden 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




"Please don 'tfall! I can 't hold on to 
you much longer! " 




Maura E. Golding 


Michelle Goni 


Heather Goodwin 


Brian J. Gorczynski 


David D. Gordon 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Elementary / Moderate 


English 


Accounting 


Finance 


Communication 


Special Needs / Human Dev. 












Catherine A. Gorman 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Victor J. Gorospe 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Tara J. Goshco 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Kathryn A. Gosselin 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Josh Gottsegen 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Spanish 



Class of 1994 339 



Amy R. Grace 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Anne M. Grace 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Christopher John 
Grace 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology / Political Sci. 



David A. Grady 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



John M. Grandy 

Arls & Sciences 

Philosophy 
Political Science 



Andrea Grano 

Arls & Sciences 

English 

Theater Ans 



Kassandra M. Grant 

Aits & Sciences 
English 



Tessa Stefania 
Grazzini 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Joseph M. Grady 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

History 




David R. Grebe 

Arts & Sciences 

History 
Communication 



340 Seniors 





Christopher J. Greco 

School of Management 
Finance 



Natasha Grigger 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Donald Green 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Shannon L. Greenlee 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Katherine S. 
Gregorwich 

Arts & Sciences 
English / Communication 



Lucia D. Grillo 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Aimee M. Grmoljez 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Peter J. Grondin 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Gail M. Griffin 

School of Management 

Marketing 

English 





Jennifer L. Gross 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Kyle T. Grucci 

Arts & Sciences 

Information Systems 

Mathematics 



Daniel L. Grundig 

School of Management 



Marketing 




.4ifc 



Vincent Gubitosi 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 



Stephen J. Guelcher 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Michael V. Guglielmi 

School of Management 

Finance 
Information Systems 




Sarah H. Gulliver 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Vinita Gursahani 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Communication 



Charlene Gusman 

School of Management 

Human Resource 

Management 



Mauricio A. Gutierrez 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Manuel Guzman 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Class of 1994 341 




Seniors 




Smile a lot. It 

costs nothing and 

is beyond price. 

- H. Jackson Brown, Jr. 





Class of 1994 343 



Nazly M. Guzman 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Mary Clancy Haack Matthew R. Haberman Lisa N. Hadeed 

School of Education Arts & Sciences School of Management 

Human Development English Marketing 

Music Human Resource Mgmt. 



Beth V. Hager 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Jane Rita Hagopian 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Keith M. Haig 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Kevin M. Haley 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



William T. Hall 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Melissa K. Hambly 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 





Paul St. John 
Hamilton, III 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Kirsten K. Hammann 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

English 



344 Seniors 




Susan J. Hanley 

School of Education 

Elementary / Moderate 

Special Needs / Child in Soc. 



Holly A. Hanlon 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Psychology 



Brian P. Hannon 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jennifer L. Hannon 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Susan M. Hanscom 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Steven Hanson 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Music- 



Robert P. Harper 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Edward M. 
Harrington 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Ryan C. Harrington 

School of Management 
Finance 



Andrew J. Harris 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communication 



Class of 1994 345 



Tina Hartman 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Karima Hasan 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communication 



Jennifer A. Hatch 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Alyce T. Hatem 

Arts & Sciences 

Communication 

Philosophy 



Andrew G. Hatem 

School of Management 

Marketing 

English 




Ben S. Havens 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Kristin L. Hawkom 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Jennifer L. Hawley 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Daniel Joseph Hayes 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Christopher W. 
Hayhurst 

Arts & Sciences 
Env. Geoscience / English 




Joseph D. Healy 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Carolyn M. Healey 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Michelle M. Heaslip 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Alexis A. Heffernan 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Julie A. Heffernan 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 
Human Development 




John J. Hegarty 

School of Management 

Operations & Strategic 

Management 



Maria L. Hegarty 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Andrew J. Hegedus 

Ails & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Melissa L. Hegger 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



346 Seniors 




Shaun W. Heimann 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jennifer K. Helin 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Lynn E. Hendricks 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Michael C. Heraty 

School of Management 
Finance 





Leah M. Hermsen 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Laura M. Herpers 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

French 



Suzanne M. Hess 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Paul J. Hezel 

Arts & Sciences 
Physics 



Scott E. Hickey 

School of Management 

Human Resource 

Management 




Meredith A. Hickory 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Amy F. Hieter 

Arts & Sciences 

International Relations 

Political Science 



Frances M. Higgins 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Daniel Hill 

Arts & Sciences 

History 
Communication 



Susan J. Hiller 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Class of 1994 347 




s 



Jeffrey J. Hillins 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Tracy L. Hinchliffe 

Arts & Sciences 
Spanish 



I 

■ 

Andrew L. Hinkle 

School of Management 

Operations & Strategic 

Management 



Tracey R. Hirn 

School of Education 

Elementary / Moderate 

Special Needs / Child in Soc. 



William E. Hitchcock 

School of Management 
Computer Science 







Melinda G. Ho 

School of Management 
Finance 



Christopher E. 
Hochuli 

School of Management 
Finance 



Cheryl A. Hockman 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Robert F. Hofeman 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Heather A. Hoffman 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Jennifer L. Hofgartner 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Camila Holguin 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Christopher B. 
Holloway 

School of Management 
Finance / Marketing 



Bjorn B. Holta 

School of Management 

Finance 

Political Science 



John C. Houle 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Alexander S. Houston 

Arls & Sciences 
Communication 



Sarah Howe 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Diane E. Howells Timothy M. Hubbard 



Arts & Sciences 
International Relations 



Arls & Sciences 
Political Science 



Monica B. Huber 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



34S Seniors 




Nicole R. Huber 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Sabrina Huertas 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Joseph P. Hufnagel Caroline E. Hughes 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

Political Science Mathematics 





Derek A. Hughes 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Kara Hughes 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Marketing 



Catherine C. Huh 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Malia E. Hunt 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Theresa C. Hunt 

School of Management 
Finance 




Timothy J. Hunt 

School of Management 
Finance 



Alison J. Hunter 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Thomas R. Hurford 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jeanne M. Hurley 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Michael D. Hurley 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Class of 1994 349 



What 
would we 
do baby, 
without 
us...sha- 
la-la-la? 

-Family Ties 




Class of 1994 351 




Siobhan L. Hurley 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Studies 




Christine E. Hurson 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

History 




Joseph D. Hurta 


Amy E. Hutchins 


Kendra L. Hutchinson 


Ann L. Hyland 


Laura M. Iacovelli 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Psychology 


Elementary / Moderate 
Special Needs / Human Dev. 


Accounting 


Communication 


Accounting 




*J*i 




Julie A. Igoe 

School ni Education 

Secondary Education 

History 



Susan Lynn Ij»oe 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Enna B. Ijjasz 

School of Management 
Economics 

Marketing 



Jeffrey A. Ingalls 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kylie J. lofredo 

Arts & Sciences 
Enulish 



352 Seniors 



Amy E. Iovieno 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Nicholas T. Irons 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Saro Iskenderian 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



George W. Jabren 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Kari E. Jackson 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Stephen Charles 
Jacques 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Christina D. 
Jastrzebski 

School of Education 
Elementary Ed. / English 




Sandra Jean-Louis 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Joanna L. James 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Michael A. Janik 

School of Management 
Finance 



Michael J. Janvrin 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Angelica F. Jaramillo 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Class of 1994 353 



Pauline A. Jeffrey 

Arts & Sciences 
Theology 



Rebecca E. Jerman 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Christopher J. 
Jeszenszky 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Jason M. Jobe 

School of Management 

Marketing 
Information Systems 



Tracey M. Johns 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 
Communication 




Brian F. Johnson 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Penny L. Johnson 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Stephen B. Johnson 

School of Management 
Economics 



Fiona E. Johnston 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Christopher M. Jones 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 





Jennifer A. Jones 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Jennifer A. Jones 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



354 Seniors 




"Hey guys! Looking for these?" 




Kelly E. Jones 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



^^k /*' j^B^Sk £BS 




^^^fe" ^1 


1 



Rhoan C. Jones 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Alaina B. Jose 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Claudine R. Josiger 

School of Management 
General Management 



Susan M. Joy 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Amie T. Joyce 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



John P. Joyce 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 




Natacha Julien 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Mark D. Jurgen 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Diana S. Juzups 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 
Human Development 



Jonah-Kuhio K. 
Kaauwai 

School of Management 
Marketing / Philosophy 



James I. Kakos 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Secondary Education 



Class of 1994 355 



Paul C. Kalac 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Carina T. Kalaw 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Joseph L. Kamara 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Kathleen P. Kane 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 



Michael J. Kane 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Vicky L. Kane 

School of Management 
Finance 



Caroline M. Kansky 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Jennifer L. Kardys 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Maria O. Karloutsos 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

American Heritage 



Mitsuko Katayama 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 




Wanda K. Kato 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Chadi A. Kawkabani Kristin E. Keating Sarah M. Keating 



Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



School of Management 
Accounting 



School of Education 

Elementary / Moderate 

Special Needs / Human Dev. 



Kelly J. Keefer 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Margaret Glenna 
Keene 

Arts & Sciences 
Music 



Grace-Marie B. Kelly 

Ails & Sciences 
English 



James F. Kelly 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jodiann Kelly 

Arts & Sciences 

French 

Secondary Education 



Laura E. Kelly 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



356 Seniors 




Jori A. Keogan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kellie Ann Keohan 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communication 



Martin J. Kestler 

School of Management 
Finance 



Nazia Khaliq 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Syed Ahmed AH Khan 

School of Management 
Accounting 




John Kienker 


Matthew W. Kiernan 


Karen E. Kiley 


Marjorie Kilroy 


Jae Hyun Kim 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Evening College 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


Communication 


Human Development 


Business 


Biology 
Class of 1994 357 



94 



35H 



When you go out into 

the world, watch out for 

traffic, hold hands, and 

stick together. 

- Robert Fulghum 





Seniors 





Class of 1994 359 



Kathleen Kim 

School of Management 

Accounting 
Human Development 



Nayoung Kim 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Kumiko Kimura 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Brian M. King 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Catherine Christine 

King 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 




Alison P. Klein 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Peter H. Klein 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Nicole M. Klett 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Communication 



Kelly A. Knowe 

School of Management 
Accounting 
Economics 



Brenda P. Koch 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math / Computer Science 



U)0 Seniors 



Amanda F. Koenig 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Michael J. Koenig 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Nicholas J. Kolokithas 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Spanish 



Cynthia H. Komo 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Elias Konstantinidis 

School of Management 
Finance 




Ryan D. Kotula 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Christopher S. Kovach 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Philosophy 



Ian S. Kovalik 

Arts & Sciences 
Russian 



Kimberly A. 
Kozemchak 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Kelly A. Koziell 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Elizabeth M. Kreeft 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Nikolaos Krithariotis 

School of Management 
General Management 



Rodolfo Kronfle 

School of Management 

Finance 

Art History 



Audra L. Krystofolski 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Scott P. Kudrick 

School of Management 
General Management 




***** 




Jason A. Kuuskraa 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Mark D. La Cava 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Elena La Gratta 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Gina M. La Porta 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Elizabeth D. La Rocca 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

History 



Class of 1994 361 



Stephen Richard 
La Sala 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Maribel Laboy 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Christine Lafontant 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Louis R. Laggy III 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Jerome Laguilles 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 
Psychology 




Jennifer C. Lahr 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Sharon J. Laidlaw 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Susan E. Laird 

School of Management 

Marketing 
Human Resource Mgmt. 



Gregg J. Lallier 

School of Management 
Operations & Strategic 
Management/ History 



Pui L. Lam 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




James P. Lamanna 

Arts & Sciences 
History 
English 



Heidi R. Lambert 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Biology 



Michele Lamura 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Michael J. Landolfi 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Catherine A. Lane 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Julie A. Lane 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

English 



Timothy S. Lane 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Allison K. Langkopf 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Norma W. 
Laohaphan 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Sawangchit Laohathai 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Philosophy 



362 Seniors 



Paola M. T. Lapira 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

Mathematics 



David J. Laquidara 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Annia M. Laquis 

School of Education 

Middle School Education 

Philosophy 



Erin C. Larkin 

School of Management 
Accounting 



David M. Larsen 

School of Management 
Economics 




Cheryl Lastomirsky 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Donna M. Laudicino 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Melissa Laux 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Roger A. Le Page, Jr. 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



William J. Leahy 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Class of 1994 363 




Duane P. Lee 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jessie S. Lee 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Mei Yee Lee 

School of Management 
Marketing 



H 
Paul Y. P. Lee 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Sociology 




Giselle Leal 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communication 




Bo-Hyung Lee 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 




Susan Lee 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Mary F. Leger 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Jennifer A. Lein 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Melissa A. Lembo 

School of Education 

Elementary / Mod. Specie 

Needs / Human Dev. 



Magda A. Lemus Gregory James Lentini 

School of Nursing School of Management 

Nursing Finance 



364 Seniors 



Joseph A. Lentino Christine M. Leonard 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

Economics International Studies 



Ryan Timothy 
Leonard 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



James R. Leontiades Stephanie J. Letersky 

School of Management Arts & Sciences 

Finance Studio Art 




Anna Yee Yee Leung 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Information Systems 




Thomas P. Leyden, Jr. 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Chun Li 

School of Management 
Finance 



Michelle Wai-Min 
Leung 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Dina S. Leventis 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Carla A. Lewis 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Jennifer Lewis 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Class of 1994 365 



94 



n Purple Shaahnxj 
:lcomes bach 

CMSSof "94" 



0P_ THERE IT 1ST 





Sometimes you wanna 

go where 

everybody knows 

your name, and they're 

always glad you came. 

- Cheers 




V f 1 




! \ 




i /- 

t 


A 



Class of 1994 367 





Kay K. Li 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 
Communication 




Joseph J. Liberato II 

School of Management 

Operations & Strat. Mgmt. 

Philosophy 




Salvadore A. Liberto 

Arts & Sciences 

Communication 

P hilosophy 



Patricia Lidle 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Steven A. Light 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Jennifer S. Lightner 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Biology 



Jeffrey M. Liguori 

School of Management 
Finance 




Karen G. Lim 


Eric Linzer 


Joyce Y. Liu 


Eric Joseph Liwanag 


Ramon T. Llamas 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Psychology 


Political Science 
English 


Economics 


Marketing 


Human Resource 
Management 


368 Seniors 











Christian L. Loban 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Margaret N. Lobeck 

School of Management 
Finance 



Bryan R. Locke 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Sociology 



John Loftus 

Evening College 
Communication 



Carolyn E. Logan 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 




Joseph C. Logudic Bethann Lojko 

School of Management School of Education 

Human Resource Mgmt Elementary / Moderate 

International Management Special Needs / Human Dev. 



Jennifer E. Lombard 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Peter D. Loncto 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Michelle Marie 
Londino 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 




Roberta J. London 

School of Management 
Marketing 



John P. Lorden 

School of Management 

Information Systems 

Finance 



Josephine Losada 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Matthew G. Lotty 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Jennifer L. Loughman 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Patrick J. Loughren 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Elizabeth A. Louney 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Antonio A. Lourenco 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Paul J. Lozier, Jr. 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



James J. Lucchese 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Class of 1994 369 



Wing Pui Luie 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Stephanie Luttrell 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Amy C. Lutz 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Christie L. Lynch 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Peter Matthew Lynch 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Peter W. MacFadyen 

School of Kducation 

Human Development 

Psychology 



Catherine E. 

Mat-Arthur 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Raymond G. Maceren 

Ails & Sciences 
Psychology 



Sarah E. Mackay 

Ails & Sciences 
English 



Joanna G. Mackres 

Arts & Sciences 

Classical Civilization 

Pre-Med 



370 Seniors 



Scott D. Macquarrie 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Jessica D. Macrae 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Angela L. Macsenti 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Laura M. Magazu 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Brian T. Maguire 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Kathleen Maguire 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Gregory Thomas 

Mahan 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Andrew Maher 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Jill S. Mahonchak 

School of Management 
Finance 



Christopher M. 
Mahoney 

Arts & Sciences 
English / Theology 




Sarah B. Mahoney 


Steven P. Mahoney 


Preston R. Maigetter 


Dean Maines 


Sreypeov Maiy 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Nursing 


English 


English 
Spanish 


Economics 


Accounting 


Nursing 




Liza Makowski 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Michael M. Malizia 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Saudia Mallard 

School of Management 
Marketing 



John A. Malnati 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 



James B. Malone 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Class of 1994 371 







Brian B. Malone* 



James Maloney 


Michael J. Maloney 


Paula Malonev 


Sandra Mancinelli 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Marketing 


English 


English 


Marketing 


Finance 






Human Resource MgmL 




w* <<~f 



f 




Joseph C. Mangan 



Michael P. Mangan 
Am & Sciences 
Political Science 



Jason A. Manganaro 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

History 



Nicholas P. 
Mangiapane 

School of Management 
Finance/ Op. & Strat. Mgmt 




Brian P. Manning 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Anissa C. Mansoor 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Cheryl L. Mantia 
School of Management 

Economics 



372 Seniors 





I 



Mario >. Marvhese 
s& Sciences 




Joseph P. Marvhetti 
■-. - .v Se 8 ices 




Stephen R. Marciano 


Noreeo Marhn 


b an n larina 


Angela M. Marinelli 


Christine M. 


Arts -v Sc - ices 


Art- ft Se i ices 


Carcia-Raron 


5 ft Sc e ices 


Markevich 


".muntca: is 


English 


Schoe Man; ae ment 


g ish 


■ - .^ S> -' \v> 






k ice Ma v. - - e 


[ ' ,'. o • 


Ps c .- CWJ 




\ntonietta C. Marotta 


Krik J. Marquis 


Christopher NX . 


David J. Martin 


Pa>id J. Martin 


Arts A Saena s 


Arts ft Sciem - 


Martin 


An- $ Sc . ices 


An- ft Se . ices 


Political Science 


Mathematics 


Arts vt Sciences 
v ence 


C vnxistn 


dish 
Class of 1994 373 



94 



The future 's so 

bright, we gotta 

wear shades! 




1 fTWi - WrataSl 






• 
» ■ 


" JAW ? " 


j * 
v 

». 




^3$ 


QLLEGE 


IJ 


<_ 


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374 



Seniors 





Class of 1994 375 






David R. Martin 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jennifer K. Martin 

Arts & Sciences 
English 
French 



Louise Blaul Martin 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Melissa M. Martin 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Michael P. Martin 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 







Noreen Ann Martin 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

English 



Christine M. Martinez 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

International Studies 



Cylysce I. Martinez 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Theatre Arts 



Elisabeth D. Martinez 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Matthew J. Martino 

School of Education 
Human Development 




Melissa Marxuach 

Arts & Sciences 
French 



Susan K. Mason 

Arts & Sciences 
Theatre Arts 



Dominic J. Massardo 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Susan D. Master 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Tania Mastrapa 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Melissa Mastriani 

School ol'Hducation 

Set 1; 1 1 > l.dikulioii 

English 



Cheryl Mastrogiovanni Michelle Mastroianni 

Ails & Sciences School of Management 

Psychology Accounting 
English 



Danio Mastropieri 

Ails & Sciences 
Political Science 



Christopher M. 
Matarazzo 

Aits & Sciences 
Biology 



376 Seniors 







Arun Mathur 

School of Management 

Economics 

Information Systems 



Margot L. Matthews 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Suzanne L. Matula 

Arts & Sciences 
Linguistics 



Eric T. Matzinger 

School of Management 
Finance 




Lisa S. Mazaheri 

School of Management 
Economics 



Michael J. Mazella 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Psychology 



Sean P. McEllin 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Kevin McArdle 

School of Management 
Accounting 



John J. Maxham 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Elizabeth M. Mayer 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Pedro A. Mayoral 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 




Michael P. McArdle 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Class of 1994 377 




Sheila McArdle 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Aimee B. McAuley 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Meghan D. McAuley 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Roger W. McAvoy 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Carey J. McCabe 

School of Education 
Elementary / Mod. Special 
Nds. / Math & Comp. Sci. 




Mark McCarron 

School of Management 
Finance 



Robert A. McCarter 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Brian P. McCarthy 

School of Management 
Finance 



Colin G. McCarthy 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Karen A. McCarthy 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




William A. McCarthy Elizabeth McCartney 

Arts & Sciences School of Education 

Economics Elementary Education 

Hispanic Exp 



Brian M. McCarty 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jason E. McClellan 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 
Pre-Med 



Margaret A. 
McConville 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Kristen M. 
McCormick 

School of Education 

klumentary / Child in Society 



Mark C. McCue 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Shannon McDevitt 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Daniel C. McDonald Michael J. McDonough 



School of Management 
Economics 



School of Management 
Finance 



MH Seniors 




Kelly A. McElroy 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Philosophy 



Brian F. McEvoy 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Michael J. McGaughey 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Kristin M. McGee 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Joseph B. McGlinchey Angela M. McGovern 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

Psychology Psychology 



Brian C. McGovern 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



David C. McGrath 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Psychology 



Marie B. McGrath 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Jeremy Scott McGraw 

School of Manangement 

Finance 

Economics 



Thomas P. McGuire 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Carol Mclntyre 

Evening College 
Business 



Karalyn M. Mclntyre 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Class of 1994 379 




Escape to the Cape. 




Sarah McKannay 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




William J. McKay 

Arts & Sciences 
Theatre Arts 




Heather A. McKeigue 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Alex J. McKenna 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Carolyn F. McKenna 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Brian C. McKevitt 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Robert T. McKim 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 




Laura I). McLaughlin 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

English 



Matthew J. 
McLaughlin 

Ails & Sciences 
English 



Michael J. 
McLaughlin 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Morgen M. 

McLaughlin 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 



Nalani-Alua 
McLaughlin 

School of Management 
Marketing/ Hum. Res. Mgmt 



380 Seniors 



Christine M. McLean 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Kara E. McLucas 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Erin A. McManus Patrick J. McMonagle Brian P. McMullen 

School of Management Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

Huamn Resource History History 

Management 




Robert J. McMullin 

Evening College 
Business Management 




Todd P. McWhinnie 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Justin Anthony 
Medaglia 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Matthew H. 
McNamara 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Nancy J. McNamara 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 

Theater Arts 



Paul J. 
McNamara, Jr. 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Meredith L. McNeilage 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Class of 1994 381 




Class of 1994 383 




Carol J. Meharg 

School of Management 
Finance 



Vivek Mehra 

School of Management 
Finance 



Luis Melendez 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Erinn E. Melia 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Geoffry R. Meek 

Arts & Sciences 

Physics 

Philosophy 



Nicole L. Meffen 

School of Management 
Accounting 



James P. Mello 

School of Management 
Finance 




Willie J. Melton 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Pre-Med 



Jennifer Melvin 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Debora M. Mendonca 

Aits & Sciences 
Communication 



Jennifer S. Menon Kristin Lynn Mercer 

School of Education Arts & Sciences 

Elementary Education Mathematics 

Hispanic lixperiencc 



384 Seniors 



Stephen C. Merchant Richard E. Merklinger Carrie R. Merrill 



School of Management 
Accounting 



Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



\ ■ t - ¥ 



Nancy L. Merwin 

Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 

Sociology 



Melissa A. Metcalf 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 






Christopher H. Meyer 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Jason J. Meyer 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jonathan R. Meyer 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



A fe 



Kevin A. Meyers 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Julie N. Michailidis 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communication 




Todd A. Michalik 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Anne M. Michalman 

School of Education 

Elementary / Mod. Spec. 

Needs / Am. Heritage 



Joseph F. Miclat 

Arts & Sciences 

Communication 

Philosophy 



Marsha I. Miclat 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Jon C. Middleton 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communication 




Emilios Milios 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Nikolas Milios 

School of Management 
Finance 



Erin Miller 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 
Human Development 



Gregory E. Miller 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 



Marcia E. Miller 

Arts & Sciences 
Museum Studies 



Class of 1994 385 



Susan Min 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Michael W. Miner 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Christina S. Mirabile Joanna V. Mirrington David B. Mitchell 

Arts & Sciences School of Manangement School of Management 

Sociology Finance Economics 

Economics Operations & Strat. Mgmt. 




Joseph P. Mitchell 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Patricia E. Mittler 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Timothy Mokarry 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Megan P. Molinaro 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Jonna M. Mollicone 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 




John Bjorn Mollo 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 
Political Science 




Catherine H. 
Momtchiloff 

School of Management 
Finance 



3X6 Seniors 




Didn't Mom always say not to play with fire? 




Anthony J. Monaco 

School of Management 
Finance 




Jonathan R. 
Moneypenny 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




r 





Lillian M. Montalvo 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Julie P. Montana 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



^ f ^■i^B 



Michael E. Monteiro Raymond A. Montes 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science Economics 



Alexandra M. 
Montoya 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 




Carr D. Moody 

School of Management 

Finance 
General Management 



Todd C. Mooney 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Donna Chen Moore 

School of Management 
Marketing 
Accounting 



Scott J. Moore 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Elaine Morales 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Pre-Law 



Class of 1994 387 




Stephanie Morano 

School of Management 
Marketing 



David A. Morello 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Timothy J. Morello 

School of Management 
Finance 



Geoffrey B. Morris 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Gretchen K. Morris 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Michael J. Morris 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



c 



Edward D. Morrison 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Elizabeth A. Morse 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Sociology 



Karen L. Morse 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Gretchen Mount 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Heather C. Mowrey 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Kelly M. Mulcahy 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Jill M. Mullare 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



i w i w 
Antonia W. Moser 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Colleen M. Mullen 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 




Kevin J. Mullen 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 
Economics 



Eleanor A. Muller 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

American Heritage 



Margaret Lee 
Mumford 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Luisa G. Muniz 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Laurie A. Murawski 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



3XX Seniors 





Arts & Sciences 
History 



James L. Murphy, Jr. 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Kristin M. Murphy 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Rebecca K. Murphy 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Martin D. Nagle 

Arts & Sciences 

Germanic Studies 



Mridu Nagrath 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Yoko Nakanishi 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Stephanie M. Nakielny 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Sabina A. Murphy 

Arts & Sciences 
English 
Pre-Med 



James L. Murray 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Thomas Murray 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Tracy L. Nansel 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

English 



Class of 1994 389 



We like feeling good, 

looking good y and 

doing good! 




Class of 1994 391 



Cardine Napoleon 

School of Management 

Finance 
Human Resource Mgmt. 




Sanjiv Nehra 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Robyn A. Nelson 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jeanine M. Napoli 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Jonas L. Navickas 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 



Lisa C. Navratil 

Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 

Psychology 




Joseph J. Negley 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Catherine M. Nelson 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Elizabeth A. Neviera 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Julie A. Newcomer 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Benjamin N. Ng 
Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Ka Wah Ng 

Ails & Sciences 

Physics 

Mathematics 



Ka Yan Ng 

School of Management 
Accounting 
Economics 



Wing Nga Ng 

School of Management 

Accounting 



392 Seniors 



Kamwili R. Ngondo 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Jonathan R. Nichols 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Jeffrey M. Nicholson 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Music 



Maura Nicholson 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Natasha Nicolaides 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




i 1 1 m tod to 



Brian D. Niland 

School of Management 
Accountina 



Matthew T. Niziol 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Timothy J. Noel 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Michelle L. Nottoli 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Michael J. Novack 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Debra K. Nugent 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

History 



Tara B. Nulty 

Arts & Sciences 

Theatre Arts 

Economics 



Kristen L. Nystrom 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Christine E. O'Brien 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Sociology / Child in Society 



J. Quinn O'Brien 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Jennifer L. O'Connell 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Catherine O'Connor 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Gwen A. O'Connor 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Mary Elizabeth 
O'Donnell 

School of Education 
Elementary / Human Dev. 



Timothy C. O'Donnell 

Arts & Sciences 

English 



Class of 1994 393 




1 



Ronan P. O'Flaherty 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Erin M. O'Hanlon 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Elizabeth O'Hearn 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Sociology 



Anne Kathryn O'Keefe 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communication 



Brenna O'Leary 

Arts & Sciences 
French 




Elizabeth M. O'Leary 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Jane M. O'Leary 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kathryn S. O'Leary 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



LeifS. O'Leary 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Jessica A. O'Malley 

Arts & Sciences 



English 




Erin O'Reilly 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Kristen M. O'Reilly 

School of Managment 
Accounting 



Tania Ochoa 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Chris O. Ogbonnah 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Kimberly Y. Oh 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 




Paula C. Oliveira 


Nilhan Olmez 


Elizabeth L. Orem 


Alexander F. Orig 


Ignacio A. Ortiz 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Elementary Education 


Psychology 


Early Childhood 


Sociology 


English 


Psychology 




Math & Computer Science 


Pre-Dental 




394 Seniors 











Maria Elena Ortiz Jennifer M. Osborne 

Arts & Sciences School of Education 

Psychology Secondary Education 

English 



Kristen Ostheimer Amy Carla Ostrander 

Arts & Sciences School of Education 

History Early Childhood 

Child in Society 




James R. Ouellette 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Charles R. Pagano 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Diane M. Paggioli 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Richard M. Paglia 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Spanish 



Ernest J. Palazzolo 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Andrea J. Palermo 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 
Human Development 



Andrea L. Pallotta 

School of Management 
Finance 



Erik G. Palm 

School of Management 
Operations & Strat. Mgmt. 



Barbara L. Palmer 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 
Child in Society 



Class of 1994 395 



94 





Live life as an 

exclamation not as 

an explanation! 




Class of 1994 397 



William Kuang-Yao Robert W. Papenbrock 

Pan School of Management 

Arts & Sciences Finance 
Mathematics 



Mary Beth Parisi 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Chung W. Park 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Nameson Park 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Catherine S. Parker 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Jennifer E. Parker 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Donald J. Pashayan 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Mrugen H. Patel 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 




Rupal J. Patel 

School of Management 
Finance 




Jennifer E. Patenaude 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Claire L. Patton 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



3W Seniors 





i 

• 


V 


1 

1 

1 

1 


AL _ 4fc 






Touchdown Jesus was so good to us on Nov. 20! 




Catherine E. Paul 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Kevin A. Pellerin 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Jeffrey P. Pelletier 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Robert Pelosi 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Frederica A. Peluso Shelly L. Pendergrass 

School of Education School of Education 

Human Development Elementary Education 

Math & Computer Science 



Vanessa C. Penna 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Krysten A. Pepe 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Laurie A. Pepi 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Gregory S. Pepper 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Carmen I. Perez 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Morrissey A. Perfetti 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Class of 1994 399 





400 



Seniors 





Let the games 

begin... 

but first, 

let's have a 

party! 





Class of 1994 401 



Kathryn A. Perrotti 

Arts & Sciences 

English 




Daniel W. Peterkoski 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 




Maria T. Pettit 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Michele L. Perrotti 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Maria C. Perunic 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

English 



Antonio Pesce 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Emergency! 



Shireen M. Pesez 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

English 




Christa D. Peters 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Eleanor L. Pfeffermam 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

English 




(iayle P. Phadungchai Christine M. Philbin Jennifer E. Phillippe 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences School of Education 

Biochemistry English Secondary Education 

Mathematics 



402 Seniors 



Georgia Phillips 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 
Human Development 



Jacqueline W. Phillips 

School of Management 
Marketing 



a *h 







Michael T. Phillips 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Gail L. Piazza 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Vipaporn 
Pichedvanichok 

School of Management 
Finance 



Timothy J. Pierotti 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Dawn F. Pighetti 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 




Kristen M. Pike 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Keith A. Piken 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



v 
h 

Fernando M. Pinguelo 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Philosophy 



Michael J. Piro 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Donald J. Pirozzi 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Edward J. Pirrera 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Patricia Piatt 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Gianina Plihal 

School of Management 

Marketing 
Human Resource Mgmt. 



Susan M. Ploder 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Kristine M. Pollicino 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Nicole M. Polselli 

School of Management 
Marketing 



David E. Poltack 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Alejandro A. Poma 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Laura A. Postiglione 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Karen Potookian 

Arts & Sciences 

International Relations 

Linguistics 



Class of 1994 403 




Suzanne E. Powell 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Tara S. Power 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

Mathematics 



John P. Powers 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Mary N. Powers 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Daniel B. Prather 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 




Bethany M. Pratt 

Arls & Sciences 
International Studies 



Michael I). Price 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Pamela N. Prois 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 
Human Development 



Paul J. Proscia 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Warren A. Prunella 

Ails & Sciences 
Political Science 



404 Seniors 



Melanie L. Prusinski 

School of Management 
Accountina 



Matthew F. Pumo 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Timothy M. Pyne 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Alison F. Quaker 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 
Italian Studies 



Lorenzo R. Quinones 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Tammy N. Quon 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Ronnettee V. Ramos 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Political Science 




Courtney A. Rau 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Eric Raffi 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Tina Raia 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 



Nikhil N. Ramchand 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Carlos V. Ramos 

School of Management 
Accounting 
Psychology 




Class of 1994 405 




Kristin A. Rauscher 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Julia Reardon 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 



Kimberly Reardon 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Anna G. Reboli 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Marybeth R. Rectra 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Lisa M. Re 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Naveen Reddy 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Amy L. Reed 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Brian D. Reed 

Arts & Sciences 

Communication 

Theater Arts 



Leo A. Reed 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Kristina D. Reeves 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 
Human Development 



Michelle C. Regalia 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Political Science 



406 Seniors 





Patrick O. Regan 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Timothy J. Reichardt Mary Elizabeth Reidy 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics Political Science 



David R. Reilly 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



John F. Reilly 

Arts & Sciences 
Spanish 




Stefani A. Reitter 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 

English 



Andrew J. Rella 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Christopher C. 
Remondi 

School of Management 
Finance/ Marketing 



Michael C. Rennick 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Philosophy 



John S. Renza 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Brian J. Renzi 


Allyson M. Resha 


Jennifer A. Reusse 


Grace T. Reyes 


Ronald E. Reyna 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Sociology 


Sociology 


Economics 
English 


Biology 


Biology 




Sara E. Reynolds 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Michael J. Ricciardi 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Kimberly B. Riccitelli 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Sean D. Rice 

School of Management 
Finance 



Matthew F. Richter 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Human Resource Mgmt. Operations & Strat. Mgmt. 



Class of 1994 407 




A friend is a 

person who knows 

all about you... 

but likes you 

anyway! 



it ^T 

/(El 


Uw 1 |i4Hl 




-\ r M- tf k 


^>H 




Class of 1994 409 



Elizabeth A. Riehman Patricia M. Rigney Jonathan M. Rish Kimberly J. Rivard Christopher C. Rivera 



School of Management 
Accounting 



School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Art & Sciences 
Communication 



School of Management 

Accounting 

Marketing 



School of Management 
Marketing 




Javier Francisco 
Rivero 

School of Management 
Finance 



Vincent J. Rivers 

School of Management 
Finance 



Ramy Rizkalla 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Lorenda M. Robinson 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Victoria A. Roch 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 




Siobhan C. Roddy 

School of Education 

Human Development 

English 



Julie E. Rohr 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Meredith J. Roman 

School of Management 
Finance 



Seth G. Roman 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Julie Ann Romano 

School of Education 

Human Development 

English 




Karen Romanoff 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Peter J. Rooney 

Ails & Sciences 
English 



Michael P. Roper 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Deborah S. Rosengurt 

School of Management 
Marketing 



■ 

Matthew M. Rosini 

School of Management 
Finance 



410 Seniors 



Jennifer E. Ross 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Emily L. Roy 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 
Child in Society 



Scott W. Roy 

School of Management 
General Management 



Jeremy S. Royster 

Arts & Sciences 

Studio Art 

English 




Roadtripping to Rutgers 



Javier Rua-Jovet 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Elizabeth Ann Rubin 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Jennifer A. Rudolph 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 




Maria E. Ruiz 

Arts & Sciences 
Spanish 
English 



Indra Rupners 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 



Heather Rurak 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Christopher J. Rusho 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Joy Russell-Perez 

Arts & Sciences 

Communication 

Marketing 



Class of 1994 411 




Jennifer A. Ryan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Thomas J. Ryan 

School of Management 
Finance 



Peter Sadlier 

School of Management 

Computer Science 
Business Administration 



Lailani S. Salcedo 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Music 



Carolee Salerno 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Nancy J. Salerno 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

History 



Jennifer E. Salhus 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



George J. Salles 

Art & Sciences 
Political Science 



Keith V. Salvatore 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Manuel J. Sanchez- 
Ferrero 

School of Management 
Finance / Marketing 



412 Seniors 



Lisa Marie Santagate 


Maria Adela 


Erik Santiago 


Aileen C. Santos 


Oscar Santos 


School of Nursing 


Santamaria 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Nursing 


School of Management 
Marketing/ Hum. Res. Mgmt 


English 


Accounting 


English 
History 




John B. Sarno 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Edmund J. Sarraille 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Susanne A. Sasser 

Arts & Sciences 
Spanish 



Mariangela Sassi 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Nicholas J. Satovick 

Arts & Sciences 
Env. Geoscience 




Susan Saunders 

School of Education 

Elementary / Secondary 

History 



Robert J. Savinelli 

School of Management 
Accounting 
Marketing 



Tara L. Savoie 

Art & Sciences 
Sociology 



Paul B. Saxton 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Amy K. Sbrolla 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Michael P. Scanlon 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Karen L. Scannell 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Christina M. Scarlata 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 



Eric R. Schade 

School of Management 
Finance 



Michelle Schiano 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Class of 1994 413 



94 



Pay attention 

and you'll find 

many perfect moments 

in any given day. 







Class of 1994 415 




Kent R. Schneider 

School of Management 

Operations & Strategic 

Management 



Britt L. Schnorr 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Mary C. Schrader 

Arts & Sciences 
Theatre Arts 
Psychology 



Kathleen M. Schraven 

School of Management 
General Management 



Mark G. Schroffner 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Katherine E. Schultz 

Ails & Sciences 

Psychology 

Biology 



416 Seniors 



Anthony C. Sciacca 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Brian J. Scott 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Ellen Scott 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



William E. Scott 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 




Jessica M. Scully Crystal L. Seaforth 



Arts & Sciences 

English 

Art History 



Arts & Sciences 
English 



Rebecca J. Sears 

School of Management 
Marketing 



V 



Scott E. Selmecki 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 
Env. Geoscience 




Michelle R. Sergent 

Arts & Sciences 
French 




Allyson M. Servoss 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Eric Pascal Sevos 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Psychology 



Brian M. Sewald 

School of Management 

Operations & Strategic 

Management 



Andrew G. Sexton 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Katherine T. Seymour 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Andrea Shafer 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Andrea M. Shaffer 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Irish Studies 




Of course we're legal! 



Class of 1994 417 



John L. Shahdanian 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Grace B. Shalhoub 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Patrick T. Shanley 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Erin D. Shannon 

Arts & Sciences 
Independent Studies 



Heather M. Shaw 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Christina S. Shea 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Child in Society 



Robert J. Shea 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jeffrey B. Sheer 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Gregory Allen Shepard 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Kevin Sherman 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Heather J. Sherr 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kerry Shields 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Yohji Shionoya 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Dwight A. Shirley 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Psychology 



Shahban Shoukat 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Joseph J. Shropshire 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Sandra Shubilla 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 
Psychology 



Deborah A. Sibley 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Mary Alice Sieggreen 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Eugene C. Signorini 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

English 



418 Seniors 




Camilla M. 
Sigvardsson 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Lucy Sileo 

School of Management 
Finance 




Jason R. Silkey 

Arts & Sciences 
English 
Pre-Med 



Rebecca L. Silva 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Sara Paula T. Silva 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 
Women's Studies 




Juan Simon 

School of Management 

Marketing / Finance 

Operations & Strat. Mgmt. 



Daniel J. Simone 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Maura E. Slayne 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Deanna L. Sloan 

School of Education 

Elementary / Mod. Special 

Needs / Am. Heritage 




Ivan V. Small 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Bonnie J. Smarsh 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Amy L. Smith 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Bryan E. Smith 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



David M. Smith 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Class of 1994 419 





Class of 1994 421 




Laughter is the 

shortest distance 

between two 

people. 




Class of 1994 423 





>*4* 



Kathleen Anne Smith 


Sara C. Smith 


Stacie A. Smith 


Stuart E. Smith 


Marc Soave 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Evening College 


Accounting 


Human Resource Mgmt. 
Psychology 


Philosophy 


English 
Economics 


Business Management 





Joan M. Solimine 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 



Jun Young Son 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Judy Y. Soohoo 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Natasha A. Sorelli 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Claudine Sorenson 

Arts & Sciences 
English 





Yukmila M. Soriano 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Nicole L. Sorokolit 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



424 Seniors 




Michael A. Spalla 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Maura N. Spellman 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



John H. Spencer 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Kerri T. Spillane 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 

Psychology 



4 



Jeffrey D. Sowa 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Christopher Spain 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Suzanne M. Squarcia 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 
Communication 




Christopher M. 
Squillante 

School of Management 
Operations & Strat. Mgmt. 



Katherine E. St. Clair 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Michelle C. St. Pierre 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



William A. Staar 

Arts & Sciences 
Pre-Law 
History 



Margaret S. Stack 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Class of 1994 425 




Karen J. Stadolnik 

School of Management 

Finance 
Information Systems 



H 

Anthony J. Stafford 

School of Management 
Finance 



Suzanne Stahlie 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Cary N. Stallings 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Mara E. Stein 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



John M. Steiner 

Ails & Sciences 
Political Science 



Elizabeth A. Stephens 

Ails & Sciences 
Psychology 



David R. Stevens 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 






Calvin R. Starnes 

Arts & Sciences 

Film 
Political Science 




Lauren E. Steckler 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Tracey Steffora 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 
Child in Society 




Jennifer L. Stevens 



School of Education 

Human Development 

Communication 



426 Seniors 



Richard L. Stevens 

Arts & Sciences 
Biolosv 



Lisa N. Stewart 

Arts & Sciences 

Communication 

Theatre Arts 



Melinda M. Stewart 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kimberly G. Stimson 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Jonathan G. Stocco 

School of Management 
General Management 





Kristin L. Stoffel 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Christine M. Stokes 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Michael T. Stokes 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Kristin S. Straczynski 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Amy E. Stratton 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Jodi L. Strebel 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Robert N. Streck 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Christopher H. 
Streibig 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology / Mgmt. 



T. Bradley Strickland 

School of Management 
Finance 



Yung-Kang Su 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Catherine M. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Christine C. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



David M. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Ethan A. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Gerald Sullivan 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Class of 1994 427 



Life I love you, 
all is groovy. 

- Simon & Garfunkel 







Class of 1994 429 



Jennifer A. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Jeremiah F. Sullivan 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Kathleen H. Sullivan Margaret M. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences School of Management 

Political Science Accounting 

Information Systems 



Michael A. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Patricia M. Sullivan 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Siobhan E. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Tara Maureen Sullivan 

School of Education 

Human Development 

History 



Timothy P. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



James M. Suppelsa 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 




Monica A. Suson 

School of Management 
Marketing 



David M. Sutherland 

School of Management 
Finance 



Lorraine K. Swanton 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Jennifer M. Swart 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Sarah K. Swedock 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Daniel B. Sweeney 

Aris & Sciences 
llislory 



John P. Sweeney 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Pamela J. Sweeney 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Naomi L. Sweitzer Elizabeth W. Szatmari 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

English English 



430 Seniors 



Grace Taglienti 

Evening College 
English 



Louis C. Talarico 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Mathematics 



Genevieve F. Talbott 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Todd N. Taliano 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Karen R. Tamisiea 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




JL M i 




Taren M. Tavares 

School of Education 

Elementary / Mod. Special 

Needs / Human Dev. 



Caprice J. Taylor 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



James A. Teel 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Jeffrey Teixeira 

School of Management 
Finance 



Christian M. Teja 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Class of 1994 431 




Anthony J. Terraciano Michael R. Terray 



Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Elizabeth A. Terry 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Cynthia C. Testa 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Brett K. Tejpaul 

School of Management 

Finance 

Philosophy 




^*'ll 



Eric P. Tennessen 

School of Management 

Finance 

Operations & Strat. Mgmt. 




Karla M. Tewes 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 




Herman The 

School ni Management 
Finance 

Information Systems 



Nick Theodorou 

School of Management 
Finance 



Megan L. Thomas 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Scott M. Thompsett Donald E. Thompson 



Arts & Sciences 
English 
History 



School of Education 

Secondary Education 

Mathematics 



432 Seniors 





Edward K. Thompson James W. Thompson Ryan E. Thompson 



Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



School of Mangement 
Accounting/ Computer 
Science/ Info. Systems 



School of Management 

General Management 

History 



William J. Thompson 

School of Management 
Finance 



Dennis Thornton 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 




Timothy M. Thurber 

School of Management 

Marketing 
Human Resource M.amt. 



Shannon M. Tichy 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 



Amy L. Tiernan 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Aaron M. Tighe 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 



Eileen C. Tobin 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Shane T. Tobin 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Christine Todino 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Michelle L. Todisco 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Betty S. Tom 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Jason C. Tomasulo 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Stephen J. Tonkovich 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Matt P. Toolin 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Michael Toomey 

School of Management 

Human Resource 

Management 



Joanne S. Toran 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communication 



Kristina L. Torrisi 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Class of 1994 433 



Brendan Toulouse 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Anwar E. Trabulsi 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Heather E. Tracy 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math / Computer Science 



Charles E. Trafton 

School of Management 
Finance 



Annie Tran 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




p i 




Elizabeth T. 
Traphagen 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



John F. Traverse 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Pamela L. Trebby 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Catherine S. Trombly 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Hey you SOM boys! Better get used to those outfits! 
You'll be seeing a lot of them next year! 



Michael A. Troy 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Patrick M. Troy 

School of Management 
Accounting 



434 Seniors 





Vugo W. Tsukikawa 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Chi T. Tu 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Theresa M. Tucci 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

Mathematics 



Lisa M. Tulimieri 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 

Psychology 



Susan D. Turner 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Brian J. Tusa 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Joelle J. Tutela 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 
Histon. 



Christa N. Trbain 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

International Relations 



Xandra Tribe 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Jennifer A. Vaclavik 

Arts & Sciences 

Communication 

English 



Class ofl 994 435 




It is better to 
keep your 
mouth shut and 
appear stupid, 
than to open it 
and remove all 
doubt. 




Class of 1994 437 



Cynthia A. Valentine 

School of Management 
General Management 



Maria De Lourdes 
Valerio 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jill E. Valle 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Edward C. Vamenta 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



James C. Van Tassel 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Daniel Van 
Volkenburgh 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Edward R. Vanacore 

School of Management 
Finance 



Mary K. Vanderslice 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Psychology 



Christian K. 
Van Derslice 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




David B. 
Vanhoornbeek 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Theodore M. Varsamis 

School of Management 
Finance 



Michael J. Vela 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Alejandro E. Velez 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Benjamin D. Velishka 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



April M. Vella 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

Mathematics 




Chad E. Vella 

Ails & Sciences 
I English 



Erin E. Venditti 

Ails & Sciences 
Psychology 



Lorelei V. Ventocilla 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 
Political Science 



Michele C. Verotsky 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Xavier A. Vidal 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



43X Seniors 



Monica L. Vidette 


Jennifer J. Viera 


John E. Villela 


Spring Vincent 


Philip L. Visconti 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Sociology 


Psychology 
Communication 


Mathematics 


Sociology 


Psychology 




Mark S. Viveiros 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Mark W. Voccola 

School of Management 
Finance 



Kristin M. Vrancik 

School of Management 
Information Systems 



Kristine B. Vrtiak 

School of Education 

Elementary / Moderate 

Special Needs / Human Dev. 



Niko Vukelj 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Class of 1994 439 




John L. Waguespack Heather M. Wakefield Douglas K. Walbert 

School of Management Arts & Sciences School of Management 

Marketing Biology Marketing 

International Studies 




Libby J. Wadle 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Kathryn A. Wadlow 

Arts & Sciences 



English 




atricia A. Wall 


Michael C. Wallace 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


English 


Finance 


Philosophy 






Anne Walsh 


Andrew L. Walshak 


Meredith K. Ward 


John W. Warren 


Jennifer Wasik 


School of Nursing 


Ails & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Nursni" 


Biology 


Finance 


Economics 


Mathematics 


440 Seniors 











Greer K. Wasso 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Bradley C. Weaver 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Scott L. Weber 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Regine A. Webster 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Gail Weiderman 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 
Child in Society 




Thomas J. Weihing 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Philosophy 



Karen G. Weinstock 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Nancy C. Weis 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Michael Weiss 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Christopher P. Wells 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Gail A. Wells 


James A. Werme 


Jennifer K. Wesely 


Matthew P. West 


Paul K. Westfall 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Human Resource 


Marketing 


Psychology 


Spanish 


Biology 


Management 


Human Resource Mgmt. 




English 


English 




James W. Whalen 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Christopher M. White 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

English 



Gregory J. White 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Nancy J. White 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Donatina L. Whitford 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 
Child in Society 



Class of 1994 441 



94 



Good friends 

are 

hard to find, 

harder to 

leave, and 

impossible to 

forget 





442 



T 



Seniors 




Class of 1994 443 







Together we've 

climbed hills and 

trees, learned of 

love and ABC's, 

skinned our 

hearts and 

skinned our 

knees. 




Class of 1994 445 



Donald E. Whitmore 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Robin A. Whitney 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Psychology 



Michael D. Wilbur 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Kristen C. Willeumier 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Allison B. Williams 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Dara A. Williams 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kristina L. Williams 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 



Jennifer D. Wilson 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 
Child in Society 



Jennifer S. Wilson 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Scott W. Winchell 

Evening College 
Business Management 




How much more do you think will fit on these walls? 




Christopher Windisch 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 




Christian T. Wise 

Ails & Sciences 
History 



446 Seniors 




Fiesta '93 - BC dresses up for the world! 




Carrie A. Wisowaty 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 




Allison C. Witter 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Matthew J. Wittick 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jayne A. Wolf 

School of Education 
Human Developmnent 



Julie A. Wolf 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Sigrid H. Wolfram 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



So C. Wong 

School of Management 

Marketing 
Human Resource Mgmt. 




Suzanne Wong 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Nicola C. Wood 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Patreka J. Wood 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Erik E. Woodbury 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Paul Woods 

Arts & Sciences 

Chemistry 

Theatre Arts 



Class of 1994 447 




Jay C. Wu 

Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 

Studio Art 



David Wyne 

Evening College 
Communication 



Stacy J. Wyrwa 

Arts & Sciences 
Spanish 



Rozanna S. Yaing 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Robert M. Yap 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Michael J. Yazbek 

Arts & Sciences 

I I Mill, mics 

Psychology 



James A. Yedinak 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Tracey A. Yonadi 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Jane Y. Yoon 

School of Management 

Hconomics 



Anthony J. York 



Arts & Sciences 
Commu nication 



448 Seniors 



Robert F. Young 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Robyn E. Zanin 

School of Nursing 
Nursins 



Tiffany B. Young 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Kerri E. Younker 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 



John B. Zaloom 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Monica Zamora 

School of Management 

Marketing 
International Business 




Melissa M. Zarella 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Nasser E. Zarroug 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Hakam S. Zawaideh 

School of Management 
Finance 



Robert M. Zdunczyk 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Todd H. Zegras 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Tyler D. Zenner 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Hao Zeng 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Mathematics 




Melanie A. 
Zimmerman 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




/ bet you're wondering what we're 
doing in here! 



Class of 1994 449 



Tommy J. Zovich 

Arts & Sciences 

Chemistry 

Mathematics 



Alexis E. Zracket 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Jeffrey J. Zweiback 

School of Education 

Middle School 
Human Development 



Myriam Aime 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Marco Benazzo 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Amy R. Connell 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Kerri Anne Maus 

Evening College 
Business Administration 



Patrick K. Orr 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Patrick Reyes 

School of Management 

Operations & Strat. Mgmt. 

Economics 



Matthew J. Savelloni 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




450 Seniors 




Class of 1994 451 



94 



Take time to 

laugh, it is the 

music of the 

soul 




452 



Seniors 





Class of 1994 453 



ERGLE5 5PHK 

td new HEIGHTS 











Fly like an 

eagle, into the 

future. 





Class of 1994 455 




A lifetime f s not too 

long to live as 

friends. 

- Michael W. Smith 




Class of 1994 457 



94 



Forever friends 

till the days 

end and the 

twilight stars 

fade away. 




458 



Seniors 





Class of 1994 459 



94 





Happiness is 

warm days, best 

friends, warm 

memories, and 

good times. 

- Sean 




Class of 1994 461 



J_L 



Marc Brendan Maffei 

July 21, 1972 - November 13, 1992 










•• 


t*^ 1 






m 






r 


V J 






n 



Friends are forever.. 



As we watched you grow to a man from a boy 

You gave us your love and so much joy 

We'll nevr forget you, you gave us so much 

Your kindness, your caring, your incredible touch 

You spread it to all, no matter what type 

You did it so quietly, with never a hype 

You did the small thoughtful things untold 

That made the person you were unfold 

For birthdays, vacations, phone calls, visits, 

you were never too busy 

To remember us all tho' your schedule was dizzy 

You majored in business; you found your niche 

You did what you loved; you truly were rich 

You matured so quickly before our eyes 

Everything you did, you did with such pride 

You talked about your business with glee 

And how much you loved your school, BC 

That happiness, Marc, we'll always remember 

Amid the sadness of the day in November 

We'll carry you with us wherever we go 

We love you so much, but that you know 

And we miss you soo much it hurts inside 

That's just something we cannot hide 

All your hopes and your dreams 

were dashed that night 

But we can't bring you back, try as we might 

But we can go on living, you would have wanted us to 

So we'll live our lives with good memories of you 

Your spirit is with us; we can feel it here 

You loved you family, you stayed so near 

Our gatherings today just aren't the same 

But your memory is with us as we say your name 

The name of Marc tho' it bring us tears 

We're so glad we had you for 20 years 

Cause the pain we feel is nothing compared 

To the happy memories that all of us share. 

- Auntie Lisa 




"...Now I can fly higher than an eagle... " 



Seniors 



Sean P. Roper 

1972 - 1992 





Lovingly remembered by Mom, Dad, Colleen, 

Mike, and Trish. 



Class of 1994 463 



Look, not mournfully into the Tast. It comes not back again. Wisely improve the ^Present 
It is thine, ^o forth to meet the shadowy future, without fear and with a manly heart. 

- Jienry Wadsworth Longfellow 



I 






pe 



As the summer of 1990 drew to a close, amid the sweltering heat of 
August, cars poured onto both Newton and Upper campuses, ready to unload 
crates, suitcases and the incoming Freshman Class of '94. When we arrived, we 
knew it would be a temporary experience, one lasting only four short years. 
We were filled with anticipation and wonder. The anxiety and the excitement 
we felt, stemmed from the knowledge that our time here would be filled with 
new experiences and ultimately great change. Together, we shared our joys 
and sorrows; we witnessed individual and global changes; we discovered or 
became heroes, and we had "the courage to lose sight of the shore in order to 
discover new oceans/' 

We, the Class of 1994, began; our college experience as a new decad 
folded, ready to become a generation of individuals concerned with notpnly 
our own future, but the future of the world around us. We were born in the 
early 70's, just as Boston College appointed a new president, Father J. Donald 
Monan, S.J., the man who was ultimately responsible for initiating the transfor- 
mation of BC from a predominantly commuter school, to a university with 
worldwide recognition. Twenty-two years later, as we prepare to graduate, 
Boston College bids farewell not only to the Class of '94, but to Father Monan, 
its highly esteemed president. 

Since the onset of our days on the Heights, our campus has rapidly 
changed before our eyes. We have witnessed the remodeling of three academic 
buildings, the addition of two new residence halls, the construction of a park- 
ing garage and the eventual expansion of our football stadium. Academically 
we grew stronger, attracting a larger number of students and requiring the 
growth of living accommodations. Athletically we experienced tremendous 
success on our fields and courts. The expansion of Alumni Stadium symbol- 
izes our increasing athletic prowess. Many of us journeyed to South Bend tw 
years in a row; once as Juniors, to suffer a heart wrenching defeat; and yet 

;ain, the following November, as Seniors, ready to rejoice in the thrill of vie 
tory over the number one ranked, Irish of Notre Dame. The legendary game 
and miraculous field goal will remain etched in our memories for years to 

Wc were exposed to unique ideas, and encouraged by our professors an 
ers to have tlu> courage to make our own discoveries and find useful sol 
3 to difficult problems. Through service programs such as PULSE, and v 



/ 



/ 





wr 



■■ 




Sv* 



unteer projects in Appalachia, Jamaica, and Ecuador, we were able to venture out 
into both the community, and the world in order to help and share what we 
have learned with others. 

Each year we had a diverse set of experiences from which to cull our 
memories. Beginning as naive and nervous Freshmen, we matured into self- 
assured Sophomores, some of us making a switch from the confined spaces of 
traditional dorms, to the more spacious living accommodations of Walsh or 
Edmond's. The following year we ventured off campus, faced with the responsi- 
bility of landlords and commuting struggles. Ultimately, we returned to campus 
ready to celebrate our Senior year living in various locations, including the 
Mods, Hillsides, Voute and 80 Commonwealth Avenue. Walks along the 
dustbowl, lunches at the Eagle's Nest, nightmare bus rides to and from campus, 
and late nights spent at either O'Neill or Bapst, became rituals not soon to be 
forgotten. We formed lasting bonds of friendship, together experiencing the joys 

^of college events such as, Homecoming, spring break, and tailgates. We relished 
the small pleasures of daily life, revelling in much laughter while struggling to 
meet the responsibilities of a successful college career. 

During the time in which we grew as individuals, learning to take advan- 
k tage of our many opportunities, the world around us experienced dramatic 
changes as well. Throughout the four years, the world's borders shifted, disap- 
peared, or were re-drawn among many old and new forming nations. January of 
1991, while we settled into our second semester of freshman year, our 
government launched Desert Storm, an aggressive military attack against 
Sadaam Hussein, Iraq's forceful dictator. Several months later, our most 
threatening adversary, The Soviet Union, underwent a major coup de tat. As 
Juniors we were able to witness a change of political party and a new leader i 
the White House. This year we venture out to face the world, and as we do so, 
we are able to enjoy signs of peace, such as, the handshake between Yitzhak 
Rabin and Yassar Arafat. At the same time, we unfortunately continue to face 
domestic and foreign struggles. We hope for an end to senseless warfare in land 
such as Bosnia, once united and now shattered by civil and ethnic war. 

As our time at Boston College draws to a close, we enjoy the present, and 
remember the beauty of past memories. We prepare to embark on a journey that 
will lead us to new heights, and we look forward to facing the challenges of the 

re, for we will become the leaders of tomorrow, ready, "ever to excel." 












, 




Maria Perunic 
School of Education 
Class of 1994 



Class of 1994 465 







A fabled politico, an AMEX spokesman, a grandfather, and, yes, a 
library-namesake... O'Neill asked if students were using his library. He 
seemed at once both pleased and amused when told that, in fact, many 
students were there during finals. 

"Tell them from me that they should study hard," he said. 

O' Neill exemplified all that was and still can be good about Boston 
College. He was the eternal Irish Bostonian who commuted from his 
working class Cambridge neighborhood to the Heights to be educated in the 
Jesuit tradition... 

Perhaps the best way to say farewell to such a great man is to quote 
O' Neill from his first book, Man of the House, which concluded this way: 

"And while some of the work remains to be done, I must be a lucky 
man, for so much of my dreams has already come true." 

Thanks, Tip, for the inspiration. And the library. 

Michael Hofman 
from The Heights 







1 l . 









' ~< i\" 



i, 



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a 






m 



i**fe?-:^"#' • 



■• : . .':■#.-<; 







Thomas "Tip" O'Neill, Jr. 

December 9, 1912 - January 5, 1994 



467 






1 



Jostens, Inc. 

Would like to congratulate 
Sub Turri f s graduating seniors: 

Kathryn Bishop, Phuong Bui, Christie 
Cerrato, Cormac Cullen, Beth Farrell, 
Ann Fitzgibbon, Paul Hezel,Amie Joyce, 
Maria Karloutsos, Sarah Keating, 
Maribel Laboy, Michele LaMura, 
Christine Leonard, Beth Ann Lojko, Amy 
Lutz, Cheryl Mastrogiovani, Marty 
Nagel, Maura Nicholson, Liz O 'Hearn, 
Maria Perunic, Shirrene Pesez, Kristen 
Pike, Tina Raia, Ronnettee Ramos, Jen- 
nifer Reusse, Karen Scannell, Andrea 
Shaffer, Matthew West 







Congratulations on your achievements 
from all of us at BayBank. 



BayBank 



J 



*\ fr 



Tor Boston, for Boston 

'We sing our proud refrain! 

'Tor Boston, for Boston, 

h Tis wisdom's earthly fane. 

Tor here all are one 

CTnd their hearts are true, 

dnd the towers on the Tieights 

Heach the Jieav'n's own blue. 

Tor Boston, for ^Boston 

'Till the echoes ring again! 

Tor Boston, for Boston, 

'Thy glory is our own! 

'Tor Tjoston, for Boston, 

'Tis here that 'Truth is known. 

CTnd ever with the Hight 

Shall thy heirs be found, 

Till time shall no more 

[And thy work is crown'd 

Tor ^Boston, for Boston 

Tor Thee and Thine alone. 



=\ 




CLEVELAND CIRCLE HARDWARE CO. 
HIGHLAND INDUSTRIAL HARDWARE CO. 



David Miller 



1 920 BEACON ST 

BROO KLINE. MA 02 1 46 

734-6440 



J/ 



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& 



The Publishing Company of An Eagle's View 
of Boston College and.. .Beyond: A Student's 
Guide, wishes the whole graduating class the 
best of luck in their future endeavors. 



J V; 



J 



Advertiser 469 



Congratulations to the class of 

1994 

Wishing a lifetime of health and prosperity 
From your Friends at Cityside at the Circle 




at the Circle 

I960 Beacon Street 
Brookline, MA 02146 

Tel. (617) 566-1002 
FAX (617) 566-4846 



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617-969-3010 



BEST OF LUCK B.C. GRADUATES! 



^ 



8 



AREER 
ENTER 



^OF BOSTON COLLEGE, 



BEST WISHES TO THE CLASS OF 1994 

Career Center services are always 
available to you as alumni. 

•Career Information Network 

•Current Job Listings 

•Career Resource Library 

•Job Search Workshops /Career Programs 

•Individual Appointments 

•Evening Hours on Mondays 
during the academic year 



y v. 






^v 



ON THE FREEDOM TRAIL 

1 1 MARSHALL ST. 

BOSTON, MA 02108 

(617)720-1230 




"Where Lobster is King" 



Congratulations 
and Best Wishes 

to the 
Class of 



. ' 




^\ 




Congratulations Class of 1994! 
from 

The Boston College 
Alumni Association 

Keep us up to date on your address so we can keep you in touch 

with your friends and classmates. 

Call us at (617) 552-4700 or toll-free at (800) 669-8430. 

825 Centre Street • Newton, ma • 02158 



Advertisers 471 



The Office of University Housing thanks and 
congratulates all members of the Resident Staff, 

especially those in the Class of 1994. Your 

service, dedication, and loyalty to Boston College 

set new standards of excellence. 





■ I 






#**<* 


|hfoi*&rift| 


&j,JM 


k.i- -L^iylJ 



Robert O. Jose 

Associate Director 

Residential Life 

Linda J. Riley 

Associate Director 

Operations/ Financial 

Management 

Robert F. Capalbo, Ph.D. 
Director 






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boston college 's on-campus one-stop printshop 



Full In-House Bindery 
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Laminating 
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To the Class of 1994, 
Congratulations ! 



friends T)on't let friends T)rive Ttrunfi. 




Some people 

Come into our lives 

and quietly go. 
Others stay for 

awfiile and leave 

footprints on our hearts, 
and we are never 

the same. 



In memory of Edward C. Farrell, killed by a drunk driver 
November 2,1942- February 7, 1983 



Advertisers 473 



Wrons 



Mr. & Mrs. Jo fin H 3 . {Allen 

James J. &> "Eleanor Cj. CAllt 

"Robert "E. &> Joyce M. {Angelo 

Mr. (S 2 Mrs. "Thomas C. {Angelone 

Marilyn &> Joseph {Antonik 

Teter &> Xaren {Arcuri 

{Angela {Argimon 

Clyde &> {Adele "Baker 

John &> Xathleen "Baled 

"the "Eamily of "Thomas C. "Balsfii 

Mr. 6 s Mrs. "Ernest "T. "Bartoc 

Samuel "Bautista, Jr. "Esq. 

Mr. &> Mrs. Joseph <P. "Beary 

Carol O. "Befirman 

Sara 6* Cjeojf "Bible 

"Erank &> Maggie "Bisceglia 

Mr. (S 2 Mrs. "Daniel James "Black 

Mr. "Robert J. "Blackler 

James {A. "Bodie 

"The "Boron "Eamily 

(Jirard E. "Boudreau 

Mr. (5 s Mrs. Xenneth "Boudreau 

Margaret & "Walter "Brandes 

"Dr. (S 2 Mrs. "Williams L. "Bresonis 

Mr. & Mrs. John "E. "Britt 

Mr. & Mrs. "Robert M. "Brown 

Mr. &> Mrs. {Ham Van "Bui 

Mr. (S 2 Mrs. John "Burns 

Mr. cS 2 Mrs. "Eugene M. "Byrne 

Mr. &> Mrs. CjerardJ Caruso 

Mr. & Mrs. 'Thomas J. Cashman 

"Ronald C. Chimenti 

Mr. &> Mrs. Xent"E. Christison 

"Trancis (S 2 $ail Civille 

-Lee "R. &> Suzanne J. Cole 

Jorge (S 2 "Rila Colon 

Harry & "Ann Council 

•williunrl. Council 

luck &° Eileen Connors 

T.q. Costa 



Mr. (S 2 Mrs. "Edward C. Covahey, Jr. 

Mrs. "Eva Crudo 

Mr. (S 2 Mrs. Jeffrey J. Czar 

"Dr. (S 2 Mrs. James V "D'Mse 

Mrs. A>aul"R. "Dean 

"Dr. & Mrs. "Rene"De r Brabander 

Mr. &> Mrs. "Robert E. "DeJVatale 

^Alba "DeSimone A'h.T)., (S 2 Vittorio "DeSimone 

John (S 2 Marilynn "Dessauer 

Mr. & Mrs. Samuel X."Difeo 

"Dr. & Mrs. {Anthony "Di Taola 

Vincent "Di Tentima 

Mr. &> Mrs. ^jeorgej. "Doehner 

"Ruth & A>aul"Donahue 

Mr. (S 2 Mrs. Edward E. "Donaldson 

Mr. (S 2 Mrs. Teter !A. "Donovan 

"Bill & Mary "Duffy 

Mr. (S 2 Mrs. (jerardj. "Durkin 

"Dr. (S 2 Mrs. Charles "R. "Egoville 

"The Elvin "Eamily 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael C. "Eallon 

Mrs. "Dolores J. "Earrell 

"Eayfield 

Martha "Eisher 

Ms. Margaret "Eitzgibb on 

Mr. cS 2 Mrs. (Jerald S. "Eoley, Jr. 

{Anthony {A. "Franchi 

{Amanda &> Jiarry "Eriedman 

Mr. &> Mrs. "Bruce Gardner 

Mr. (S 2 Mrs. Vincent Q. $ijfuni 

Mr. (S 2 Mrs. "Richard Cjilison 

"Dr. (S 2 Mrs. <Taul$. S ^ 

Mr. &° Mrs. {Anthony J. Cjodino 

Xaye 6 s {Allen $old 

Xevin cS 2 Ellew folding 

Lawrence A. Jordan 

Mr. 6 s Mrs. Michael M. tjottsegen 

'Waller &> Mary ^ race 

1 lim &> t)ail .'Hughes 

Mr. &> Mrs. 'David E. Jturlcv 



474 Gold Patrons 



Mr. &> Mrs. Michael JiurLy 


"Donald &> Jielen Muller '65 


John &> 'Veanna Jiynansky 


Mr. <3* Mrs. JVorman W. 3ig 


Tatricia Ji. lacovetti 


"Dr. & Mrs. John Mziol " 


STrmen &> Shakeh Iskenderian 


Mr. <3= Mrs. Tio L. Orig 


Michael &° 'Reqina Jaye 


Mr. <f> Mrs. Telix Tetrillo 


William &° 'Barbara Jose 


'The J. "Richard Thillippe "Tamily 


Tomohito Xawashima &° Michiko 


Louise &> "Don Tirozzi 


Mr. &> Mrs. John']. Xeatinq 


Mr. & Mrs. John Ji. Tlunkett 


'Dr. &> Mrs. Stanley']. Xeating 


Mr. 6 s Mrs. "Rodolfo "Ramos 


Mr. &> Mrs. 'Richard M. Xelleher 


Mr. (3 s Mrs. Joseph "Resha 


'Edward 6 s Tatricia Xelty 


"Rev. &° Mrs. Lorenzo "Robinson 


Attorney & Mrs. Taul C. Xelly 


Mr. & Mrs. James "E. "Rohr 


James T Xelly 


Janet &> "Ronald "Romanowski 


John 'R. Xersten 


Mr. &> Mrs. John "Rooney 


1)r. &> Mrs. (Jeorge Xubski 


"Donna &> "Trank "Rusho 


Attorney &> Mrs. 'Timothy J. Lane, Jr. 


Charles J. Sadlier 


Marie "Elise Laurent 


William &> Carolyn Schmarge 


John &> Margaret Leahy 


J. Michael Scully, MrD. 


Clngie (3 s Manuel Ledesma 


Mr. (3 s Mrs. Joseph Shea 


Mr. s Mrs. Michael Lembo 


''the Sorokolit Tamily 


Taul (3 s 'Varlene Letersky 


Joseph (3 s Susan Spain 


Mr. &> Mrs. Charles S. Leventis 


"Trank <3» CKminta Spaulding 


Louis &° "Deborah Loban 


Mr. &> Mrs. "Russell SX. Stewart 


William "E. Lobeck, Jr. 


Mr. &° Mrs. Trancis 'T. Sullivan 


Lynn Luberger 


Sullivan's Corner 


Joseph &° Joan Mangan 


Mr. & Mrs. James M. Sullivan, S."R. 


Mr. &> Mrs. Joseph Marchetti 


Cjreg (3 s Tat Sullivan 


T)r. & Mrs. "Raymond $.. Martin 


Mr. 6* Mrs. Thilip Ji. Sullivan 


"Bob 6= Xathleen McTvoy 


Mr. &> Mrs. ^Jary 'Tahlmore 


Mr. (3 s Mrs. 'Thomas T. Mc^uire 


"Dr. &° Mrs. Joseph S. 'Tamburrino 


James, Maureen &> 'Thomas Mc^uire 


Mr. (3 s Mrs. 'Torrence C. Thorn 


Mr. &> Mrs. T)anielJ. McMonagle 


fTdrienne (3 d John Thompson 


''The McJiamara Tamily 


Mr. &> Mrs. "Eugene J. Tonkoiich 


Catherine s Anthony Medaglia 


Mr. &> Mrs. Alfred "E. Torrisi 


T)r. &> Mrs. Jose Medina 


Cjigi (3 s "Ric Trentman 


Sandra &> "Robert Michalik 


Mr. &> Mrs. Carl J. Vella, Jr. 


Mr. &> Mrs. "David Miner 


"Dr. &o Mrs. Michael J. Velsmid 


Mr. £* Mrs. "David T. Mitchell 


Mr. & Mrs. Carlos "Raul Vidal 


STnna (3 s Leif Mollo 


Diarry (3 s CNancy Voccola 


'Ed & Connie Moneypenny 


Mr. &> Mrs. CNeil Weingarten 


Jorge &> "Rosa "Elena Montoya 


Mr. &> Mrs. Tou-Shan Tang 


'Don & Shelley Moorehead 


Joseph Zambuto 


John &> Marie Mullarkey 






Gold Patrons 475 







VER 



'atron* 



Dr. & Mrs. Edgardo P. Amador 

Gloria Argel-Juan 

Mr. & Mrs. Martin S. Bogdanski 

Dr. & Mrs. Malcolm J. Borthwick, Jr. 

Donald & Patricia Brennan 

Jim, Maureen, & Kim Brennan 

Mr. & Mrs. A.S. Bresnahan 

Walter & Anna Marie Bruen 

he Roy & Patricia Bulleri 

Mrs. Edward P. Butler 

Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Capolino 

Toby & Paula Carney 
Dr. & Mrs. Patrick F. Carter 

Mrs. Francis J. Cassidy 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. Celic 

Alfonso Chavez, M.D. 

Mr. & Mrs. John A. Christen III 

Jim & Joanne Coleridge 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank G. Colone 

Charles F. Cook Family 

Mr. & Mrs. Daniel F. Crimmins 

Patricia Cronin 

Patrick & Margo Cunningham 

Downes Family 

Bill & Nancy Eckstein 

Mr. & Mrs. J. Thomas Elliott 

Mr. & Mrs. William Robert Felton, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank J. Gallinelli 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul Gauvin 

Rose Goni 

George & Regina Gorski 

Mr. & Mrs. Walter A. Gradek 

Dr. Paul F. Grmoljez 

Phyllis & Charles Gusman 

Barbara & Charles (A&S '66) Hejfernan 

Jacqueline Tausek Hensley 

Stephen & Linda Hess 

Colin & Robert Ho 

Maria G. Huberdeau 

The Huertas Family 

Mr. & Mrs. James K. Hunt 

Robert & Patricia Hurford 

Jerry & Linde Johnson 

Mr. & Mrs. Ronald C. Jones 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Kintner 

Romayne Kovach 

Chris, Debby, & Brian Kozel 

John & Nancy LaRocca 

Dr. & Mrs. Robert . I. Laudicino 

Mr. A Mrs. Timothy Lavelle 



Dr. & Mrs. Laurance C Lee 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph A. Lentini 

Glynne Lewis 

James & Judith Lucchese 

Donald A. Lupiani, Ph. D 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles P. Luttrell 

Fred & Karen Martin 

Jocelyn & LaRoy Master 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael S. McNeal 

Dr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Morrison 

Douglas & Mary Ann Mowrey 

Mr. & Mrs. David P. Mullen 

Jean & Paul Murray 

John & Karen Nestor 

Maura Nicholson's Family 

Eileen & Frank Paparteys 

Mr. & Mrs. Gene Pelosi 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank N. Peluso 

Sally & Ross Piken 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul Pollicino 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward P. Quinn 

Robert & Kaye Rauscher 

Mr. & Mrs. John S. Renza, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael Renzi 

Dr. & Mrs. Benjamin T. Richards 

The Richter Family 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert E. Roth 

Ilze & bits Rupners 

Greg & Betty Ryberg 

Mr. & Mrs. R. Schade 

Judy & Ned Schepp 

Dr. & Mrs. Werner G. Schroffner 

Mr. & Mrs. A. Michael Sergent 

Drs. Barbara & George Sheer 

Dr. & Mrs. Gerald Sieggreen 

Tom & Grace Stephens 

Jane & Terry Tool 

Lorraine & Frank Trifdetti 

Mr. & Mrs. Theodore Tsukahara, Jr. 

Dennis & Mary Alice Tulimieri 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas R. Vanacore 

Peter & Stella Vassilopoulos 

Carolyn & Ron Vioni 
Mr. & Mrs. James Wagner 

The Walshak Family 

Mr. & Mrs. James M. Weiss 

Penny & Star White 

Peter S. Zegras 

Mr. A Mrs. Frank Zovich 



476 Silver Patrons 



PATRONS 



Mr. & Mrs. Charles S. Abany 

Robert W. & Susan D. Alcock 

Farouk & Giesel Ali 

Dr. & Mrs. Virgilio Alon 

Mr. & Mrs. John J. Amaral, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. J. Amore 

Ray & Peggy Anderson 

Mr. & Mrs. Alexander P. Aranyos 

Mr. & Mrs. F.G. Aruca 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Ascrizzi 

Mr. & Mrs. William D. Auger 

Michael & Kathleen Azzolino 

Kathie Back 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Barbieri 

Paul & Janice Barker 

Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence Barley 

Greg & Donna Barmore 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph A Barrett III 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Barry 

Mr. & Mrs. Brad Baruh 

Mr. & Mrs. Louis J. Basile 



Mr. & Mrs. Jerome C. Buckley, Jr. 

Daniel J. & Anne P. Burns 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard W. Burns 

Mr. & Mrs. Timothy Burtman 

Trini & Art Bustria 

Keith & Mary Lou Butler 

Robert L. Bykowski 

Mr. & Mrs. Anthony C. Caliri 

Richard & Janice Canalori 

Eileen & John Canavan 

Jeremiah & Eileen Cardamone 

Peter & Elaine Carmichael 
Mr. & Mrs. William V. Carney 

Carmine & Judy Carosella 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael F. Carson 

Mr. & Mrs. Matthew Casamassima 

Lee & Tom Cassidy 

Dr. & Mrs. C. C. Caudil 

Joan & Jack Caulway 

Patricia & John Cavanagh 

Anthony R. Cerrato 



Mr. & Mrs. John Daura 

Mr. & Mrs. DeCario 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael J. Del Priore 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Delsignore 

Victor B. & Telly L. DeMesa, M.D. 

Camilla & Tom Dente 

Virgina A. DeRosa 

Dr. Narayan Deshmukh 

Dr. & Mrs. Orlando Di Girolamo 

Mr. & Mrs. Concezio Di Gregorio 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael Dionne 

Pat & Lou Dittami 

Peter & Sandra Di Vincenzo 

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond W. Dobbins 

Dr. & Mrs. James Doheny 

Don & Maria Donahue 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard S. Donley 

Dr. & Mrs. Walter G. Donnelly, Jr. 

Carmen & Chris Donofrio 

Maurice & Maureen Donovan 

Dr. & Mrs. Peter G. Drake 



Mr. & Mrs. Alfred N. Basilicato 


Mr. Sheldon Chertow & Dr. Stephanie A. 


Mr. & Mrs. Charles J. Drane 


Suren M. & Usha Batra 


Gregory 


The Family of Maura M. Duff 


Angie & Judy Battaini 


Mr. & Mrs. Michael Chute 


Mr. & Mrs. Richard Dujardin 


James & Gail Baxter 


Mr. & Mrs. Robert Ciampi 


Mike & Barbara Diver 


Robert & Margaret Beall 


Mr. & Mrs. Thamas J. Cimpko 


Dr. & Mrs. Robert D. Dwyer 


Henry & Agatha Beary 


Joe & Cindy Cinege 


Mr. & Mrs. William E. Ebben 


Dr. & Mrs. Michael L. Beehner 


Mr. & Mrs. Samual J. Civiletto 


Mr. & Mrs. George Eckardt 


Andres C. Benach 


Roberta & Gerard Claps 


Patricia Sheehan Eggmann 


The Benards 


Malcolm & Edith Clark 


Mr. & Mrs. Lee Ehrenzeller 


Mr. & Mrs. Nicholas Bencivengo, Jr. 


Mr. & Mrs. Harry Clune 


Mr. & Mrs. Michael Eiben 


Mr. & Mrs. Robert M. Bender 


T.J. Cody, Jr. 


Dr. L. & Mrs. Elmaleh 


Ginny & Lou Benzak 


Richard & Mary Cole 


Philip & Kathleen Enscoe 


Janice & Ron Berardi 


Claudio & Liliana Colitti 


Mr. & Mrs. Edward J. Esposito 


J.M. Bergmeyer 


The Colleran Family 


Cynthia & Alan Evans 


Mr. & Mrs. Michael J. Berish 


Dorothy & Richard Colt 


Mr. & Mrs. Michael C. Fallon 


Dr. & Mrs. Oscar F. Bernardez 


Frank & Ellen Connell 


Ed & Barbra Falvey 


Lynn Bernstein 


Mr. & Mrs. Jerome P. Connolly 


Mr. & Mrs. Joseph E. Fanelli 


John P. & Margaret Dinneen Berry 


Mr. & Mrs. Stephen J. Conos 


Paul & Joanne Feira 


Jerry & Margaret Berthold 


Mr. & Mrs. Dennis Corrington 


Leonard & Jacqueline Fenelon 


Mr. & Mrs. Davies W. Bisset, Jr. 


Pat & Karen Cosentino II 


Dr. Constantino Fernandez 


James & Mary Blaisdell 


Mary Frances Costantino 


Dr. & Mrs. Edward Feroli 


William & Mary Boehler 


Allan & Susan Cox 


Donald & Mary Ferron 


Mr. & Mrs. Edward J. Bolton 


John & Diana Coyle 


Mr. & Mrs. John J. Ferry 


Alan & Elaine Borsella 


Raymond & Andreina Crimmins 


Theresa & Tom Fiore 


Mr. & Mrs. Arthur L. Bourke 


Mr. & Mrs. Joseph D. Cronin 


Dr. & Mrs. Henry J. Fioritto 


Mr. & Mrs. Ronald Boyajian 


Mr. & Mrs. Brendan Crotty 


Bud & Betty Fish 


Barbara & Gerry Boyle 


Kevin & Theresa Cullen 


Mr. & Mrs. Anthony D. Flecca 


Joan Bradshaw 


Dr. Kevin & Jeanne Cunningham 


Derrick O. Fletcher 


Mr. & Mrs. Richard J. Breen 


Harold S. Curtis Jeanne Curtis 


Robert & Mary Ford 


Judith Broadbent-McGovern 


Mr. & Mrs. William J. D'Agostino 


Mr. & Mrs. Ronald G. Forster 


Richard & Sharon Brooks 


Dr. & Mrs. Vincent D'Amico 


Stephen J. & Denise K. Forte 


Mr. & Mrs. Paul L. Broughton 


Dr. & Mrs. G. DalSanto 


Richard E. Fortin 


Ken & Anne Broussard 


C. Brian Daly & Patrice Daly 


Edward & Kathleen Fracassa 


Martin & Ann Buckley 


Dr. & Mrs. P.K. Das 


Rosemary & David Frauenhofer 

Patrons 477 



Mr. & Mrs. Donald F. Freeman 

John & Mary Freeman 

Julie & Dale Fage 

Eugene & Elizabeth Friedman 

F. Coleman Funk 

Larry & Peg Fusco 

William J. Gaffhey, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Arthur Gagne 

Stephen & Linda Galasso 

Thomas & Carolyn Gallaher 

Mr. & Mrs. John J. Gardner 

Dr. & Mrs. Russell Garofalo 

Diane Gearty 

Dr. & Mrs. Gary Geller 

Carol & Charles T. Genovese 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard J. Gerrior 

Mr. & Mrs. Peter Ghiloni 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael Giambro 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard M. Giannettino 

Carol & Wayne Gibbons 

Mr. & Mrs. Luigi Gioioso 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas D. Godino 

Amparo G. Gonzalez 

Robert A. & Patricia E. Grace 

Dr. & Mrs. Nicholas T. Grace 

Bob & Connie Graham 

Jeffery M. Grande 

Mr. & Mrs. James E. Grant 

Roberto G. Grazzini 
Walt & Rose Gregorwich 

T.C. & Mary Guelcher 

Shyam & Neena Gursahani 

Donald & Marilyn Haggerty 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas M. Hand 

Mr. & Mrs. Daniel S. Hanley 

A. Hannon 

Paul & Eunice Hanson 

Mrs. Patricia Harrington 

Jim & Priscilla Harris 

John & Kathy Harris 

Dr. & Mrs. Herbert Hatem 

Dr. & Mrs. Robert Head 

Mary Lou & Neil Hegarty 

Robert & Maureen Heimann 

Mr. & Mrs. James D. Helin 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. Herbstzuber 

Tom & Bess Hey 

John F. & Pauline B. Hillins 

Inara & George Hirn 
Mr. & Mrs. Earl F. Hockman 
Mr. & Mrs. Frank J. Hol'man 

Celise & John Hubbard 

Mr. & Mrs. John F. Hughes 111 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael Hunter 

Paul & Jeanne I lulchins 

Al & Ann Hylaucl 

Valeric & Joseph Imperato 

David & Susan lofredo 



Mr. & Mrs. Dean Jackson 

Kathleen E. Jamaitis 

Mr. & Mrs. Emerson T. Johns 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Jones 

Sylvia C. Jones & Family 

Mr. & Mrs. Gerald T. Joy 

Dr. Samuel & Merci Juliano 

Peter & Joan Kalac 

Mr. & Mrs. J. Lawrence Kamara 

Mr. & Mrs. Daniel Kane 

Mr. & Mrs. James Karloutsos 

Toshiki Kayama 

Mr. & Mrs. Herbert G. Keene, Jr. 

Robert & Joan Kennedy 

Mr. & Mrs. John B. Kienker 

Elizabeth & Henry King 

Carol & Jack King 

Rosemary & Walter H. Klein 

Mr. & Mrs. James Knott 

Mr. & Mrs. James Kozemchak 

Crystal & Michael Kramer 

Eileen & Andy Krappman 

Mr. & Mrs. Peter Kruft 

Richard & Ann Laferriere 

Louis R. Laggy, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Jerome C. Laguilles 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul P. Lamanna 

Mr. & Mrs. James V. Larkin 

Fred & Aurora Laudati 

Selena & Charles Lein 

Nancy & Tim Leonard 

Mr. & Mrs. Milton Leontiades 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas P. Leyden 

Michael & Angela Liberato 

Maris & Jennifer Lidecis 

Mr. & Mrs. Gregory W. Locraft 

Mr. & Mrs. Kevin T. Loftus 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph P. Logudic 

Stanley & Janice Lojko 

Mr. & Mrs. Eduardo Lopez 

Mr. & Mrs. Manuel Losanda 

Mr. & Mrs. J. Loughman 

Dr. & Mrs. Thomas G. Lutz 

Michael & Ann Lynch 

Mr. & Mrs. David R. MacKay 

Mr. & Mrs. Douglas MacQuarrie 

Gary & Michelle MacRae 

Lou & Cheryl Malauga 

Helen & Michael Mallon 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward F. Malone 

Dr. & Mrs. Robert E. Maloney 

Mr. & Mrs. Carlo Mancinelli 

Tony & Lyn Mangiapane 

Dr. & Mrs. John R. Martin 

Mr. & Mrs. Patrick V. Martin 

Constance Shapleigh Martin 

Aldo & Susan Martinez, Lydis Cordis 

Mr. & Mrs. Albeit Marlone 



Mr. & Mrs. Dewayn C. Marzagalli 

The Mastriani's 

Carmine & Joyce Mastrogiovanni 

Mr. & Mrs. Candido Matos 

Michelle M. Matthews 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas E. Matzinger 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael Mazella, Jr. 

Bill & Maureen McCarron 

Dr. & Mrs. James McCulley 

Mr. & Mrs. James McDonald 

Charlie McEachron 

Mr. & Mrs. R. Charles McFate 

Pual & Ana Lina McGlinchey 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas K. Mclnerney 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard H. McKannay, Jr. 

Jean & Joe McKeigue 

Mr. & Mrs. David R. McKenna 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. McKeon 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert F. McLean 

Paul & Teresa McManus 

Elsa & Dennis McMullen 

Mr. & Mrs. Chris McNamara 

Carol A. McNeilage 

The Meehan Family 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph G. Mendonca 

Dr. & Mrs. M. Menon 

Dr. & Mrs. Paul J. Merges 

Jim & Marie Michalman 

Arthur & Kathleen Mirabile 

Jeffrey & Gayle Moore 

Doug & Candi Moreland 

Richard & Jeane Morello 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert H. Morgan 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. Morse 

Mr. & Mrs. E. James Mulcahy 

Dr. & Mrs. John J. Mulcahy 

Dr. & Mrs. Joseph A. Murphy 

Lloyd & Sandy Myers 

Tony & Jean Navarro 

Mr. & Mrs. John Neiswender 

Mr. & Mrs. Barry W. Nelson 

Bob & Eileen Nichols 

Robert & Kathleen Noel 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert L. Nolan 

Peter & Gail Noon 

David & Joan Olson 

Mr. & Mrs. John O'Regan 

Mr. & Mrs. Herbert A. Orr. Jr. 

The Ouellette Family 

Mr. & Mrs. Mark Overland 

Dr. & Mrs. Richard Pace 
Dr. & Mrs. John W. Paggioli 

Mr. & Mrs. Gordon Palm 
Dr. & Mrs. James Pashayan 

Dr. J. Patel 

Mr. & Mrs. Russell L. Peach 

Michell & Susan Pearlman 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank Pecoraro 



478 Patrons 



LTC (Ret.) & Mrs. Paul A. Pelletier 


Mr. & Mrs. Tarrant L. Sibley 


Paul & Norma Weaver 


Renato J. & Cassandra B. Perfetti 


Mr. & Mrs. John Signorini 


Ron & Theresa Williams 


Mr. & Mrs. Edward Perrotti 


Oscar R. Silva, M.D. 


Dr. & Mrs. Thomas Webster 


Mr. & Mrs. John B. Pettit 


Andre & Veronica Simondietri 


Mrs. John A. Weed 


Mr. & Mrs. Robert L. Phillips 


Mr. & Mrs. John Simone 


Herbert & Jolley Anne Weinstock 


Harvey & Carol Piazza 


Stephen T. Sinatra, M.D. 


Mr. & Mrs. Donald J. Wenger 


Geraldine A. Pierson 


Joseph & Kathy Slubowski 


Jim & Michele Werme 


Charles & Sheila Pike 


mr. & Mrs. Craig B. Smith 


Dr. & Mrs. Marvin L. Wesely 


Michelle M. Plangere 


Mr. & Mrs. Fred J. Sorenson 


Eileen & Peter West 


Barry S. Porter 


Mr. & Mrs. John Soures 


Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence White 


Mr. & Mrs. Robert Powell 


Mary Helen Stallings & Donald Bobrow 


Lynne L. Williams-Powers 


Francis G. Power III 


Mr. & Mrs. C. R. Starnes 


Mr. & Mrs. William A. Wise 


Mr. & Mrs. John L. Powers 


John & Suzanne Steiner 


Mr. & Mrs. James A. Wolf 


Margaret K. Proscea 


Mr. & Mrs. Mark W. Stevens 


Peter & Patricia Wood 


Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Prusinski 


Angela Stewart 


Chuck & Lynn Woodbury 


Frederick & Nancy Pumo 


Joanne & Robert C. Streck 


George & Joan Wright 


Tina T. Raia 


Stephen & Marcia Sullivan 


Mr. & Mrs. James Yazbek 


Dr. & Mrs. Euldgio H. Rectra, Jr. 


Tom & Elaine Sullivan 


Charles & Ida York 


Mr. & Mrs. Wm. I. Reed 


Jeremiah F. Sullivan 


C. Mclver- Young 


Mr. & Mrs. Leo A. Reed 


Mr. & Mrs. Edward R. Sullivan 


George & Lana Yonker 


Joanne & Bill Regli 


John P. Suope & Barbara H. Suope 


Mr. & Mrs. Matthew J. Zientek 


Kathy & Dick Reilly 


Dr. & Mrs. William J. Swart 


Claire Zweiback 


Frank & Gail Reitter 


Mr. & Mrs. Robert D. Swedock 




Mr. & Mrs. John C. Render 


Denis & Patricia Sweeney 




Mr. & Mrs. Charles T. Rennick, Jr. 


Mr. & Mrs. Gerald P. Sweetman 




Mr. & Mrs. Henry A. Riccitelli 


Mr. & Mrs. John Tamanakis 




Mr. & Mrs. Herve Rivard 


Mr. & Mrs. Joseph H. Tegethoff 




Dr. & Mrs. Victor C. Rivera 


Ted & Gerry Teja 




Rodney J. Rivers 


S.K. Tejpaul 




Mr. & Mrs. Thomas F. Rollauer 


Richard & Marie Terray 




Mr. & Mrs. Edward Roman 


Ed & Alberta Testa 




Gary & Rowena Roodman 


Mr. & Mrs. William J. Thompson, Jr. 




George & Barbara Roper 


Don & Paula Thurber 




Linda Ross 


Dr. & Mrs. Anthony M. Tonzola 




Barbara Rowell 


Joanne & Robert Toomey 




Richard & Jo Ann Roy 


The Richard Toran Family 




Mr. & Mrs. James E. Russell 


Mark & Diane Tracy 




Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Ryan, Sr. 


Mr. & Mrs. William C. Traphagen 




James & Marilyn Sachtjen 


Mr. & Mrs. Gabriele J. Troiano 




Mr. & Mrs. Peter T. Salerno 


Mr. & Mrs. Richard L. Trudel 




Rosemarie & Lou Salvatore 


Christopher & Judith Tsou 




Wm R. & Sharon E. Sampson 


Mr. & Mrs. Donald Turcotte 




Mario & Mary Savelloni 


Dr. & Mrs. Rocco R. Tutela 




Mr. & Mrs. John A. Savinelli 


Peter & Gael Ulisse 




Mr. & Mrs. Vincent Savoie 


Dr. & Mrs. Richard Vaclavik 




Mr. & Mrs. Paul J. Saxton 


The Valentines 




Mr. & Mrs. James H. Sbrolla 


Dr. Nelson & Lourdes Valerio 




Dr. & Mrs. Gerard Schilling 


Sam & Suzanne Van Ness 




Jim & Kathy Schlenker 


Linda & John VanDerslice 




Mr. & Mrs. Michael C. Schultz 


Mr. & Mrs. R. Vanvolkenburgh 




Garrett B. Schwartz 


Mr. & Mrs. Rob Ventocilla 




John & Judith Scott 


Mr. & Mrs. Frank Vitolo 




Mr. & Mrs. Rodney Seaforth 


Frank & Carol Volpe 




John & Ustinjya Shahdanian, Diana & Mark 


Parents of Kristine Vrtiak 




David & Katherine Shea 


Mr. & Mrs. Eugene R. Wahl 




Kenneth & Fredye Sherr 


Dick & Nancy Walbert 




Thomas J. Shields 


Mr. & Mrs. J. Jeffrey Walker 




Peter J. Shirk 


Mr. & Mrs. Gerald Ward 


Patrons 479 











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The 1994 Sub Turri Staff would like to thank all those 

who helped make this book possible. 

Special thanks to... 

Arnie Lohman, our wonderful Jostens Representative for his enthusiasm and for 
watching out for us and enabling us to make deadlines "just in time." 

Mr. Ric Brooks, the artist who created our beautiful cover out of a picture and two 
minds filled with indecision. This is definitely the best one yet! 

Father Joseph O'Keefe, our Faculty Advisor, for agreeing to put up with us and letting 
us know we could turn to you for anything. 

Ms. Jacqui Bazin and Ms. Tammy Jurinski, our Jostens Customer Service 
Representatives, for their infinite patience in solving all our problems and answering 
all our questions. Good luck Jacqui ! 

Jostens, Inc. our publishing company for their hard work in literally putting together 
this book. 

Sandy McPherson, the Portrait Photographer for his smile and his pictures. 

Ritz Camera, for every "One Hour Photo" that came through when we needed it. 

The Heights Staff, for all the last minute photos and articles. 

Carol Hughes at ODSD, for answering our questions and supporting us in our 
endeavors. 

Dennis at University Archives and Geoff at Publications for all their help. 

Secretaries everywhere for putting up with our annoying phone calls. 

Parents, Friends, Alumni, Faculty and Staff for all their support. 

Take out drivers everywhere for finding McElroy 103!! 

The Class of 1994 for their faces, their laughter, and a wonderful four years. 

ik You 



Activities 



Thank you to those who helped with the Activities Section. 

Special thanks to... 
Beth Ann Lojko 

and 
Sarah Keating 

Maida Finch 

Lisa Krajcki 

Cheryl Lastomirsky 

Christine Liotta 



Senior Section 

Thank you to those who worked on the Senior Section. 

Special thanks to... 

Maria Karloutsos 
Maribel Laboy 

Tina Raia 

Ronnette Ramos 

Jennifer Reusse 

Brett Sullivan 

and all those who helped with the Senior Candid pages, 



Thank You 483 



i went to the woods because i wished to live deliberately, to front only 
tHe essential facts of life, and see iji could not learn w Hat it Had to teacfi, 
and not, w Hen i came to die, discover tHati Had not lived- Henry david 
tHoreau 



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otography 



photography staff 





above: Christine leonard, 
window snyder, amy lutz, 
becky yang, peter manis, 
matthew west, marty nagel, 
randall tarasuk. far left: 
maura nicholson. left: 
melissa st. hillaire 
not pictured: steve antonik, 
claudette bautista, kathryn 
bishop, christie cerrato 
winnie lee, amy lewis, torn 
rudedgeair 



SpCClcil thctllKS 10 ... all the photographers for all their hard work and dedication; 
beth, phuong, ann, steve, joe and the other editors for putting up with me; amy for doing so much...; 
the heights staff, especially peter manis for his comic relief; daguerre for his help with silver 
processing; george eastman, and anyone else who helped us out with photos in any way. -p.h. 



Photography 485 






Copy Editor 

Maria Perunic 



It ;'■»-— ^- i 



"JpalM 



*- . - 



Thanks to all who 

helped with the 

Perspectives section, 

especially Karen 

Scannell. Your efforts 

are greatly appreciated. 

A very special thanks to 

Beth and Phuong for 

your unrelenting 

patience and time. 



Uime well sp ent 

SJs not lost out still ours 

Jind /nouqn pas/, 

/nese useful nours 

J)u eternity are lent. 

~juan J\,uro 




Copy Staff 

Pictured: Cheryl Mastrogiovani, Maria Perunic, Gloria Backer, Karen 
Scannell, and Renee Riethmiller 

Not pictured: Shireen Pesez, Michele LaMura, Amie Joyce, Cormac Cullen, 
Emi ly Roy, Cathleen Coyle, Johanna Roodenberg, Tisa Dragos, and Christine 
Haney 



4X6 Perspective 



Academics 



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Tar a Bui 

Editor 

This writing business. Pencils and what-not. Overrated, if you ask me. 
Silly Stuff. Nothing in it. - A.A. Milne, Winnie the Pooh • Youth comes 
but once in a lifetime. -Longfellow • The great man is he who does not lose 
his child's heart. -Mencius # Well if there's nothing left to say then why don't 
we all go and play. -Jesus Jones • Room 316, you're the best ! ! • Thanks P.B . 
for all the patience in the world! ! -Tho 



Academics 487 



Student Life 




Joseph B. Plurad 
I Editor \ 

| Student Life Staff: 

Kristen Pike 

SOE '94 

Andrea Shaffer 

A&S '94 

Tracy Hofmann 

A&S '95 

Brandi Stemerman 

A&S '97 



THANKS ! 



• To Kristen, Andrea, Tracy and Brandi, my dedicated, talented, 
and incredibly hard working staff. Without you guys this section 
never would have been done on time (well, sort of on time!), or even 
completed at all. You deserve most of the credit for the success of 
our section. Thanks again for all the help. To Kristen and Andrea: 
Good luck and best wishes. I'm sorry you missed the second group 
photo. To Tracy and Brandi: I hope you guys stick around. ..The 
fun's just begun. 

• To Ann, for dealing with all the stuff I threw your way, and always 
coming back with at least something. 

• To a creative bunch of photographers who went out and took 
more great photos than I could even hope to use. I know at times my 
photo lists were either too vague or too specific that you couldn't 
find the shots, but your talents brought back other pictures which 
embodied exactly what I was looking for. 

• To Amy and Paul: Thanks for going out and taking all the shots 
I needed when we were really close to the deadlines, and I still hadn't 
found what I was looking for. 

• To Pete for taking up whatever slack was left over, and special 
thanks for taking more shots of a subject who can be a real pain 
sometimes (ask anyone in my family or Phuong). 

• To Paul and Matt West: I can't even begin to thank you for the 
"A Day at BC" photo essay idea. Add to that all I owe you for getting 
everybody to go out and shoot BC for me, and coming back with the 
greatest photos yet. 

• To Steve. Yeah, we're done with this one. Just a few more months 
before the mind-boggling oppression begins again. There's still time 
to bail out! 

• To Gautam and Co. for keeping the books balanced so future 
years don't have to worry about security. Who's got the shopping 
list? 

• To Maria and Tara for being around to offer input, advice, ideas, 
and feedback. Your support made days and nights in this dungeon 
called the office easier to bear. 

• To the seniors who donated the candids I used throughout the 
section. Congratulations and good luck to you as well as all the 
members of the Class of 1994. It's been a real privilege getting to 
know a lot of you. 

• To anyone I forgot. It's unintentional, I promise. You know who 
you are and what you did. Thanks a lot. Seriously. 

Finally, thanks to Phuong and Beth, without whom, I wouldn't 
be here. You took a big chance three years ago. I'm just glad you 
had enough trust and faith in my abilities to keep me around for so 
long. You guys are two of the most patient, considerate, and 
understanding people I know, considering what you've been through. 
It's something I'll never forget. To Phuong, sorry about being such 
a bad subject to shoot. To Beth and Brett, a toast. Congratulations 
and all the best. Cheers! 

1 WISH ALL OF YOU all the success and happiness in the world. 
You deserve it. 



■%< 



Men i Life 



SPORTS 

Stephen J. Antonik 



THE PEOPLE WHO GAVE THEIR TIME - 

MARILYN AND JOSEPH ANTONIK ( AND JOLYNN) - THANK YOU FOR YOUR LOVE AND SUPPORT. PHUONG 
and BETH - First of all congratulations on a great book, I don't think anyone will ever know how much time you put into it. 
PHUONG - Thank you for continuing to let me know that you were "NOT WORRIED ABOUT IT, " BECAUSE I PROBABLY 
WAS. BETH - Thank you driving me home when you were just moving your car. I WISH YOU AND BRETT THE BEST FOR- 
EVER! JOE - WHAT ARE WE DOING ON YEARBOOK AND WHY, WE'LL WORRY ABOUT THAT NEXT YEAR. PAUL - 
Photos are what people see first and sports are the hardest to take, your resourcefulness and performance was excellent. AMY - How 
many pages say All Photos by Amy Lut:.? I wish we could have financed Miami. Thank you for working so hard, I know it wasn't 
fun all the time. GAUTAM - NO QUESTIONS ASKED EXPENSE REPORTS COMPLETED THE CHECK IS IN YOUR BOX 
POWER TRIP I'M GOING SHOPPING. PETE - "THIS IS THE THING THOUGH, " We're going to need more cameras for next 
year, probably some photographers too, "THIS IS TRUE. " ANN - Whenever I didn't know where something was, you were there to 
shut me up. MARIA - 1 am looking forward to read the book which you wrote most of. MY ROOMMATES: CHRIS - There is 
nothing wrong with being opinionated in your writing but bias is something else, I'll edit anyway. Tom - Titles are for resumes. If 
you asked me you could have had a higher position than Assistant to the Sports Editor and I want to talk to that photography teacher. 
TIM - We're going to need some words next year and don't worry you can do Seniors too. DOUG, ED & BRAD. THE WRIT- 
ERS: DEB - YOUR ENTHUSIASM WAS INSPIRATIONAL AND AGREEING TO WORK ON THE BOOK NEXT YEAR IS 
AMAZING. ALWAYS A SMILE. STACEY - You got me through the first two deadlines. I appreciate the confidence you had in 
your writing and by the way, where is that basketball story? KATE - Your aggravation with a certain coach did not go unnoticed, 
thank you for continuing to follow through. PAULA - 1 didn't touch the story, you read my mind. MELISSA - All the work you 
did and no photo of you, I'm sorry. ELIZABETH, HOLLY, HERMAN, MARY ANN, KELLIANNE. The helpful people at 
sports information- especially DICK KELLEY - PROVIDING PHOTOS, RESULT PAGES, SCHEDULES, AND ALL OTHER 
KINDS OF OTHER OBSCURE INFORMATION TO SUB TURRI WAS PROBABLY NOT IN YOUR JOB DESCRIPTION, I 
apologize for being annoying. THE PHOTOGRAPHERS: CHRISTINE - Its alright to use a flash in a swimmer's face, don't listen 
to the coach, what's more important? John Denver makes lots of people cry. MAURA - Don't tell me you can't take sports photos 
(women's soccer). ROB, MARTY, CLAUDETTE, COLIN, DAN, & - MATT WEST - You came through for me not only with 
great pictures but you printed them last minute - 1 AM GRATEFUL. DAVE SHAPIRO - The fencing spread is your work, thanks. 
SHANNON DOYLE AND LISA DOTY - You're all over the story and the pictures, thanks for doing the work for me. COACH 
NORMAN REID - Your efficiency made my life easier. ALI MALLOY Thanks for the ID's. ANGELA MACSENTI AND SUE 
CORWIN - Thank you for searching for those softball pictures. JIM CAROLAN - Thanks for letting me tag along to get some 
photos. JON STOCCO - 1 told you anyone can write a yearbook article. MICHAEL SCANLON - Donating photos with no 
intention of purchasing is truly selfless. JOHN HEANUE - "A Moment in History." ALL THE COACHES AND PLAYERS 
WHO WILLINGLYSPOKE TO US, ARNIE LOHMANN & ALL THE PEOPLE WHO PUT THE PAGES TOGETHER, 
FATHER O'KEEFE, CAROLE HUGHES, LEANN, EP LEVINE, & THE F90. To those who fed me PAPA GINO'S, WING 
IT, OAK SQUARE, PIZZERIA UNO, DOMINO'S, PIZZA MAN, PIZZA ETC., & PINO'S. I WOULD LIKE TO ESPE 
CIALLY THANK WCLB, THE BEATLES, RUSH, JCM, BILLY JOEL, GARTH BROOKS, TOMMY, QUADROPHENIA, 
LUDWIG, & THE RADIO STATION AND THE FILM BOARD FOR SOME PLEASANT FRAGRANCES. 

THANK YOU- 



Sports 489 



Business Staff 




Gautam Mishra 

Business Manager 




Thank you Darius, 

Ajay, and Mehul. And 

yes, you too, Joe! All 

your efforts are greatly 

aprreciated. 



Good luck to all the 

Sub Turri 1994 seniors 

in their future 

endeavors. 








• 






AM. 

ft 





"Identification with 

everything that lives is 

impossible without 

self-purification." 

- Mahatma Gandhi 



Mark (Darius) Khorsandi 
Assistant Manager 



Ajay Kuntamukkala 
Sales Manager 



Not Pictured: 
Mehul Gadhavi 



490 Business 



Oh very young.what will you leave us this time, 
You're only dancing on this Earth 

for a short while, 
And though your dreams may toss 

and turn you now, 

They will vanish your way like your 

"mom 's " best jeans, 

Denim Blue, faded up to the sky, 

And though you want them to last forever, 

You know you never will, you know 

you never will, 

And the patches make the goodbye harder still. 

Oh very young, what will you leave us this time, 

There'll never be a better chance to 

change your mind, 

And if you want this world to see better days, 

Will you carry the words of a love with you, 

Will you ride the great white burden together, 

And though you want to last forever, 

You know you never will, you know 

you never will, 

And the goodbye makes the journey harder still. 

- Cat Stevens 




Ann Fitzgibbon 

Managing Editor 



This was my first year as part of the Sub Turri staff, so I'd like to thank those who made life a little easier. 
Special thanks to: all the photographers, especially Amy and Paul, for doing more than their fair share, and 
to Winnie, for her "behind the scenes" work. (And Melanie/Winnie, don't ever try to push me out of a 
picture again!); to Tara and Steve for being so patient while waiting for the infamous slides; to Beth for 
helping me find all those Activities shots; to Joe for showing amazing tolerance and appreciation for my 
last minute photo shoots; and to Phuong, the one who made everything a little better. But then again, she 
got me into this mess. 

I'd also like to mention Nicole,Phuong, and Lisa. You've known me for a long time, and I know we're 
true friends when we can put up with all kinds of moods and still make each other laugh! Phuong, how 
big is that lily? 

And last to Mom and Sean. Thanks for all your support over the last four years. I would never have made 
it if it weren't for your love and confidence. So, what do you do with me now? 



Managing Editor 491 






This is the time to 

remember , 

Cause it will not 

last forever. 

These are the days 

To hold on to, 

Cause we won' t 

Although 

we ' 11 want to . . . 

- Billy Joel 




Elizabeth Farrell 

Co-Editor-in-Chief 



i 



Putting this book together has been one of the most difficult and most rewarding experiences of my life to date, but I didn't do it alone. 
There are always so many to thank, so many to mention. This year is no different. So here goes. 

First and foremost, I'd like to thank Phuong for standing beside me as we put together this book. Did you ever think when we went 
to see Cathy Alecci freshman year that this is where we would wind up? Thanks for your patience with me and for the fun time we have 
had. I'm proud of the work we have done and happy to have done it with you. I wish you good luck in all you do. And next year I'll 
bring you my taxes... Thanks to Joe for always getting in your pages on time and for worrying more than I do. Thanks also for all those 
"last minute" articles that you were able to rattle off for me over the last three years. You were the best discovery that Phuong and I ever 
made. You and Steve will do great next year! Thanks to Steve for doing everything. Between writing copy, doing layouts, taking pictures, 
developing and printing, it is amazing that you are actually willing to come back next year and have another go at it with Joe. It will be 
wonderful I'm sure, with you two at the helm. Thanks to Gautam for making sure there would be enough money for what we needed 
and for conducting a fabulous patron campaign. Thanks to Maria for getting me out of so many writing binds this year and to her and 
her roommates for the fantastic captions that grace our senior section. Thanks to Ann, Paul, Amy and the rest of the Photography Staff 
for always going "above and beyond" to get what we needed for our sections. Your pictures are wonderful and your time has been greatly 
appreciated. Thanks to my family. Mom, Debbie, Tammy and Suzanne for listening to me gripe and for always being there when I needed 
you. And finally, last but certainly not least, thank you Brett. Thanks for all those hours you spent at a school not even your own when 
we needed help. And thank you for always being there for me, in the past, the present and especially the future. We have a date on August 
20, 1994 when I become Mrs. Sullivan. Be there! 

I wish you all as well as the entire Class of 1994 a wonderful future. Though my lime here at Boston College is at an end, I will always 
remember all of you and the wonderful things that have happened to me here on the "Heights." 

CJo in Peace, 



92 





Phuong Bui 

Co-Editor-in-Chief 



Mow I've been happy 

lately, thinking 

about the good things 

to come . And I 

believe it could 

be. . .something 

good has begun . 

- Cat Stevens 



Creating this book was nothing like I ever imagined it would be. I have never experienced anything so stressful and frustrating, yet 
so rewarding. I would do it all again (maybe... probably not), but thank God it's over! I want to thank a great group of people who made 
this year so memorable and this book possible. Thanks to: 

Gautam, for working anything and everything into the budget no questions asked. Paul and Amy, for your incredible patience and 
hard work in putting up with more than your share of headaches. Winnie (a.k.a. "Mel"), for trusting me with your camera (can I have 
it?) and always being there with a smile when I needed you. Pete, first for keeping me entertained, and, along with such people as Matt 
and Tom, for somehow becoming a part of the staff and making a world of difference. Maria, for your wonderful way with words (in 
writing, that is. Can't you talk yet?!). Thanks for never saying "no" to any assignment thrown at you. Tara, you did good, kid, even 
though you had no idea what you were doing. You are the silliest person I've ever known. Thanks for keeping my life interesting. (Tho, 
y'know what?!). Joe, for being the only one on the staff who managed to follow the assigned deadline. Thanks for being so patient and 
calm. It was a relief to see, and an inspiration. Just remember that I also used to be like that before this year, (smile!!) Steve, for making 
deadlines "just in time" and for driving me nuts, and yet somehow I never worried (I left that up to you). I'm sure you were kept quite 
entertained by the never ending crises, and although I had wanted to say that it would be my turn to laugh come next year, I wouldn't wish 
this on anyone, not even you. Good luck, Steve and Joe! ! Why you stuck around all these years and what you're still doing here after 
a year like this. I'll never know, but thank you. Ann, first for agreeing to become a part of this mess, but especially for being a wonderful 
friend and roommate. Thanks for putting up with me these last four years (so what do I do now?). And finally to Beth, lets face it, if you 
want it done right, you gotta do it yourself. Thanks for putting up with me, for the late nights, the talks, the moments of insanity, the rides 
home, and especially for being a friend. We made a great team! Congratulations and best wishes to you and Brett on a wonderful new 
life (what's the date again?). 

That's it for me. Thanks again everyone, 




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Colophon 



The 1994 edition of Sub Turn was printed by Jostens in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. The 82nd 
volume had a press run of 2000 copies. Pages were printed using 100% black ink with pages 17-496 
on dull stock 80 lb. paper, and pages 1-16 on lustro text 100 lb. paper. Opening and Divider pages used 
a Cedar Barkwood halftone screen. Endsheets are Simpson Cottonwood and the Boston College seal 
is a custom embossed dye with the Whispertone process applied. The Cover is Maroon #54 1 on Cordova 
#1 1 74 grain and quarterbound with Forest Green #492 with copper foil. Each cover is rubbed with black 
ink to enhance the detail in the design. The cover and end sheets were designed by Ric Brooks of Jostens, 
State College, Pennsylvania. Mr. Brooks also provided the inspiration for our opening and divider 
pages. The primary type style is 12 pt. Times with Headline styles determined by section editors. All 
spreads were created on Aldus Pagemaker using Yeartech templates and printed on a Macintosh Personal 
LaserWriter. Color photos were made from color transparencies of photographs taken by Sub Turri 
photo staff. Black and white photos were taken, developed, printed and processed by the photo staff as 
well. Senior portraits were taken by Yearbook Associates of Miller's Fall, Massachusetts. 

Colophon 495